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slonezp

Need some help.

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In a few weeks I will be volunteering at https://sites.google.com/site/youthdaygamefair/ to teach kids from the ages of 5-15 how to cast a baitcaster. @cadman will be there as well. There will be multiple stations covering different types of casting/fishing as well as archery and shooting sports.  The way the time is structured the kids will be moving from station to station every 45 minutes. With each group I will have about 15 minutes to go over Knots, line choice, identifying cover/structure, bait choice etc. and then 1/2 hours teaching the kids how to cast a baitcaster. What I would like to do is put together a one page handout with a lot of the fishing basics that the kids will understand and take home with them to reference in the future. What do you guys think is/are important topics to cover for beginners? Maybe choosing the right rod/reel, Why pick one line over another why pick dark color baits over bright color and vice versa. Maybe basic must haves in a tackle bag/box tackle. Please suggest general tips and not bass or species specific tips. Thanks

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How old are the kids involved? The information that they can realistically process is largely dependent on their age. 

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There's a lot of debate on line choice and not sure there is a wrong answer 

As far as knots, KISS and only teach the Uni/ Uni-Uni

Techniques, worms ( Texas and wacky), CB, and surface. Almost everything else relates to these skills

 

......Difference between spinning and CB

 

Hope this helps and thanks for doing this

Al

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@slonezp: First, Bravo Zulu for your effort! I've had relatively little experience with youth fishing, but would you consider including a brief blurb reminding them to respect both fish and environment (picking up their litter, getting adult help taking a fish off the hook, catch-and-release philosophy)? Even at the age of five you can introduce them to some basic habits that may stick with them as they grow.

 

@NHBull: Just curious, but not disagreeing. Why the Uni-knot as opposed to the Palomar knot? Makes sense because the Zuni-knot is definitely more versatile, but for my aging fingers the Palomar is easier to tie. Good stuff though!

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1 hour ago, GrumpyOlPhartte said:

@slonezp: First, Bravo Zulu for your effort! I've had relatively little experience with youth fishing, but would you consider including a brief blurb reminding them to respect both fish and environment (picking up their litter, getting adult help taking a fish off the hook, catch-and-release philosophy)? Even at the age of five you can introduce them to some basic habits that may stick with them as they grow.

 

@NHBull: Just curious, but not disagreeing. Why the Uni-knot as opposed to the Palomar knot? Makes sense because the Zuni-knot is definitely more versatile, but for my aging fingers the Palomar is easier to tie. Good stuff though!

Given the time allotted, it is the only knots that joins 2 lines and can be used for terminal tackle.  It is easy and strong...when doubled it is a 100% knot....kids prefer black and white and those staying in the sport will pursue others naturally.

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3 hours ago, BrackishBassin said:

How old are the kids involved? The information that they can realistically process is largely dependent on their age. 

5 to 15

2 hours ago, GrumpyOlPhartte said:

@slonezp: First, Bravo Zulu for your effort! I've had relatively little experience with youth fishing, but would you consider including a brief blurb reminding them to respect both fish and environment (picking up their litter, getting adult help taking a fish off the hook, catch-and-release philosophy)? Even at the age of five you can introduce them to some basic habits that may stick with them as they grow.

 

@NHBull: Just curious, but not disagreeing. Why the Uni-knot as opposed to the Palomar knot? Makes sense because the Zuni-knot is definitely more versatile, but for my aging fingers the Palomar is easier to tie. Good stuff though!

Great addition, didn't een cross my mind

There are 3 other stations that will be introducing them to spin casting, spinning, and fly casting

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2 hours ago, GrumpyOlPhartte said:

@slonezp: First, Bravo Zulu for your effort! I've had relatively little experience with youth fishing, but would you consider including a brief blurb reminding them to respect both fish and environment (picking up their litter, getting adult help taking a fish off the hook, catch-and-release philosophy)? Even at the age of five you can introduce them to some basic habits that may stick with them as they grow.

 

@NHBull: Just curious, but not disagreeing. Why the Uni-knot as opposed to the Palomar knot? Makes sense because the Zuni-knot is definitely more versatile, but for my aging fingers the Palomar is easier to tie. Good stuff though!

Given the time allotted, it is the only knots that joins 2 lines and can be used for terminal tackle.  It is easy and strong...when doubled it is a 100% knot....kids prefer black and white and those staying in the sport will pursue others naturally.

 

 

 

Note.....one thing beginner fishermen should learn is to how to get the hook out of a gut hooked fish.....it is a huge problem for beginners 

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Wow! That's a huge range. I would maybe think about making two different hand outs. One for the 5-10 group and one for the 10-15. For 5-10, keep it really simple. Maybe just the parts of a fishing rod and the names of some common tackle (hook, bobber, bait, etc.). Anything else would be way too complicated foe them. You can get much more specific with the older group, but I would still suggest steering clear of the color baits for specific types of water conditions. If they're new to fishing, maybe talk about different types of freshwater fish and one good bait for each type. 

