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Takemeoutside

Just starting out

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Hey yall!

I recently just got into fishing. I purchased myself a medium action spinning rod. Only problem is I have no idea what im doing. I havent been able to find any helpful tutorials or anything that really explain to me what I should be doing just starting out. I tried youtube but Im easily confused when they starting spitting out terms and using lures/things that I have no idea how I should be using or what they are. So...Now that I got this rod. What type of lures/baits should i get? I dont have anyone to help me. Whats the easiest and most basic way to start out fishing? Haha anyone got any advice for me??

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for lures start simple and easy

get a pack of these in black/blue and some in watermelon redflake (use black/blue in murky water anything with somewhat decent visibility use watermelon redflake) http://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/yum-5-dinger-soft-baits-8-pack#repChildCatid=1233249

a pack of these in 4/0

http://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/h2o-xpress-super-lock-single-worm-hooks-25-pack#repChildCatid=412254

and a pack of these for fishing deeper water (i reccomend 1/8 oz to start).

http://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/water-gremlin-low-profile-slip-sinkers#repChildCatid=20891

two good ways to start is texas rig either use the weight and drag/hop it along the bottom, or to twitch it weightless.

 

learn that first then try something else.

 

good luck

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Thanks so much! I appreciate you taking your time to help a lot. I do have some questions though if you dont mind.

What does the 4/0 mean? And why would I being a 4/0 compared to the 3/0? Whats the difference? And for what purpose?

Also why the 1/8 oz? How do i know what weight size to use when and where? 

Im sorry I may seem a little stupid. Quick background info on me, I played video games all my life and now I realized i wasted a lot. I sold all them and thought I'd pickup fishing. Im completely clueless as to everything, so i apologize. I really appreciate the help!

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       4/0 and 3/0 are just different hook sizes. Refer to the image attached here. Hooks range from size 7 to 7/0. The single digit numbers, 7-1 are referred to as size X, such as size 7. The numbers with a / are referred to as X aught, such as 7 aught for 7/0. It can be confusing at first but stick to 3/0 and 4/0 at first and you'll quickly figure it out. The 4/0 is simply bigger than the 3/0 and better suited for the style of worm the poster linked above. You want to match hook size to bait size, so there is enough gap in the hook for the bait to slide and to be able to hook the bass.

       As for the weight sizes, that gets tricky too, but 1/8 oz is a very good size to start with. The purpose of the weight is to get the lure to the bottom, or wherever it is you are fishing, faster. Ideally, you want a slow fall so you go fairly light. 1/8 oz is a very good middle ground and a good place to start. As a beginner, I recommend fishing a worm WITH a weight as opposed to without a weight, it can be tricky detecting bites without a weight at first. 

       I would google "texas rig" and learn all about it. This is the way you will fish your worm, and just about every other "soft plastic" lure you will fish with after. It's a solid technique that just about every fisherman starts with. Once you learn that, you can branch out. Find articles, videos, etc. 

Screen Shot 2016-10-17 at 1.32.53 AM.png

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       I found two videos going over the texas rig for you. Ignore their comments at the beginning of when they throw it, if you're just starting out, I'm assuming you're fishing ponds. There will be fish in there, it's just a matter of getting the bait out there and figuring out how to work it. It's a simple rig but like anything else requires practice. 

http://www.bassresource.com/bass-fishing-videos/texas-rig-how-tips.html

       Also, you NEED to learn some knots and get good at them. Google the improved clinch knot or the palomar knot. That will be a huge help. View the green horizontal bar on this website, on there it says 'fishing articles' and ' videos'. There are hundreds of pieces that can help you on this site, just research for 30 minutes, then get out and practice. You'll get the hang of it quickly.

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I sent you a PM with some info...there is a bunch of how to videos on youtube and many threads on here. You can use the search bar...may answer or find answers to some of you questions.

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6 hours ago, Takemeoutside said:

Thanks so much! I appreciate you taking your time to help a lot.  

Im sorry I may seem a little stupid. Quick background info on me, I played video games all my life and now I realized i wasted a lot. I sold all them and thought I'd pickup fishing. Im completely clueless as to everything, so i apologize. I really appreciate the help!

Congrats, man! Whatever you do, DON'T get discouraged when you're not catching fish! Learn something every time you're on the water...what worked, what didn't, what your lures do in the water, temperatures, etc. Most of all, have fun and enjoy being outdoors!

I just started bass fishing this year. I did very well with Yamamoto Senkos (or any other brand stick bait) wacky rigged, which is extremely simple. I use a Gamakatsu wicked wacky hook size 2/0-3/0. 

I also did well with texas rigged soft plastics, especially Strike King Rage Bug in black, green pumpkin, and peanutbutter and jelly. I rigged them on a Gamakatsu EWG 4/0 hook. 

Have fun! Good luck, and keep returning here for information and advice! These guys are extremely helpful!

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Its very easy to get overwhelmed with all of the information you may incounter, dont allow it to confuse you.  Best way to learn, is to take it one lure at a time.

 There are however, a few "basics" you will need to consider before leaving home for your first fishing trip.

