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Palmering Marabou Jigs


Will Wetline

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OkobojiEagle's post, "Stacking Marabou vs. Palmering," rekindled my interest in working with this fine feather.

 

https://www.bassresource.com/bass-fishing-forums/topic/245309-stacking-marabou-vs-palmering/#comment-2815248

 

In the past, I had gotten frustrated working with this fluffy stuff so, before making another mess, I did some research and turned up one excellent video and a second well worth watching:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WjQkfU_cSQ

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPUotb8qN4w

 

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Let's start by looking at a few items on the bench. Clockwise from 12:00, you see a jar of head cement which penetrates well and is more controllable than thin super glue. Next is a cut down strap with a tab of velcro on the end used to smooth out ruffled feathers. You definitely want a waste container. Above the bobbin with a spool of 210 thread is J. Stockard's Deluxe Hackle Plier which opens much easier than English hackle pliers.

 

https://www.jsflyfishing.com/products/hackle-plier-deluxe?variant=43244906447077&gclid=Cj0KCQjw2cWgBhDYARIsALggUhrokqLaKRzhhSRTdpZgi1aejOYIT0CTWrpJy-1-OVe6HbPhHfX-8jAaAiaOEALw_wcB

 

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Here's a 3/32 oz. Midwest Finesse head with an Owner 5313 size 1 hook. Continue the thread base down the shank if you want to add a wire bait keeper (Do-it WB-800) for a piece of soft plastic.

 

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This is the marabou you want. $4.15/pk. from J. Stockard.

 

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Full, fluffy, thin-stemmed. Note the curves in the stems.

 

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Wetting the tops will keep individual feathers (barbs) out of the way when tying in. Stroke and hold back the rest best you can. Leave enough stem to grasp with hackle pliers.

 

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Around and around she goes. Smooth the feathers back as you wrap. Don't set the hook in your flesh. Patience thin? Take a break and remind yourself that tools can be bought but patience must be developed.

 

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First feather tied off and second progressing. Be careful not to wet feathers yet to be wrapped but you can dampen a couple of fingers and stroke down those already secured. 

 

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Saturate the finished wraps with head cement.

 

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Have your wondered how these delicate offerings hold up? The jig on the left is fresh out of the vise. The one on the right looks battle weary and it is. Many retrieves have dragged it slowly over sand, rock, rubble, and along the way it had been taken by five smallies. It will be back in action when my season starts in a few weeks.

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Thanks a lot for you post WW.  I am new to tying hair jigs and have only dabbled in 4-leggers' tails so far, but been curious about doing feathers.  This will be a great reference point for me!

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 .To add to the knowledge base, marabou can be bought many ways.

As part of a full patch or in small bags.

They come and are labeled as strung, blood quill or select and wooly bugger.

Blood quills arevthe best for palmering.

Most often you stack the tails and palmer the body.

If you want classic minnow colours tones then you have to stack them as a rule.

Always have the densest area be at the head, use tapering for a better swim.

 

Edit - smalljaw is the forum master of marabou  he has a youtube channel worth watching.

 

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  • Super User

For the life of me I cannot tie anything! Jigs, guides, whatever. Your stuff always looks great so I try again only to realize why I quit in the first place.

 

 

Allen

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  • 3 weeks later...

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Palmered on the left, stacked on the right. As good as the Hareline blood quills are, there's lots of marabou left to tie in line with the shank.

 

I've got a good supply of marabou jigs to start the season, mostly black/purple and brown/burnt orange, so now it's goodbye to fussy feathers and on to spinnerbait making.

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Good write up.  being a fly fisherman and tyer I have worked with marabou a lot and you nailed it.  I will also add that stacked versus palmered achieve different things.  Stacking is pretty straight forward and one thing that helps when palmering is to wrap and then after each wrap stroke the fibers back with wet fingers.  Holds them in place and makes it easier to deal with.  

Great material though.

