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What's the best on the water jump starter you folks are aware of? I've been looking at the WeeGo that Ike uses, but there are a number of cheaper ones. Some for under $50.

 

For those who don't know, this is a small handheld device to give a one-time jump start to an engine if the battery dies. Even if the battery is known to be good it's probably best to get a device like this to be used in case something weird happens.

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Don't know if it's "The Best" but I ordered this one last week.

Should be here tomorrow - reviews are decent.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B016UG6PWE/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

58dc7df154b70_NOCOGeniusBoostHDGB702000Amp12VUltraSafeLithiumJumpStarter.thumb.jpg.a0760808d92034ec0801ced3bfb02386.jpg

Preferred to have a unit that was rated sufficiently for the Boat (3.0 L) and the Truck (6.2 L).

A-Jay

 

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I have been boating for 42 years. I do my maintenance as needed. I have yet to need one of those on board.

 

If you start with good batteries ( high quality made batteries, not the cheapest ones)  and recharge them correctly, as soon as you return home, you should rarely need such a device.  Most times you would have need for one would be to help someone else who has failed to start with good batteries or failed to maintain them.

 

I run Cabelas group 30 series AGM batteries.  These 3 batteries are on their 7th season and are as good as they were when new.  I give credit to the Bass Pro on board charger that supplies 10 amps per battery and to charging them back up immediately after returning home from use.

 

These batteries are expensive to purchase. They run $249.99 each and go on sale almost every year for $199, which they are right now.  If they last 7 years then they cost $35 per year and never give me any issues.

 

Many anglers use the Wal Mart lead acid batteries that cost less than half that cost, then have to deal with replacing them annually or at least every other year.  To me, this is a pain and one I am not interested in.  I charge them up before I put them away and top them back up in spring and that is it. I never need a trickle charger left on them, or any other nonsense that can kill a battery.  That is just my 2 cents from owning and fishing from 11 bass boats, canoes and jon boats over 42 years.

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21 minutes ago, fishnkamp said:

I have been boating for 42 years. I do my maintenance as needed. I have yet to need one of those on board.

 

If you start with good batteries ( high quality made batteries, not the cheapest ones)  and recharge them correctly, as soon as you return home, you should rarely need such a device.  Most times you would have need for one would be to help someone else who has failed to start with good batteries or failed to maintain them.

 

I run Cabelas group 30 series AGM batteries.  These 3 batteries are on their 7th season and are as good as they were when new.  I give credit to the Bass Pro on board charger that supplies 10 amps per battery and to charging them back up immediately after returning home from use.

 

These batteries are expensive to purchase. They run $249.99 each and go on sale almost every year for $199, which they are right now.  If they last 7 years then they cost $35 per year and never give me any issues.

 

Many anglers use the Wal Mart lead acid batteries that cost less than half that cost, then have to deal with replacing them annually or at least every other year.  To me, this is a pain and one I am not interested in.  I charge them up before I put them away and top them back up in spring and that is it. I never need a trickle charger left on them, or any other nonsense that can kill a battery.  That is just my 2 cents from owning and fishing from 11 bass boats, canoes and jon boats over 42 years.

 

Until I get my battery maintenance under control I need to stick with the cheaper batteries. The other ones will last longer, and I have a good charger on my boat, but I seem to have trouble with batteries. Or, two of the batteries on my boat were not any good to begin with. One was brand new when I got the boat and he said the others were fine. It's probably more likely that they were all purchased at the same time and one simply went bad before the others. 

 

That said, I don't mind spending $200 a year on two batteries (starters tend to last longer, imho) than $500 every five years if I'm just going to ruin those $250 batteries within a couple of years. Once I learn and use the discipline to maintain my batteries properly and stop making stupid mistakes I'll look into better ones.

 

As for the jump starter, no - you should never need one. But the one time you need one and don't have one you'll wish you did. If I'm in a tournament and need to get back only to find my battery is bad then I'll be up a creek. Some are only $50. That's not much of an investment for piece of mind.

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On ‎4‎/‎4‎/‎2017 at 6:33 PM, fishnkamp said:

I have been boating for 42 years. I do my maintenance as needed. I have yet to need one of those on board.

 

If you start with good batteries ( high quality made batteries, not the cheapest ones)  and recharge them correctly, as soon as you return home, you should rarely need such a device.  Most times you would have need for one would be to help someone else who has failed to start with good batteries or failed to maintain them.

 

I run Cabelas group 30 series AGM batteries.  These 3 batteries are on their 7th season and are as good as they were when new.  I give credit to the Bass Pro on board charger that supplies 10 amps per battery and to charging them back up immediately after returning home from use.