 Learn one good knot, and when you are about to cinch it down, if using mono line be sure to wet the knot before cinching it, I wet it with spit by licking it. If you dont wet it, it will generate heat, therefore, weakening the knot, and it will fail.

 Take one lure of choice, a pair of pliers, and fingernail clippers.,... The pliers are to aid in removing the hook from a bass's boney mouth, when need be, and the clippers are for snipping the "tag" end of line when tying knots.  

A hat and sunglasses that are polorized  will also be necessary, both serve two purposes, the hat will help protect your head from a possible errent cast, and help shield your eyes from the sun. And sunglasses protect your eyes not only from the suns rays, but if you get your lure hung up and pull hard, if and when, it comes free it may shoot straight back at your face,,..in which case.DUCK, lol.. and the "polorized" part is to aid with seeing under the waters surface.

 your ready to fish ,...have fun, and I hope you hook into a big one

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Welcome aboard!

Just starting out? Live bait will certainly help you
get bit :) Live night crawlers on a hook under a 
float (bobber) is a classic starter method. Often 
see a variety of fish hitting the bait - like bluegill,
crappie, perch, in addition to bass.

I would definitely start out simply.

Next I'd suggest what's called a wacky rig because
it is another proven catcher of bass. Simply, it is a 
relatively small hook (a size 1 to 1/0) at the end of 
your line (use a simple palomar knot to tie the hook),
and you rig a 4 or 5 inch Senko (soft stick bait) on a
perpendicular angle to the hook - right through the
middle. Cast it near docks, fallen trees, etc. Be
patient, let it fall. No bite, lift and shake gently, then
reel back a short bit. Rinse and repeat back to you.

Following that I like the drop shot rig. To keep this
simple, I'll link to the articles on it.

Good luck!

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Wow you all have been more than helpful. Thank you so much. I ordered some of the stuff you all said to get to just start out. Currently practicing the knots on some spare rope haha. I wrote down everything you all told me in a notebook i'll use as a fishing journal.

Not to be annoying but I do have one more question, What kind of line should i be using? I've been reading and i realize there are a few different types each with some sort of weight assigned to them. im assuming this deals with the size of the fish pulling on the line, right? What would be a good type of line for just all around fishing?

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Where are you fishing and what fish are available ?  There may be other fish  more cooperating than bass  . I started out fishing for bullheads and bluegills . They were plentiful and got me hooked om fishing . 

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haha I honestly couldnt tell you what fish are available. I'm not too sure. Im in Cleveland Ohio. Basically I could fish the neighborhood pond, Lake Erie or the Cuyahoga river. 

 

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The Texas rig with or without weight. I can take a spinning rod with just one 3/0 offset hook and fish so many soft plastics off that one set up. 

I don't know where you fish in Cleveland . But I suggest you try senkos, and a grub on a jighead. 

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Not sure about weather patterns/fishing out in Cleveland but with colder months approaching you might have some frustrating outings if targeting largemouth (I don't have any smallmouth where I'm at so don't know their winter habits).  If you're just starting out I'd go with either a wacky senko or a dropshot.  Wacky senko would be for it's pure simplicity, you just tie on a hook with a palomar knot, hook your senko in the middle, and let it fall.  Dropshotting will require an extra knot and weights, but well worth learning to rig.

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For line - I would suggest getting an 8 or 10lb test (meaning it will fail with approximately 10 pounds of force) monofilament.   Don't get the cheapest you can find.  Spending a little on line will go a long ways.  But, you don't need the best there is.  Don't get too caught up in the brand right now, but stick to something like Stren, Spiderwire, Berkley etc.  Good line, but not the "best" in the business.  (Asking which is the best here would probably cause a war, lol)

With line, *generally heavier line will be thicker and more forgiving... lighter line will be more subtle, and you can feel more (usually) but much less forgiving. 8 or 10 pound line will let you throw a variety of weights and still have some safety in the strength.  I also highly agree with Yeajray231 on adding grubs to your arsenal.   And here is a simple fix, wal-mart usually sells a cheap grub kit.  Lots of colors and sizes and a mix of jig heads.  Perfect for just getting started.  And they are dead simple to use, work everywhere on multiple species, year round.  Just cast them out, and reel em in basically.  :-)

Welcome to the addiction, and rest assured - the only limit to the information you can get here is the amount of time you put in researching.  But, and I cannot stress this enough... K.I.S.S.  (Keep it Simple Sam)  Don't fret over learning umpteen different styles, fall victim to the color debate, or believe that this lure, or that rod will make the difference.  Take your time and get confident with just a few presentations.  Then slowly add to that repertoire.  The good, and bad thing for you is that you are starting in the fall.  Bites could be good now, but will be slowing over the winter --- which means you can get your feet wet, so to speak, immediately --- then over winter you can take your time and read and learn tons.  Next spring, you can apply that new knowledge with your experience from this fall and make great strides over the next year!