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20 hours ago, Will Wetline said:

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Palmered on the left, stacked on the right. As good as the Hareline blood quills are, there's lots of marabou left to tie in line with the shank.

 

I've got a good supply of marabou jigs to start the season, mostly black/purple and brown/burnt orange, so now it's goodbye to fussy feathers and on to spinnerbait making.

What water temp you start throwing yours at?

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2 hours ago, Bdnoble84 said:

What water temp you start throwing yours at?

Last year was the first time I fished palmered marabou and the water temp was 47º on their first outing.

Review: 

I would certainly try them at a colder temperature, along with bucktail and bear, but remember a key to successful presentation is to work them very slowly.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • Super User
On 3/15/2023 at 7:04 PM, Will Wetline said:

OkobojiEagle's post, "Stacking Marabou vs. Palmering," rekindled my interest in working with this fine feather.

 

https://www.bassresource.com/bass-fishing-forums/topic/245309-stacking-marabou-vs-palmering/#comment-2815248

 

In the past, I had gotten frustrated working with this fluffy stuff so, before making another mess, I did some research and turned up one excellent video and a second well worth watching:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WjQkfU_cSQ

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPUotb8qN4w

 

spacer.png

 

Let's start by looking at a few items on the bench. Clockwise from 12:00, you see a jar of head cement which penetrates well and is more controllable than thin super glue. Next is a cut down strap with a tab of velcro on the end used to smooth out ruffled feathers. You definitely want a waste container. Above the bobbin with a spool of 210 thread is J. Stockard's Deluxe Hackle Plier which opens much easier than English hackle pliers.

 

https://www.jsflyfishing.com/products/hackle-plier-deluxe?variant=43244906447077&gclid=Cj0KCQjw2cWgBhDYARIsALggUhrokqLaKRzhhSRTdpZgi1aejOYIT0CTWrpJy-1-OVe6HbPhHfX-8jAaAiaOEALw_wcB

 

spacer.png

 

Here's a 3/32 oz. Midwest Finesse head with an Owner 5313 size 1 hook. Continue the thread base down the shank if you want to add a wire bait keeper (Do-it WB-800) for a piece of soft plastic.

 

spacer.png

 

This is the marabou you want. $4.15/pk. from J. Stockard.

 

spacer.png

 

Full, fluffy, thin-stemmed. Note the curves in the stems.

 

spacer.png

 

Wetting the tops will keep individual feathers (barbs) out of the way when tying in. Stroke and hold back the rest best you can. Leave enough stem to grasp with hackle pliers.

 

spacer.png

 

Around and around she goes. Smooth the feathers back as you wrap. Don't set the hook in your flesh. Patience thin? Take a break and remind yourself that tools can be bought but patience must be developed.

 

spacer.png

 

First feather tied off and second progressing. Be careful not to wet feathers yet to be wrapped but you can dampen a couple of fingers and stroke down those already secured. 

 

spacer.png

 

Saturate the finished wraps with head cement.

 

spacer.png

 

Have your wondered how these delicate offerings hold up? The jig on the left is fresh out of the vise. The one on the right looks battle weary and it is. Many retrieves have dragged it slowly over sand, rock, rubble, and along the way it had been taken by five smallies. It will be back in action when my season starts in a few weeks.

Great tutorial! thanks,

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  • 1 month later...
On 4/14/2023 at 7:26 AM, Bassbum1016 said:

Interesting and informative 

I will definitely have to try this 

I’ve been layering all along 

0566593C-5B0F-4790-8D42-408E39EAFE3F.jpeg

Depends on quality of the material. If i have plumes with nice long wispy fibers and a good flexible shaft im definitely palmering. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Bdnoble84 said:

Depends on quality of the material. If i have plumes with nice long wispy fibers and a good flexible shaft im definitely palmering. 

 

 

you can soak the fibers to get the stem more flexible but it is always better to find those great plumes for palmering.  I do find that palmering is a little less durable than stacking though.

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