Jump to content
detroithiker

New guy with a question about rod size in a kayak/canoe.

Recommended Posts

I am still very new to fishing, only my 2nd season, and I want to know if kayak/canoe fishing requires a different rod length do to how low you are in the water?

I have been doing a lot of research and find everyone using long rods but I think that is mostly due to fishing while standing up on a bass boat, so I figure a canoe or kayak changes things a bit, what is your opinion?

 

Edit: I think I should add that my problem is just when the line gets wrapped around the rod tip and my 7' rod is hard to reach setting so low in the kayak with no place to set the but down like you can standing up.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, detroithiker said:

I am still very new to fishing, only my 2nd season, and I want to know if kayak/canoe fishing requires a different rod length do to how low you are in the water?

I have been doing a lot of research and find everyone using long rods but I think that is mostly due to fishing while standing up on a bass boat, so I figure a canoe or kayak changes things a bit, what is your opinion?

I for one use rods no longer than 6'6" because I find
they get in the way when I'm in tight quarters with 
either low-hanging trees, or other structure that can
interfere with casting.

My favorite size is probably in the 6-6'3" range, or
even 5'9". I'm fully aware that the trend is toward
longer rods, but they're just not my cup of tea and 
I don't care what the trend is! :) I fish what makes
my time on the water more enjoyable. I caught my
PB of 7.5# on a 6' casting rod, and I've caught 
numerous bass over 6# on my 5'9" spinning rod.

Just my experience, and I'm sticking to it! :) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the same rods that I use on shore, in a bass boat, or in a kayak.  In fact, I was using a 8' swimbait rod last night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use 7' baitcasting rods for just about every presentation. A rod that is not long enough to "clear the nose of your kayak" can be annoying when a bass inevitably decides he wants to be on the other side of your yak.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The overall size of the rod does not bother me when in my kayak. I do wish the rod handle (from the reel to the butt) was a few inches shorter.

I think there is a rod company that makes a kayak rod where the butt end is adjustable by a couple inches. That looks like a good idea to me but I have not used one.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use 7' rods that I bought while I was strictly a bank angler.  It is sometimes an issue using the longer rods in tight quarters or making what are often short, accurate casts with longer sticks.

However, I think you'd just encounter different issue with shorter rods... Less casting distance if you're anchored and hitting multiple targets, less leverage on the fish, etc etc

If you can borrow a setup of whatever size you're looking at (longer or shorter) from a friend and try it... That's the only way to be sure what will work best for you.  But, I imagine that you can learn to use anything with practice and then that will become your 'preferred' setup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, bholtzinger14 said:

The overall size of the rod does not bother me when in my kayak. I do wish the rod handle (from the reel to the butt) was a few inches shorter.

I think there is a rod company that makes a kayak rod where the butt end is adjustable by a couple inches. That looks like a good idea to me but I have not used one.

 

I actually cut down the butt of one of my Carbonlite 
rods which makes it not hit my vest anymore. Rod
is now 6'3" instead of 6'6".

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like short rods for both bank and yak.  I prefer the 6'-6'6" range, but I do have two casting rods that are 6'9", but I got a great deal on them.  I find that in my yak I often fish close to cover and we have a lot of overhanging trees.  I also prefer to present soft plastics (which is like 70-80% of what I fish) by side arm casting them low to the water, or skipping them if I can.  I find my 6" rod is much easier to do this with then my 6'3" rod.  My main kayak is also only 10' long, so I can get a fish over the bow with even my little 5'6" perch rod.  For bank fishing, I am often fighting undergrowth and tend to bushwhack a lot to find good spots.  

I also agree with Darren about short butts.  My two main spinning rods are customs from SmallieStix out of PA.  The owner's specialty is rods for smallmouth fishing out of kaykas. I have two from him, a 6' ML and a 6'3"M, both with microwave guides (to add back some casting distance) and short butts.  I also have a 7'ML St Croix and it now seems so cumbersome when I switch back to it.  