 

These batteries are expensive to purchase. They run $249.99 each and go on sale almost every year for $199, which they are right now.  If they last 7 years then they cost $35 per year and never give me any issues.

 

Many anglers use the Wal Mart lead acid batteries that cost less than half that cost, then have to deal with replacing them annually or at least every other year.  To me, this is a pain and one I am not interested in.  I charge them up before I put them away and top them back up in spring and that is it. I never need a trickle charger left on them, or any other nonsense that can kill a battery.  That is just my 2 cents from owning and fishing from 11 bass boats, canoes and jon boats over 42 years.

 

This is exactly why I ordered the unit.

A-Jay

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 I would just get three brand new batteries and stop fussing with batteries that are questionable.

Instead of a battery jump kit, I would recommend you go to Harbor Freight and buy one of these battery load testers.  You will know if any of the batteries on your boat work without any doubt.  You are waiting for your battery charger to indicate if they will take a charge.  Depending on the condition of the batteries internal plates your charger may never give you a correct indication. I would temporarily disconnect the jumper lead between the two trolling motor batteries (assuming it is setup for 24 volts) Test each battery isolated from the other one.

This is your only reliable way to test them.  One of these testers runs $21.00

http://www.harborfreight.com/100-amp-6-volt12-volt-battery-load-tester-69888-9191.html

Cen-Tech® 69888 100 Amp  6 Volt/12 Volt Battery Load Tester 

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27 minutes ago, fishnkamp said:

 I would just get three brand new batteries and stop fussing with batteries that are questionable.

Instead of a battery jump kit, I would recommend you go to Harbor Freight and buy one of these battery load testers.  You will know if any of the batteries on your boat work without any doubt.  You are waiting for your battery charger to indicate if they will take a charge.  Depending on the condition of the batteries internal plates your charger may never give you a correct indication. I would temporarily disconnect the jumper lead between the two trolling motor batteries (assuming it is setup for 24 volts) Test each battery isolated from the other one.

This is your only reliable way to test them.  One of these testers runs $21.00

http://www.harborfreight.com/100-amp-6-volt12-volt-battery-load-tester-69888-9191.html

Cen-Tech® 69888 100 Amp  6 Volt/12 Volt Battery Load Tester 

i can appreciate your battery maintenance plan and battery choices but sometimes people just simply forget and leave an accessory on or a good battery just simply fails.  i'll take my jump box just in case or to help a fellow angler in need.  

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I used to think like that and always pride myself on maintaining and buying top quality batteries.   But last week, I charged up(onboard), and went to the lake the next morning and ran the trim to take off the motormate.   When I put in, it went "click".   Battery went bad, I used it the week before OK.   This (battery plus duracell) battery was only 2+ years old.  I bought one of those lithium power supplies at the Classic and never used it, but it saved me three times that day.   I'm not sure what the brand name is, but its the same guys that make the lithium TM batteries.   I recharge it twice a year, and it's three + years old now.   Can power your phone or other devices. 

I run one of those switches that charges the TM batteries after the starter is up.   You can use for days without recharge.   But I always top up.

I carry jumper cables from my tournament days, as you can almost always jump off the troll motor batts or someone on the water.   I was only ever completely dead once in 30+ years going to weigh in.   A battery can get so low/bad cell it won't jump.   That was on the Chesapeake Bay and no one around.   I had to get towed.   I wonder now if this device would have prevented?  

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Those load testers pictured above can get real hot when testing a battery. Since most batteries are kept in the same storage area as the fuel tank on most boats I'd recommend removing the batteries prior to testing. This will also lessen the damage if a battery were to explode while being load tested. It happens from time to time, just like when jump starting a battery, as I've seen over 18 yrs of working with them. It's infrequent but it happens. 

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38 minutes ago, fishnkamp said:

 I would just get three brand new batteries and stop fussing with batteries that are questionable.

Instead of a battery jump kit, I would recommend you go to Harbor Freight and buy one of these battery load testers.  You will know if any of the batteries on your boat work without any doubt.  You are waiting for your battery charger to indicate if they will take a charge.  Depending on the condition of the batteries internal plates your charger may never give you a correct indication. I would temporarily disconnect the jumper lead between the two trolling motor batteries (assuming it is setup for 24 volts) Test each battery isolated from the other one.

This is your only reliable way to test them.  One of these testers runs $21.00

http://www.harborfreight.com/100-amp-6-volt12-volt-battery-load-tester-69888-9191.html 

 

I may get something like that, and I do like the idea of getting three new batteries. However one of the batteries is fine. Charges up well after I gave it a jump start with an external charger at 50 amps. The onboard charger won't charge a completely dead battery.

