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waldo567

Beginner fishing techniques

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I know there are a lot of different fishing techniques, rigs, baits, ect and all suit different conditions however, as a beginner fisherman is best to focus on just a couple techniques or rigs and get really comfortable fishing those as opposed trying your hand at a bunch of different ones even if you are trying to match the conditions? It can be very confusing, not to mention expensive for a new fisherman.

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I am a relatively new bass fisherman and I understand what you mean. Every time you watch a video the fisherman states that this lure or that lure will absolutely slay the bass so it is confusing. Personally, I use an unweighted senko worm in green pumpkin color. That has been my go to lure and I have caught some nice fish with it. I also have used a small rubber crawdad with a lot of success. Talk to people that you see on the rivers or lakes and see if they can recommend something. Start small and see what works. I like the rubber stuff. Maybe because I used to fly fish a lot but a lot of lures really do work.

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If you like chucking and winding, a spinner bait would be good. Fairly weedless and you can cover the entire water column. If slow fishing is your thing, a weedless Carolina rig would be a good choice. JMO of course.

There's also top water to consider.

 

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It can be very confusing when your walking down the isle of your favorite bait shop, I agree, limit the amount of things you need to just a few is a great idea when your first starting out, the T-Rig ( Texas Rig ) is basically our SUV, the go anywhere do almost anything kind of rig you want, you can finesse that set up by removing the weight and using a split shot for those really finicky days.

Start there, you really can't go wrong with that, as you are starting out, try making your bait enter the water as quietly as possible, work on technique and presentation while your getting the feel for what's on the bottom vs. what is a bite, start by working your way around cover from the outside and work your way in if you are able to do so, focus on points if at all possible or bridge pilings, easy targets that hold fish, don't get discouraged, your going to get hung up, your going to lose some tackle, if you get hung up try not to make to much of a ruckus trying to free the bait, a lot of times a bass may be eying the bait, try giggling the line first and see if you can illicit a strike, most of all, enjoy your time on the water.

Good luck and be safe !!!

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I have been doing a lot of Texas Rigging and think I will stick with that for the most part. I have other lures I've used but have been enjoying soft plastics the most. Plan on checking out the Ned rig too

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As someone who recently took up fishing again after about 20 years (what was I thinking during that time?) and now have sensory overload with all the different types of lures and rigs I can relate.  

After almost buying just about every type of lure there is I decided to go back to basics by fishing top water baits, spinnerbaits, and Senkos for the remainder of the year.  Definitely talk to people who fish around you.

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Like others have said, talk to others to see what works in your area, baitshops are usually a good place to start, I would probably start with a spinnerbait or buzzbait to locate the fish and to cover alot of area quickly, shallow crankbaits also, then maybe slow down and go with the plastics, I'm gonna be trying out tubes shortly, cause alot of guys here on the forums seem to really like them and I've never tried them,,,, hopefully the fishing God's will be with me,,,, 

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Texas Rig weighted or unweighed

Can be fished year round, in any water condition, in any type cover, & at any depth.

After that roll the dice ;)

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Welcome to the forum!  T-rigs are your best starting point, not only because they're versatile and catch fish, but also because they'll teach you how to feel the bottom.  Learning to fish a T-rig or light Carolina rig will help you actually develop a lot of techniques that will come in handy later.

For less than $100, you can get set up well with what you'd need for most conditions.   7" curl and straight tail worms, and a few packs of Rage or Speed craws will go far.  Pick up colors like green pumpkin, pumpkin red fleck, watermelon, junebug, and black.  A jar of JJ's Magic or Dip'n'Dye in chartreuse to add SMALL chartreuse accents to claws and tails will be cheaper than buying extra packs of all of the above with chartreuse accents already on them.  Those colors and baits will cover most conditions on most bodies of water and won't break the bank.   As for weights, a general rule (worry about when to break it later) is to keep them just heavy enough for good bottom contact.  For this, 1/8-3/4 oz is common, with deeper water or thicker cover typically requiring more weight.  As a beginner, just use lead and don't drop the extra money for tungsten.  Do, however, spend the money on good hooks.  Gamakatsu, Owner, Mustad, VMC, all make solid 2/0 to 4/0 wide gap worm hooks made for T-rigging that are affordable.  

Good luck!

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Learn to fish the Texas rigged plastic worm . Concentrate on detecting strikes and learn how to set the hook . Dont get discouraged . Its the best fish catcher of all time , can be fished anywhere  and after  learning it all other techniques are easy .

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All great advice. I am going to stick with Texas Rigged senkos and other worms.  Going to throw some flukes too.  I had some success with those. The lures will stay in the tackle bag for now. 

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i'd stick to the basics when starting out and keep it simple with color.

white spinnerbait

chrome lipless crank (ratltrap)

small crankbait

t-rig plastic weighted and weightless (grn pumpkin or black/blue)

jig w/ plastic craw trailer (grn pumpkin or black/blue)

 

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I usually throw a variety of different baits and colors till the fish say bingo.