I recognize that longer rods are far better for a lot of techniques and presentations, but so far I have found the positives of a short rod for bank and yak are still greater than the downsides.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I should add that my problem is just when the line gets wrapped around the rod tip and my 7' rod is hard to reach sitting so low in the kayak with no place to set the but down like you can standing up

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the same rods ranging from 6'6" to 9' for my bank, boat or kayak fishing.  I prefer 6'8" or longer for conventional rods though but it is a preference more than a necessity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't currently use a rod under 7' and I fish out of a kayak with all of them. Now, the issue of reaching the end to untangle is kind of annoying when it happens, but it's not so impossible to deal with that I feel I need to buy new rods. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fish out of a rigged canoe I can stand in.

I use rods from 6'- 7'6". 

If you haven't bought a kayak yet consider a good quality Glass, wide with a V bottom canoe designed for fishing. 

I run a 2hp Yamaha motor and  Minn Kota 55 Enduramax T motor. I can go anywhere I want.. I hunt for big bass in heavy cover a boat would never reach.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kayaks are extremely limited.. Get a fishing canoe and a trailer from Harbor Frieght.

image.jpeg

Edited by WPCfishing
Added picture

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like smaller rods, but will limit casting distance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

6"6'- 7 for me. I have the same problem. It doesn't bother me when I think about being stuck on shore. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/3/2016 at 0:25 AM, WPCfishing said:

I fish out of a rigged canoe I can stand in.

I use rods from 6'- 7'6". 

If you haven't bought a kayak yet consider a good quality Glass, wide with a V bottom canoe designed for fishing. 

I run a 2hp Yamaha motor and  Minn Kota 55 Enduramax T motor. I can go anywhere I want.. I hunt for big bass in heavy cover a boat would never reach.

 

I already own a few kayaks, I was kayaking before fishing so I own a 14' and 12' both sit in, I would love to get a SOT angler but I just don't want so many kayaks in the garage.

I also own a 14' madriver canoe I would love to make outriggers for it and stand up in the boat.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Get a good sit on top! I would recommend to anyone a Jackson kayak. As far as rods go, I have a short 6'6 for stuff and don't like it for kayak fishing, I usually have 4-5 rods and that can limit you, so I like to keep my rods very multi purpose.  A 7' or 7'3 can do more than a 6'. At least for what I mainly do. I think it's most important to get a rod that fits You though, one that fits your situation best! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kayak wise, do not get a sit in: we call them SINKs for a reason: they fill with water and sink. Get a good sit on top, such as the Wilderness Systems Ride, the Jackson Cuda/Coosa, or heck even a Hobie.

Rod wise, I don't like a long rod other than my fly rods. I never go over 7 foot unless its my 9 foot fly rods. The reason is that the longer the rod, the longer a leaver you have to use to get the fish to the side of the boat. Meaning, you have to bend the rod further to get the fish boat side. More bend means more of a chance of breaking a rod. My current favorite rod is the Shimano Sellus 6'8". It is a fantastic rod, and has handled senkos, spinnerbaits, Texas rigs, lipless cranks, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On September 2, 2016 at 10:55 AM, bholtzinger14 said:

The overall size of the rod does not bother me when in my kayak. I do wish the rod handle (from the reel to the butt) was a few inches shorter.

I think there is a rod company that makes a kayak rod where the butt end is adjustable by a couple inches. That looks like a good idea to me but I have not used one.

 

I own a couple Kistler rods that have shorter handles than my other rods. They don't hit my PFD or seat when I'm sitting. 

As far as rod length in my kayak. I own 6'6" - 7'3" and don't have a preferred length. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Dschouest42 said:

Kayak wise, do not get a sit in: we call them SINKs for a reason: they fill with water and sink. Get a good sit on top, such as the Wilderness Systems Ride, the Jackson Cuda/Coosa, or heck even a Hobie.

I don't normally call this stuff out, but I think this is not sound advice.  

