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Caliyak

Aluminum Frame reels

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I know that Academy, Bass Pro, Lews and Diawa make aluminum bc reels under $100. I came across Piscifun and *** that are selling reels at a lower rate. 

Here is my question; are all aluminum frame reels the same? meaning; is the aluminum weaker/stronger, one piece vs several pieces, thickness and so on. Or, is an aluminum frame reel from a reputable brand name better/the same than a no name brand? 

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Aluminum is just a metal, so it stands to reason that just because a reel says it has an aluminum frame doesn't mean it's comparable to another reel with the same claim. I'm sure there are about a million little things that could be different that may impact the reel's performance. Is the aluminum pure? Is it an alloy? What type of aluminum is it? Etc. I'd say that reels from brand names that carry a decent warranty are made of a higher quality aluminum than reels made by brand names with little to no warranty and/or knockoffs.

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I'm not sure what to think about carbon spinning reels.  I have two daiwa ballistics I scored in December for  $99 a pop.  Really like them....but I've seen a few posts  that have shown broken reels.  At first I thought maybe the posts were fake, but then I thought you couldn't even fake a broken reel like that if it were alumin.  I know Raul ******* about this...but I think he may be right.

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Cheap cast aluminum can be pretty porous and not all that strong. There are all different carbon fiber and graphite materials too . Long story short, material alone doesn't tell the whole story. 

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Die casting uses A360, A380, A383, A384, 518, A413, or B390

Cold Forging can use stronger 2024-T36, 2024-T4, 5052-H38, 6061-T6, or 7075-T6

Die casting can only have voids if the casting is done with metals in a molten state, which is not "Die Casting" but simply "Casting". Die Casting is forcing a metal in a softened (plastic) state into or through a "die".

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Die cast aluminum can have lots of porosity depending on how the molds are designed, heated and vented. Fishing reel frames should be designed without thin to thick wall that tend to be areas where porosity is a problem with die cast parts. So yes die cast aluminum can be porous and can be very dense depending on tooling design and proper casting techniques. 

Injection molding composite thermoplastic is also subject to porosity, thin to thick weak areas and requires good engineering and processing to produce a high quality part.

Tom

 

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Die casting can only have voids if the casting is done with metals in a molten state, which is not "Die Casting" but simply "Casting". Die Casting is forcing a metal in a softened (plastic) state into or through a "die". This where the confusion lies!

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The best reels are not cast, but machined from billet.  Maybe Catt knows where the billet comes from, or how that is made.  I don't believe too many bass reels are made this way, though there are a few that machined after molded (cast/die cast - I'm not sure what process reels use).

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