Oh, one thing to keep in mind.  Lure companies are trying to sell humans lures.  Fish don't care who makes it... and honestly rarely care about the 50 different shades of color available.  It's easy to get caught up in hype, and hyperbole over the next great lure.  Start with the basics and you will do fine.

Here is one tip that seems simple, but really makes a big difference when you are fishing.  Generally ---- Smaller lures will entice more fish, but usually they will be smaller.  Larger lures will often entice larger fish, but much fewer bites.  So if you are having trouble getting bit, sometimes you can just  go smaller and start getting fish.  

 

 

 

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One thing you should strongly consider is spooling your spinning outfit with 15 pound braid, and then tying on a fluorocarbon leader as needed.  Pretty much everything can be fished on either straight braid or a braid/leader combo, and the braid will last for years.

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For your first setup, just go with monofilament. Berkley Trilene XL Smooth Casting is a fantastic mono and it is only $8 for a 300 yard spool. Anywhere from 8-12 is a good start, but I'd stay closer to 12 since you are new. Lighter you go, the harder it is to tie better knots and easier to snap the line - once you get more experienced you can go down in size. 

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Id say a 10 pound test mono is a good start., I use stren, but you dont need to, you could use berkley xl as well its a good line too. 

 Now this next paragraph is very important

   When it comes to spooling the line you may want to search "spooling spinning reels"  or "re-spooling spinning reels" on this site,....as its a bit more involved than one would think,... and im pretty sure Glenn would have that here.,..

 The idea is not to twist the line all up when spooling., its easy to do, and will ruin your 1st outing quickly..,..If the search doesnt work out,...you can personal message me here,.. and I'll type it out for you.

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You didn't say whether you have a boat or not.

 

If you're fishing from shore that changes everything. Docks are great to fish from and fish if you have a boat. Two great lures that are cheap and easy to use are Zoom Super Flukes (I'd get some Owner Twistlock hooks in 3/0, 4/0, 5/0  to go with it) and Gary Yamamoto Senko worms in 5" with a hook of your choice, most likely an EWG in 4/0, or 5/0. 

 

Both these baits can be cast from shore or to shore and are effective, cheap, and found at any sporting good store including Walmart.

 

I also use Power Pro braid in yellow so I can see it on all my spinning and baitcasting rods. I'm not nearly as good a fisherman as most guys on here but this works well and keeps my costs down. I haven't put new line on any of my rods in 7 years. Every year I cut about a foot off because of abrasion or if I get caught up bad. I use 15lbs. on my spinning and 35lbs. on my baitcasting.

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Good post ^ but senkos are not cheap. They're the most expensive soft plastic I usually see on the shelves. 

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i think one of the most important things for a new bass fisherman to realize is that bass in most parts of the country eat 3 basic things. Those are shad, crawfish and bluegill/green sunfish. Most small private lakes don't have shad so crawfish and bluegill will be primary food sources. I always advise new anglers to try to match those colors with their lures to start. If the bass aren't eating those colors chances are they're not eating. If you are unsure as to what those natural colors are, start with black. I don't think black can ever be the wrong color. There may be many colors that will outperform black on a given day but I don't think black will ever be the wrong color. There are times when a bright loud color may be preferred (muddy water) but to start out I would stay with natural colors. When I first started bass fishing at 5 years old my Grandpa gave me a 4" black plastic worm and an 1/8 oz bullet weight. I caught a ton of fish dragging it on the bottom back then and still do now.

There are far too many ways to catch bass for anyone to really teach you on a forum. The hard fact is you will have to put in your time in on the water and figure out just like every one else. You will find it's trial and error. Pay attention to every detail of your cast and retrieve when fishing. Much of bass fishing is about trying to duplicate (pattern) what and where you did to catch your fish. Some times you will catch a bass by accident but most times you caught that fish by putting the right bait in the right place at the right depth with the right retrieve at the right time. Pay attention and do it again. Some times as soon as you think you have them figured out the whole deal changes and the trial starts again. That's fishing. A friend that has bass fishing experience may be able to take you fishing some or you may have a local bass club looking for non boaters. Both will help speed up the learning process.

In the mean time, go get some 4" worms and go fishing. Good luck

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On 10/17/2016 at 9:59 AM, Takemeoutside said:

haha I honestly couldnt tell you what fish are available. I'm not too sure. Im in Cleveland Ohio. Basically I could fish the neighborhood pond, Lake Erie or the Cuyahoga river. 

 

If you have access to a vehicle drive over to Conneaut creek in Ashtbula county. There you will be able to walk the creek. Throw inline spinners such as Roostertails in yellow or white and in the deeper holes fish senkos.

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7 hours ago, Yeajray231 said:

Good post ^ but senkos are not cheap. They're the most expensive soft plastic I usually see on the shelves. 

Correct. 

However, if you follow the guidelines in the below post one Senko may last up to a dozen fishing trips making the cost lower.

 

 

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@tcbass I get pretty good mileage out of my senkos. And I use the GYB usually . I can usually get 5 fish out of a worm if I TX rig. Then cut off about a 1/4" and re rig. But that doesn't make them any cheaper than a pack of dingers.. 

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