 

That's was the starter as I wouldn't put 50 amps on the trolling batteries. I put a trickle charge on them at 2 amps hoping for the same results, but they were both underwater all winter and so I fear that they are bad. They'll run the trolling motor without any apparent loss in speed for a half hour or more, but I just don't trust them. Not that I'd be DOA if the trolling motor was out, but it would ruin a day fishing.

 

I'm going to get some Exide batteries from TSC and use them for the season. If I can get them through next season then I'll bite the bullet and buy some good batteries.

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1 hour ago, fishnkamp said:

 I would just get three brand new batteries and stop fussing with batteries that are questionable.

Instead of a battery jump kit, I would recommend you go to Harbor Freight and buy one of these battery load testers.  You will know if any of the batteries on your boat work without any doubt.  You are waiting for your battery charger to indicate if they will take a charge.  Depending on the condition of the batteries internal plates your charger may never give you a correct indication. I would temporarily disconnect the jumper lead between the two trolling motor batteries (assuming it is setup for 24 volts) Test each battery isolated from the other one.

This is your only reliable way to test them.  One of these testers runs $21.00

http://www.harborfreight.com/100-amp-6-volt12-volt-battery-load-tester-69888-9191.html

Cen-Tech® 69888 100 Amp  6 Volt/12 Volt Battery Load Tester 

Old school toaster :headbang:

I've got a Black n Decker jump box with 1000 peak amps that has sat on my boat unused for 4 years. Rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

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Old school and reliable!  I do not care if it is a construction equipment battery or one in a truck, lawnmower, boat or camper, these simple testers work.  If a cell is dying it will show up quick.

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i have not had one I several years for my boat so, I can not comment on the newer, smaller jump starters. I had one of the big ones you get at the automotive stores which lasted me 3 years. I paid $75ish for it. it had a lot of cold cranking amps. I would use it in the boat on the weekends and then in my work vehicle during the week. It was rechargeable and I could go 3 months without charging it. one of the greatest things I ever purchased.

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I carry jumper cables in my boat

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17 hours ago, fishnkamp said:

 I would just get three brand new batteries and stop fussing with batteries that are questionable.

Instead of a battery jump kit, I would recommend you go to Harbor Freight and buy one of these battery load testers.  You will know if any of the batteries on your boat work without any doubt.  You are waiting for your battery charger to indicate if they will take a charge.  Depending on the condition of the batteries internal plates your charger may never give you a correct indication. I would temporarily disconnect the jumper lead between the two trolling motor batteries (assuming it is setup for 24 volts) Test each battery isolated from the other one.

This is your only reliable way to test them.  One of these testers runs $21.00

http://www.harborfreight.com/100-amp-6-volt12-volt-battery-load-tester-69888-9191.html

Cen-Tech® 69888 100 Amp  6 Volt/12 Volt Battery Load Tester 

3 of your AGM batteries will cost $600-$750. A good jump pack and a piece of mind around $100. Some people might not have the funds immediately to invest that kind of money into batteries right away.

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I think maybe you misunderstand my entire point.  The idea that the OP would rather depend on a backup device such as a jump starter RATHER than start with 3 good batteries is ridiculous.  He has at least two other topics about the batteries on his boat or possible charger issues. I helped him find that boat last year. So I have been trying to help him all along. 

 

He has said numerous times that the dealer supposedly replaced one faulty battery, but he is not confident which one.

 

I realize my battery choice is expensive at first. If you spend $200 on a battery that can last 7 years than it cost $29 per year.  Boating, especially bass boating is not a cheap hobby.  But safety requires the use of dependable equipment.  

If that initial outlay is too much,  than find something like the Wal Mart brand AGMs and replace all 3. 

 

MY the main point was to avoid starting a season relying on batteries that will fail or you can not confidently trust.  

Troubleshooting devices like the one I suggested are used all through the mechanics world to reliably evaluate the condition of a battery.  Every professional shop that I have worked in has used them. I have been employed as a mechanic in car shops, diesel engine shops, and construction repair shops.  I would rather go spend $30 and test the batteries to be certain the plates are not dying then guess.  Since this is his first full season I would just start with 3 good batteries, maintain them and not have to worry about their reliability. 

Another thing to consider is with today's computer controlled engines trying to start one with a low battery could damage the electronic controls. You could also damage an outboard charging system if it is trying to charge a bad battery.   Those repairs could be much more expensive in the long run.  

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Buy good gear - Take care of it - Have a fall back plan.

