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riverbasser

How do you utilize the drop shot?

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I know this is a popular rig and I want to understand how it is used by different people. I understand how to tie it and the tackle but what situations do you throw it. Deep, shallow, cast it out or fish it under boat. Just list any situation that you have success and decide to throw this rig and how you work it back to boat.

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1 minute ago, riverbasser said:

Deep, shallow, cast it out or fish it under boat.

All of the above.

I have had success with the drop shot in all these situations. The length of my trailer depends on where I think the fish are suspended. My bait color is decided by water clarity and natural forage.

 

 

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I'm a shore guy and use a dropshot probably 75% of the time.  You can use it anywhere, all you're doing is imitating a baitfish or other food-looking-creature aimlessly wandering a few inches off the bottom. Depth only matters in that you're casting it at the depth where the fish are at.  For a retrieve I recommend first dropping the plastic in front of you and looking at how the plastic responds to light rod twitches.  You should only need to barely tap the rod to make the bait move (I nose hook really thin baits that also move well with just current).  Sudden or heavy jerks make it look unnatural and I think can spook the fish.  I leave a plastic out after a cast for a good 3-4 minutes, twitching or tapping the rod lightly, then pausing, tap, pause, tap tap, pause, etc. You're going to be doing more holding the rod still in your hand than actual rod movement so I can see how people can't stand it, but it works!

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I fish it shallow, deep, from shore and on a boat. I prefer to be stationary when fishing the drop shot but when on a boat a slow drift can be a killer way to fish it. I keep it simple. I cast it out and let it hit bottom on a slack line. I then take up line until im still slack but one more turn would start moving the bait. I then shake the rod tip real good for a tiny bit, let it stop for a second or 2 or 10 and then slowly drag it and repeat. A lot of fish hit it right after you stop shaking and pause or you feel them on when you go to drag it. Shake the slack, if you feel weight that means you're moving the sinker, sometimes they'll go for it being moved real aggressively(like bed fish) but usually it's a real subtle presentation that gets bit the best for me.

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As somebody who fishes a lot of clear water and has a long-ingrained preference for lighter tackle, drop shotting ought to be right in my wheelhouse.

It's not. I kind of hate it, honestly. I find it awkward, inefficient, ridiculously tangle-prone, and mostly unrewarding compared to most other presentations I could be doing. And I don't believe I've ever caught anything over 11 inches or so with it.  Gimme a worm on a weighted hook of some kind instead (shaky head, slider, jigworm, ned) any day.

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Everything except punching. Like a lot of guys have said on here I used to really dislike the technique. You have to find the equipment, the terminal tackle, the baits, and a fishing technique that makes you feel natural and makes your bait look natural while you are doing it.

Once you get that down its beyond productive. 

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I use it several different ways.  I cast it out and shake and pause it back when fishing it most of the time.  I have used it vertical a few times,  but usually use a jigging spoon if I do that.  

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Shake, wait, reel in a little. Repeat until you get bit. When all else fails, the DS will put fish in the boat. 

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I also like to use it in all the ways you have mentioned. It took me a while to start liking the technique because it's fished so slow. There's no denying that it catches fish; especially when nothing else will. One tip when casting and fishing it horizontally though, is to have the drop (length of line between the hook and sinker) longer than you would if you were fishing it vertically. Doing so keeps the bait up off the bottom better. I usually start with a 24" drop but will shorten or lengthen it depending on what I think will get bit better. 

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I use the drop sot quite a bit actually. From land and also from the Yack.  I vary my drop length anywhere from 12" to 36" depending on the situation. One of my most productive drop shot baits at the moment is the reins bubbling shaker. That thing is deadly. I use a Loomis E6x DSR paired with an abu garcia revo STX. One fun way to get fish in the boat.

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This video is NOT about tying it.  It's about how to use it.

 

 

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The above video is great and so is the one with Mike Iaconelli at the Florida food court. Highly recommend watching.

The drop shot is the definition of finesse fishing. On the lake I fish I will set up my boat to drift past an island and present the bait by casting or right under the boat at times.

I have seen power fishers come in with their crank, swim and spinner baits. They will set up in front or behind me and start casting. Four or Five casts later they speed off to the next spot 90% of the time empty handed. Last week I drifted right past a spot they fished and landed a two and a half pound Smallmouth on my drop shot using a Roboworm. I like the relaxing finesse style but I admit its not for everyone.