Topwater popper

Shallow crankbaits

Spinnerbaits

Inline spinners

Minnowbaits (hard body)

Carolina rig (senko / brushogs)

Something will get action. Vary your presentations. Read and watch every video and article here, they go out and try it. Read everything over and over all winter. Nothing beats time spent on the water.

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I got into bass fishing (as an adult) just a few years ago... So take this with an appropriately sized grain of salt.

I'd start with soft-plastic-based, finesse-able presentations first.  In my experience, if fish are chasing cranks or spinners, they'll also bite soft plastics thrown in front of them.  And, when they're not chasing/active, the slower presentation of most soft plastic techniques seems to be better suited to enticing a strike.  

I got my start with @roadwarrior's "Guaranteed to catch bass" thread (linked in his post above)... and, dead-sticking soft plastics like that teaches patience (that will benefit you all kinds of ways later), helps you feel/sense the bottom, and always seems to product fish.  

When you add shakey-head or drop-shotting presentations as variations on that theme, you've got some very effective tools to catch fish.

 

Now, having said that:  If you really find something INTERESTING or EXCITING, start with that... If you think spinnerbaits seem fun, do that first.  Or frogging, or whatever.  In the end, nothing is going to help you grow as an angler more than time on the water.  And this is supposed to be fun, after all.

 

EDIT:  I should hasten to add that you should feel free to post when you have questions/issues... I don't think I've found a more supportive and helpful community online.  Just try to search the site before you post a new thread... But, if no answer turns up in a search, fire off a post and let's all learn together.

 

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Welcome

Yes, it is better to get comfortable with one or two techniques. Some good suggestions as to what to start with, but I'll add this; Reaction, fast moving baits, appeal to the aggressive nature of bass. That's one reason bass fishing is so popular.  The downside to starting out with them is the bass aren't always cooperative. Starting with a presentation that will appeal to them no matter what mood they're in has a higher percentage of success. Soft plastics rigged weedless or T-rigged fit that bill perfectly.  Gain confidence in that type of presentation and then add one that appeals to active fish and you'll have the basics down pat.

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When I started getting really into bassin' this year, I focused on the Texas Rig, specifically things like Brush Hogs, Z Hogs, and soon curly tailed worms. I soon learned to read the water, the conditions, etc. I still always go to the Texas Rig when it comes to fishing around grass and hangs.

Soon, I started using spinnerbaits (one color combo: white and charteuse), lipless cranks, and now I am working on drop shotting. The main thing is to learn what the bass in your area want. Take the time to talk to other anglers, research, and most important in my book, keep a fishing log. Log the water conditions, wind, temp, what baits worked, what ones didn't cover, retrieve style, etc. Then use this information to help you pattern fish.

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On 9/24/2016 at 9:35 AM, roadwarrior said:

I followed the advice on guaranteed to catch bass and caught 3 bass in about an hour and a half. The day was cloudy and a little rainy and the pond was pretty muddy so I didn't think I would catch anything. Used a black and blue flake senko instead of the color recommended. The key is to fish slow and have patience. 

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I take quite a few begginers fishing with me. One bait that almost always produces is a curly tailed grub on a lead head jig. My son regularly wears me out with a white grub. just throw it out and slowly reel it back. You can also put a worm on it and drag it along weed edges. they're cheap so if you get hung in the trees just break it off and tie on another. Plus you can down size and catch any thing that swims. thats were i always start if a new fisherman or kid is in the boat with me. anytime of year.

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I would recommend sticking to a couple different baits, and once you get a firm comfort level with those, then try some new techniques. Here's what I would recommend:

1. Spinnerbaits (including inline spinners): Cant get much simpler than this. Cast them out and reel them in. Try a fast retrieve, or slow roll it just fast enough to keep the blades turning. 

2. Crankbaits: Again, just cast and retrieve. Areas with stumps and rocks try a squarebill, for open or grassy areas use a lipless. 

3. Texas-rigged Senko: Develop your patience with this fish catcher!

 

You will catch plenty of fish on these techniques and they are all very simple to learn. Watch a few videos if you aren't sure how to fish them - plenty of good videos here and on YT. 

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You've got lots of great answers, so I'll just say
welcome aboard!

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I'd get a few baits in each category that cover the entire water column (from top to bottom) so you can adapt to where the fish are:

Top water: One minnow bait (such as a floating Rapala), one prop bait (such as a baby torpedo) and a popper or a walk-the-dog bait.

"Middle" water column:  at least one 1/2 oz white spinnerbait and/or inline spinner (such as a Panther Martin).  At least one medium diving (4-7 foot) crankbait. and a lipless crankbait such as a Rat-l-trap or red eye shad (for the budget conscious, you can't beat a Cordel Spot) 

Bottom:  Texas rigged worm such as a 7 inch Berkley Powerbait worm, stick bait (such as a Senko or Yum Dinger), one jig (I prefer a texas-rigged weedless crawdad), a deep diving crankbait

We (including the bait monkey) all know you will get more but in my opinion this is a good starter kit

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