The best kayak angler I've fished with fished out of a sit-in kayak.  They're perfectly suitable for fishing, though the form factor does come with its particular strengths and weaknesses. Again, try paddling some other boats that others have and see what you like (and can afford).

If you're fishing in moving water where a self-bailing kayak is important, then fine.  But I have fished all the local, non-white-water here out of both a SINK and SOT.  Sure, I end up with some water at the bottom of the SINK at the end of a day.  But, I end up with a wet bum in my SOT too - whether I have plugs in or not.

There's absolutely no reason to fear having a SINK for a fishing kayak in 90% of angling circumstances.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, HeavyDluxe said:

I don't normally call this stuff out, but I think this is not sound advice.  

The best kayak angler I've fished with fished out of a sit-in kayak.  They're perfectly suitable for fishing, though the form factor does come with its particular strengths and weaknesses. Again, try paddling some other boats that others have and see what you like (and can afford).

If you're fishing in moving water where a self-bailing kayak is important, then fine.  But I have fished all the local, non-white-water here out of both a SINK and SOT.  Sure, I end up with some water at the bottom of the SINK at the end of a day.  But, I end up with a wet bum in my SOT too - whether I have plugs in or not.

There's absolutely no reason to fear having a SINK for a fishing kayak in 90% of angling circumstances.

The reason I deter people from a SINK is two fold:

I fish a lot of busy waters. Lots of boaters who don't know how to slow down, and sometimes in waters that get rough quick with summer storms. The hull design of a SINK I find is prone to flipping. Most SOTs have chines in the hull that can catch easier when the boat begins to tip. And with a closed in hull, it is harder to take in water inside the boat: only pinhole leaks or leaky hatches will cause water to get inside.

The second reason is comfort. I like the options of seats nowadays: specially the high-low designs prevalent on models from Jackson, Wilderness Systems, and Old Town. I also like to stand up and sight fish. I have tried to stand in a SINK already, and I thought I was gonna flip.

I guess my biggest qualm is the ability to fish the style you want: I like to sit high, stand up, and be able to twist and turn to sight cast at redfish or even bass. I cant find a comfortable way to twist and turn in a SINK to make cast, grab equipment, or help a fellow kayaker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I fish out of a Commander 140.  I have NONE of the issues you describe.  The same could be said of the Pungo.  Both good fishing options that are not SOT.  I also own a Coosa.  I'll just say this: it sucks.  Worst boat I've ever owned.  It's only redeeming qualities are that it floats (barely, since the hatches leak so bad it actually accumulates more water than my commander, and the hull design is very wet) and the seat, which is what lulled me into it at first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the exact same rods I use fishing in bass tournaments as a co-angler.  That includes a 7'6" flippin' stick.   Cast angles and presentations will vary obviously but the rods to me are more technique specific.

If there is one thing I prefer in my kayak is a minimum of 7' for my spinning outfits.  Gives me more of an angle when setting the hook with a drop shot or wacky senko.   

As for your comment about managing line tangles at the tip.   With practice you will find something that will work for you to manage this.   Dunked a few setups in the water this way but thankfully they were all recovered quickly.

Tight lines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, J Francho said:

I fish out of a Commander 140.  I have NONE of the issues you describe.  The same could be said of the Pungo.  Both good fishing options that are not SOT.  I also own a Coosa.  I'll just say this: it sucks.  Worst boat I've ever owned.  It's only redeeming qualities are that it floats (barely, since the hatches leak so bad it actually accumulates more water than my commander, and the hull design is very wet) and the seat, which is what lulled me into it at first.

Fair enough. I honestly forgot about the Commander and Pugo. Again, its just preferential. Try before you buy, and find what best fits your style of fishing. For me? SOTs and SUPs fit the bill perfectly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    bass fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing rods

    fishing rods


    fishing rods

    fishing reels
    fishing gear

    Truck Caps

    fishing reels
    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×