As others have said you will catch lots of fish on the drop shot. Lots of shorts with a big one now and then to spice it up.

 

 

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Super versatile rig, but I primarily like to use it in deep, clear water finesse applications.

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It's a versatile rig no doubt. I find it works well in both clear and dirty water even though I usually change baits to something bulkier in dingy water. Personally I cast mine about 95% of the time. I'll use it more often when things are slow and I need to get bit. One thing I do while casting it is concentrate on high probability targets. You'll seldom find me dragging it across a big flat, or out in no mans land. Sure you will catch an occasional fish that way, but personally I find I have better success when I target a specific piece of structure with it. Say a rock pile, a stump or tree, the cinder block anchor of a swim platform, etc. etc. I'm going to get the bait there work it around the cover a bit, and then reel it up. I don't do it fast, but I limit how much time I'm actually working the bait. I will also throw it when there are smallmouth present. A dropshot has put more 4+ lb smallies in the boat for me than any other technique. 

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On 9/7/2016 at 8:15 PM, Ktho said:

I fish it shallow, deep, from shore and on a boat. I prefer to be stationary when fishing the drop shot but when on a boat a slow drift can be a killer way to fish it. I keep it simple. I cast it out and let it hit bottom on a slack line. I then take up line until im still slack but one more turn would start moving the bait. I then shake the rod tip real good for a tiny bit, let it stop for a second or 2 or 10 and then slowly drag it and repeat. A lot of fish hit it right after you stop shaking and pause or you feel them on when you go to drag it. Shake the slack, if you feel weight that means you're moving the sinker, sometimes they'll go for it being moved real aggressively(like bed fish) but usually it's a real subtle presentation that gets bit the best for me.

this is the technique i use:  shake the slack not the worm. the bites usually come on the pause after the shake.   if i'm not getting bit i will add some violent shakes in which occasionally works.  it's important to dead stick the rig on the initial fall.  just gently reeling up the slack after a 20-30 second deadstick will get you lots of bites.  an initial fall deadstick followed by a twitch is my bread and butter (just like initial frog splash down with long deadstick/light twitch is deadly on big girls).

On 9/8/2016 at 2:48 PM, WIGuide said:

It's a versatile rig no doubt. I find it works well in both clear and dirty water even though I usually change baits to something bulkier in dingy water. Personally I cast mine about 95% of the time. I'll use it more often when things are slow and I need to get bit. One thing I do while casting it is concentrate on high probability targets. You'll seldom find me dragging it across a big flat, or out in no mans land. Sure you will catch an occasional fish that way, but personally I find I have better success when I target a specific piece of structure with it. Say a rock pile, a stump or tree, the cinder block anchor of a swim platform, etc. etc. I'm going to get the bait there work it around the cover a bit, and then reel it up. I don't do it fast, but I limit how much time I'm actually working the bait. I will also throw it when there are smallmouth present. A dropshot has put more 4+ lb smallies in the boat for me than any other technique. 

i like targets too but if there aren't any to be had i focus on 3-4 'zones'.  the initial deadstick is my main focus, even if it's in wide open water.   then i'll either stroke or power swim 20-25ft to zone 2.  i'm feeling for rock/timber along the way and if i find any i'll soak it there.  zone 2 gets another deadstick/slack shake b/c i've likely caught the attention of fish in a new area.  repeat to zone 3.  i've found this method extremely effective yet not near as painful as slow dragging it 75ft, which is how a lot of guys view the rig.

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I don't like to fish blind with a drop shot so if I don't meter bait or bass it stays on the deck.

I prefer fishing a drop shot vertically and rarely cast it 10 yards away from my boat position. If casting a further distance finesse fishing I use the slip shot rig.

Tom

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I prefer to put the hook on the keeper and wrap the sinker around the rod, lay the combo down and pick up something else.

It's a target bait for me, especially vertical cover or deep structure. 

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There are basically two situations when I reach for a drop shot.  The first is similar to what WRB mentioned, once I've found fish. In my case, that means I've caught one and am confident the spot holds more.  A follow up presentation for lack of a better explanation.  The other is under cold front conditions on a piece of structure that has good potential, or that has produced regularly.  As I fish shallower bodies of water that are very clear, I'm casting with a long leader on a long rod to keep the bait up off the bottom. 

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