 

A-Jay

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Batteries are just too dang cheap to mess around with when you look at the headaches they can cause.  I replace cranking batteries every three years in my vehicles and boats with the biggest, baddest battery I can get to fit and have never had one failed to start because of a dead battery.  I have had a couple of no starts because of bad connections that I was able to fix rather easily, but never a dead battery.

I bought my first power boat, a 14' GlassMaster with a 65hp Merc in 1965.  That was before the days of onboard chargers and battery maintainers.  Every spring I would put a new cranking battery in it.

For that past many years, I either have onboard chargers in my boats that stay on 24/7 or BatteryMinders on the vehicles I don't regularly drive. 

I just replaced the three year old battery in my wife's Toyota HighLander.  It's classified as a 700CCA battery.  When it was new, it was testing at 780CCA, after three years use, it was testing at 455CCA.  While that's more than enough to crank the vehicle for now, with summer just around the corner and hot weather creates the most problems for batteries, why screw around with it.  I put that one in my welder and a new one in her car. 

 

Now, as for wasting the money on a Jump Box, putting that money in a good set of jumper cables would make much more since. Those things usually only work on batteries to weak to turn a motor fast enough, and is pulling the voltage down to low for the ignition system, and they only give you a couple of seconds of boost, so if the motor does not start readily, you are back to square one. 

If it's not cranking because of a failed battery, open or shorted plate, and won't crank the motor over at all, those things are going to be useless, where a good set of jumper cables off a TM battery will usually get you going. 

Understand one other thing, if the jumper cables have cable smaller than #6, they are junk and will not carry enough current to crank a dead battery.  I personally would not waste my money on a set of jumper cables that aren't at least #2 battery cable.  If you can't take the battery out of a vehicle (or disconnect the battery cables) and connect jumper cable to them and crank the vehicle, the jumper cables are too small.  Smaller motors etc that don't require huge CCA's will start fine with #6 cable, but larger motors and most vehicles will need larger cable. 

 

 

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The jump start device isn't for use with trolling motor batteries, it's to jump start your big engine in an emergency. Today's sonar units, livewell pumps etc. use a lot of amps and if you make shorter run on the lake the big OB charging system may not keep the cranking battery charged. All you need to do is have a problem and be isolated from help, be prepared. Do you know how to jump start using 24V or 36V trolling motor batteries?

AGM's are basically maintenance free, keep the terminals clean and sealed, don't over charge them, they last over 5 years. You need a high quality on board charger like Norco Genius or Dual Pro and it's a plug in system...yes you do need to remember to plug in and to check on the next day.

Tom

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As the OP, let me clear a few things up. 

 

First, I would want one of these jump starters even if I got new batteries. Recently I read a story about how a guy accidentally left his bilge pump on all day and his starter died. He either had a backup or used the deep cells. Yet it goes to show - things happen. It could be a brand new battery that tests fine, but something can always go wrong. So regardless of the state of my batteries I will be getting one of these devices. Maybe I'll have run down my trolling motor batteries to where there aren't enough starting amps to jump the battery after the starter dies. Who knows? It's just one more measure of safety. I am NOT buying this device to compensate for my batteries' current condition.

 

Second, I will be getting new batteries. I'm not sure if I'll get a new starter battery as that has been charged up nicely, but definitely the trolling motor batteries. My main point about the price is yes - it is a factor in and of itself. However I have not had a good year with batteries. Through faults of my own I probably ruined both of the deep cells, both by not charging them over the winter, keeping them in the boat, and also through keeping the plug in the boat and letting them underwater for I don't know how long. It was stupid. I am not proud of myself and it shows a lack of care for proper maintenance. I'll try to do better. Until I can reliably take care of batteries I will not be spending $250 each on them. I will buy the cheaper ones that typically last two years with good maintenance. If I can get them to two years THEN I will consider myself competent enough to spend some good money on batteries. Yet, if I can't manage to get them through a season then I'm throwing the money away on more expensive batteries. 

 

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3 hours ago, Zeeter said:

As the OP, let me clear a few things up. 

 

First, I would want one of these jump starters even if I got new batteries. So regardless of the state of my batteries I will be getting one of these devices.

 

Second, I will be getting new batteries. Through faults of my own I probably ruined both of the deep cells, both by not charging them over the winter, keeping them in the boat, and also through keeping the plug in the boat and letting them underwater for I don't know how long. . I'll try to do better.

 

 

You learned some things (experience).

You shared this and no doubt helped others.

You'll be fine.

A-Jay

 

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On 4/4/2017 at 8:59 PM, slonezp said:

Rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it.

 

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