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I am considering a used boat that has transom damage.  Anyone have any experience with a transom repair kit?   It has a bout a 3/4" crack down each side of the transom.

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Fiberglass or aluminum? Each side like inside and out or both corners? Either way there is no quick transom fix. To do it right is a major repair. Up to you if the boats worth the work or money

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You're gonna have to put more details in here...size, make, model, style, nothing?

Without knowing that, I'll say no, it's not worth it. 

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No way would I buy that Unless I had more Info including asking price

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I would not buy it.

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I checked out about 8 different used boats before buying new. I was in the market for about a 4k used boat.  Every single one I found had an multi-thousand $ issue. Four had cracked transoms, two had motors that needed to be rebuilt, one had no gel coating left and one had a leak the owner hadn't found yet... Not wanting to buy a money pit that I would be forced to hand off to somebody else, my wife and I finally just decided to just use that 4k as a down payment and financed a new boat with a warranty/extended warranty and Zero worries.  Food for thought.

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Thanks to everyone that replied on the boat with the cracked transom!  When I went back to the site to get more information, it had  already sold.   Could have been my lucky day!

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It was your lucky day...some other guy got stuck with it! The only time I see it being worth it is if everything on the boat (motor, tm, locators, etc etc far out-valued the asking price) That way if repairs are too much it's still worth it to strip it and get my money back. 

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I had a 16' semi-v rowboat with a small 8.8 hp on it, with a cracked (and repaired) transom that worked fine.  If was a something bigger, or fiberglass, I'd stay away.

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When I bought my current boat the guy selling it proudly showed off the brand new, solid oak transom he had installed. My second time out on the boat I hit the throttle suddenly on my 9.9 Yamaha and heard a loud crack.  The transom cracked lengthwise along the grain. 

I came here and asked for advice and the consensus  was to use marine plywood to replace the cracked transom.  Consider that  I have darn near zero woodworking skills, but was I able to effect a good repair. The transom was 1 1/2 inches thick so I  bought a  sheet of 3/4" marine plywood.  I removed the old transom, traced its outline twice on the marine plywood and cut them out with a jigsaw. My cuts weren't perfectly straight (I suck at this stuff) but it didn't really matter.  I glued the two sheets together, clamped them together overnight, painted with a clear sealer and the next day I slipped it in. Perfect fit and it has held up for three years so far.  It  amounted to probably two hours of work combined at a cost of LT $100 ($90 of which was the sheet of plywood). The rest for glue and stainless steel bolts. I already had the sealing varnish.

So don't let transom cracks scare you away.  If I can replace a transom, anybody can.

 

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