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You're going to teach kids how to use a baitcaster  ,? I recommend buying the cheapest spool of bulk mono-filament available .

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22 minutes ago, scaleface said:

You're going to teach kids how to use a baitcaster  ,? I recommend buying the cheapest spool of bulk mono-filament available .

Are you saying I'm a bad teacher? :D The equipment will be supplied by the organization and I believe most was donated.

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Maybe keep it basic,due to time constraints. 

Show them a t-rigged worm.

Teach them to have some fun.

Answer some questions ect.

Your a good man for donating your time.

As far as a print out, how to clear a backlash,lol.

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Maybe talk about the 3 classes of baits as they apply to the water column (bottom, middle and topwater) and finding which one is the most effective when/where you are fishing. 

 

Awareness of whats around you when you cast. This may coming in handy during the 1/2 hour of teaching.

 

Don't toss used plastic baits into the water. 

 

 

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That is a lot to cover in a short time.

Pick 1 knot and 1 line.

I would show them to rig a weedless soft plastic worm with sliding bullet weight and use that to show how to tie the knot.

You might want to consider teaching how to cast with a spinning outfit to start with.

Remember kids listen and learn faster then adults, their hand eye coordination is limited at ages 5 to 7.

Know your audience, think about 2 things you want them to remember.

Tom

 

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I do a lot of seminars, in-store promos and presentations at bass clubs as well as captain for a high school team. I have found that the Keep it simple principle works best. If these kids have a very limited knowledge of fishing keep it very basic or they will be more confused than when they got there. I would show a few basic knots, and rigs that are simple like a texas rig worm, wacky style trick worm or Senko style bait, or just chunkin and winding a crankbait like a KVD 1.5 or Rat L Trap. Also show them the basic weights and hooks they will need. Good Luck, and Have Fun:D

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those kids are gonna love you

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We do quite a few of these. Unless it is a requirement, go with spinning gear instead of BCs. The uni and palomar are 2 of the easiest knots to tie, so that's a good way to go. Keep it short and sweet, specially for the younger ones. If they aren't actually fishing remove (or clip the points) from trebles.

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29 minutes ago, reason said:

We do quite a few of these. Unless it is a requirement, go with spinning gear instead of BCs. The uni and palomar are 2 of the easiest knots to tie, so that's a good way to go. Keep it short and sweet, specially for the younger ones. If they aren't actually fishing remove (or clip the points) from trebles.

There will be others teaching spinning and spin casting

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Don't forget lead safety, wash hands after handling lures/weights, don't put in mouth, etc.

 

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This is what I've come up with so far. Mind you I will only have 10-15 minutes of "lecture" before physically showing them how to use a baitcaster

 

Respect the fish, the sport, the environment

·         Treat the fish with care and carefully release whatever you don’t intend to eat

·         Clean up after yourselves and the trash that others leave behind.

·         Follow creel limits, slot limits, state and local regulations

Rod and reel choice

·         Ultralight and light action for panfish, small trout and small gamefish

·         Medium action for bass, walleye, and other gamefish

·         Heavy action for large fish like salmon and carp

·         Technique specific like a fly rod or a flipping stick

·         Spin casting and spinning combos for lighter presentations. Baitcasting for heavier presentations

Line characteristics

·         Monofilament-sinks slowly and stretches, softer and more pliable then flouro, has memory

·         Fluorocarbon- sinks and does not stretch, invisible to fish stiffer than mono has low memory

·         Braid or superline-floats and does not stretch, no memory, needs scissors or clippers to cut

·         XX pound test- the minimum amount of force which may cause the line to break

Terminal tackle

·         Hooks, come in long shank, short shank multiple sizes and technique specific

·         Jigs, come in different weights styles and colors

·         Weights, come in different styles, use the lightest one you can get away with

·         Bobbers, come in round and pencil styles use the smallest size you can get away with

Lure choice

·         Match the hatch

·         Darker colors for low light and overcast days and stained water

·         Bright colors for bright skies

·         Natural colors for clear water

Lure types

·         Spinners

·         Spinnerbaits

·         Jigs and swimjigs

·         Soft plastics, worms creature baits, crawfish

·         Hard plastics, crankbaits, jerkbaits

·         Topwater, frogs poppers, buzzbaits

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That could a few hours.

I hesitate to make this comment and know anglers believe FC doesn't strecth and mono does...that is false statement, both stretch under strain about equal %.  FC sinks and fish can't see it is true. Mono tends to float or suspend and has less memory is true.

Good luck with your presentation, teaching kids to fish and take care of their environment is well worth the time and effort.

Tom

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Slow, I suggest showing the kids how to "balance a baitcaster" with the rod's parameters, line test and bait weight.

 

By teaching them how to balance a baitcasting rig they will learn how to avoid and minimize backlashes and get the most production out of the setup.

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For lure choice, I would personally preface it with, "The best lure/color is the one you like/want to throw, but if the bite is tough, try______________"

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