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Ever Fish A Lipless Crank Out Deep?

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I'm looking for other ways to fish schooling largemouth and smallmouth out deep... Has anyone ever fished a lipless crank out deep? If so, how did it work? Any tips? Thankyou

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I do quite well in the prespawn yoyoing a cordell spot on deep points. I haven't done it as much this summer but it does work at times.

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I use them in alot in place of deep diving cranks. I'm not an avid deep cranker and can't always tell if I'm in the strike zone but with traps I can count them down and then start my retrieve. I catch a lot more stripes on them than largemouth though but I think that's a location factor more than something to do with the bait

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Yes - The presentation is similar to a blade bait. 

 The Duo Realis G-Fix Vibration Tungsten Lipless & Strike King Red Eye Shad Tungsten 2 Tap, (both in 3/4 oz) work well deep.

And deep is a relative term.  On the waters I'm fishing these - deep is almost always at least 20 feet.

A-Jay

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Yep and just experiment with them.Sometimes after I let it settle , I will reel it in a few feet then let it sink back down  . Other times I hop it . Small heavy spnnerbaits or any sinking bait can be used .

 

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I fish them deep in the same ways Scaleface does.  My user image is of a Red Eye shad that had been choked while hopping it deep.

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Yep - that's the beauty of lipless cranks.  You can fish them at nearly any depth, and by changing weight or presentation, you can keep them in the strike zone a long time.  

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If I catch a couple stroking a jig deep, I'll switch up to either a Diamond Shad (I wish they still produced them) or a Red Eye and work it the same way.  They really suck it in then. Otherwise, it's a spring and fall bait for me.

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You can fish lipless lures the same presentation as structure spoons.

Tom

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NormanKnockOff.jpg

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Up in Canada we fished Rat-l-traps and Cordell spots in 30 and more feet of water.  The bass weren't at the very bottom (somewhere in the middle) so "deep" is, perhaps, a misnomer but yes, I've fished them in water that was deeper.  Did quite well, too.

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Yes, and it works. 

 

However, I prefer silver buddy style blade baits. The Damiki Vault is one of my favorites, along with the Lucky Craft ILV50.

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Yes I fish them out deep both slow rolling and ripping them up and letting them sink. Works great, especially when fish are active. I like the red eye shad, xcaliburs, and aruku shad for deeper stuff in the 3/4 or 1 oz sizes. If I want a slower fall or fish are suspended I use a super spot. I use underpins with fluke trailers, swim baits with jigheads, hair jigs, scroungers, silver buddys, and tailspinners in the same locations and all work depending on mood of the fish. The lipless seem to work best when there's a lot of bait around and fish are active

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yes, and as a side bonus, i've found every brush pile in the lake! 

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Yes, it's another tool in the deep water arsenal. By the time you've ran a crank bait, football jig, magnum worm, flutter spoon, swing jig, shaky head, drop shot, Ned, and lipless through a school you've done about all you can. 

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1 hour ago, Mosster47 said:

Yes, it's another tool in the deep water arsenal. By the time you've ran a crank bait, football jig, magnum worm, flutter spoon, swing jig, shaky head, drop shot, Ned, and lipless through a school you've done about all you can. 

... and then you finally snag into one and it turns out to be a big shad and you wasted  a whole hour in that school . Done that before .

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10 hours ago, Catt said:

NormanKnockOff.jpg

OLD SCHOOL ALERT !

:)

A-Jay

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Yahoo Wing Ding ain't that old!

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1 hour ago, WRB said:

Yahoo Wing Ding ain't that old!

The Rinky Dink is! ;)

The Rinky Dink is a 1 ½" x ¾ oz chunk of solid lead that vaguely resembles a small fish, a small spinner is attached to the tail end. Thrown in is a small treble hook that not even attached to the lure; the line is threaded through a hole in the body and tied directly to a split ring/hook, meaning the weighted body can move up and down on the line.

The lure was developed in the early 1990s by local angler Hugh Rinkle molded off another local bait called a Wing Ding that had been discontinued. Once the bait was put on the market, anglers began learning just how effective it could be but the only problem now with the lure is it's not longer in production. However, there's still an option: the Norman Knock Off; as the name implies, it's a copy of the Rinky Dink.

Rinky Dinks are structure baits fished deep on the main lake or shallow in the creek channels. While many anglers equate cold temperatures with slow moving small lures this can be a big mistake. Rinky Dinks are most productive when casted and fished with a yo-yoing retrieve, the bite all most always comes on the fall and will be extremely subtle. When you feel something that's just not right, set the hook!

To effectively fish the Rinky Dink or Knock Off, I usually use 12# fluorocarbon matched with a medium to medium-light rod; even at ¾ oz the Rinky Dink (5/8 oz Knock Off) is definitely not a power bait. Lighter line makes a difference in the number of bites and the lighter rod will give you a better hook sets without ripping the lure out of the bass's mouth.

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I made a line thru Spin Rite / Little Geoge back in the 70's that has a rear post for a small vinyl skirt that was a killer lure. Still have a few 1/2 & 3/4 oz,  but lost or misplaced the mold.

Tom

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Anybody know who made this lure? It has the action of a lipless crank but sinks like a Little George . I think it might be by Mann's .

 

IMG_5781.jpg

 

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3 hours ago, WRB said:

I made a line thru Spin Rite / Little Geoge back in the 70's that has a rear post for a small vinyl skirt that was a killer lure. Still have a few 1/2 & 3/4 oz,  but lost or misplaced the mold.

Tom

Tailspin lures are highly overlooked & fit the senario perfectly!

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Everytime I truly want to go deep. (Assuming I'm using a hard bait) I reach for a lipless first. I like the rippin' and clackin rap 

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I love the red eye shad in "deep" water. Especially over weeds. Cant go wrong with any technique as long as you get the rattles going! 

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