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haggard

Why M action for crank/swim/trebles? Just the hook size?

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I've done a lot of searching on this and from what I read, a moderate/medium action rod is often recommend for treble hook lures (, swim baits, crank baits), maybe even drop shot techniques, because you're less likely to pull the hook out of the fish's mouth.

 

But that's where the explanations typically end.

 

Is this because of the hook size? Typically smaller hooks on a treble or a drop shot rig compared to what you might use on a Texas rig, for example, and the thinner hook is easier to tear the fish?

 

So then if one was to replace the treble with a single, slight larger hook, would the "need" for a moderate action rod be moot?

 

Or if one was to be very careful on the hook set on a drop shot, again, would the moderate action be moot and you could get away with your, say, fast action rod?

 

 

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I'm not familiar with a moderate action being utilized for drop shots. I use that technique a lot and I'm using either fast or extra fast action rods. Now for crankbaits depending on what type of line you are using a moderate action rod comes in handy from pulling hooks. If you are familiar with the bend from a moderate rod it's more in the middle of the rod where fast and extra fast are more at the tip so more of a direct response on the lure when you set the hook. I hope this helps.

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Moderate is used for trebble baits to keep the rod loaded during the fight.  It also helps keep the smaller hook on a trebble from tearing out.  Medium is a good all around power because it loads easy for casting.  Trying to toss a shadrap sr-5 on a medium heavy would be a no go.  If you stick to larger baits a medium heavy might be better.  Dropshot is an entirely diffrent animal where you want a fast action with really soft tip.  I ds with a 2 power but 3 power rods can be good to.  

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I'll mention something about moderate actions being nice for cranks besides tearing out hooks or fighting fish. You can load a moderate action rod more and easier on your back cast with lighter lures resulting in longer distances if your casting mechanics are good. They key for cranking is depth and the longer cast you can make the deeper it will dive. With that said, most Crankbaits cast well these days but if you are fighting wind or really need that extra distance/depth a moderate action will help you out. 

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31 minutes ago, Fishin' Fool said:

I'm not familiar with a moderate action being utilized for drop shots.

In retrospect... I could be wrong about moderate action on drop shots.

26 minutes ago, Angry John said:

Moderate is used for trebble baits to keep the rod loaded during the fight. 

Okay so this is kinda where I'm getting at. Doesn't this rationale apply to any lure type, not just treble hook lures? Wouldn't you want to keep the rod loaded during the fight for every technique and lure type?

 

What is it about treble hook lures that makes it harder to keep the rod loaded than say a TX rig worm or a single hook swimbait?

 

I can't help thinking it all comes down to the hook size, but I can't seem to find any confirmation or explanation.

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14 minutes ago, haggard said:

In retrospect... I could be wrong about moderate action on drop shots.

Okay so this is kinda where I'm getting at. Doesn't this rationale apply to any lure type, not just treble hook lures? Wouldn't you want to keep the rod loaded during the fight for every technique and lure type?

 

What is it about treble hook lures that makes it harder to keep the rod loaded than say a TX rig worm or a single hook swimbait?

 

I can't help thinking it all comes down to the hook size, but I can't seem to find any confirmation or explanation.

Hook size both length and gauge of wire. Also hook gap. Distance between the shank and hook point. Imo it's much more likely to have a bass skin hooked on a small treble or drop shot hook than on a regular worm/ewg/flipping hook. Also treble/multi hooked baits are moving baits and are prone to having a bass "slap" at them. So a good percentage of the time the bass will have trebled both inside and outside of its mouth and you won't have a great hookup which in turn the moderate rod stays loaded easier helping the hooks stay pinned when a fish head shakes or jumps or surges at the boat/bank.

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The first thing is hook size as stated.  When I get a 4/0 flipping hook buried in a fish I own it.  A crank bait has smaller hooks and the weight of the bait can be leveraged to pop out the hook.  Hook placement is also a factor but I don't foul hook a fish very often.  

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I use a MH/M for my crankbaits. I don't fish them often, but when I do it's usually around heavy cover where I need to move the fish or risk losing them. I can cast a 100 series Bandit with my MH very easily. I've had M/M cranking rods and always found them to be lighter than what I liked (St. Croix and Loomis). Currently using a Quantum KVD Tour cranking rod in the 7' MH/M, it's one of my 2 favorite cranking rods I've owned. Has the good blend of being soft enough to load even with smaller baits and not pull hooks on a lightly hooked fish, while being powerful enough to move a big fish away from a laydown or brushpile when I need it to. 

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I use 2 different rod for crankbaits depending on the lure size and diving depths.

Try cranking a DD22 with a medium power crankbait rod, more lure resistance then the rod can overcome.

The reason I use moderate action MH & H power rods for crankbaits is they helps me detect strikes watching/feeling the rod tip movements, stiffer rod tips tend to deaden the lures movements and pull the lure out of the basses mouth before you can set the hook.

Tom

 

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I crank with either a 7', 7'4" or 7'10" Med Hvy Quantum Tour KVD Cranking rod,  depending on the presentation & application.  (Seen here in my hand & on deck) 

 The composite blanks blend of E-Glass and carbon delivers the parabolic glass actions I prefer without sacrificing sensitivity and backbone that carbon provides.    

Image may contain: one or more people, ocean, sky, cloud, outdoor, water and nature

 

And something that is often not mentioned is that these rods will launch a bait quite a ways with minimal effort.  I really enjoy that.

 

:smiley:

A-Jay

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The moderate rod flexes "easier" when loaded. That and mono filament line allow bass to suck the bait in.

 

 

Also, during the fight, the rod absorbs surges taking pressure off the hook. It also absorbs the weight of the lure during head shake.

 

I use 4 different rods, they are broken down by lure weight. A 3 power up to a 7 power for big cranks and shads....

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Medium refers to the power of a rod and moderate refers to the action. I choose the appropriate power according to weight of the lure and depth it dives to. I choose moderate or moderate/fast rods for treble/crank baits because I want to keep the small trebles pinned in the fish.

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