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Bassn Blvd

New reel / tackle......

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Well, I returned my new Revo SX that blew up while putting line on it to BPS.  They gave me store credit with no questions asked.

The clerk from the reel dept. said he has not had a Revo returned yet, much less with a blown sidecap and spool.

I fingered the Revo STX and the Curado 100dsv for about 30 minutes comparing them.  I went with the Curado since I already have the 200DHSV and know how dependable they are.  

What made my mind up was the Curado is an ounce lighter than the STX and it is also made for saltwater which the STX isn't. I like to trout and redfish also.

It was only $50 more than the SX and same price as the STX.  But I didn't get off that cheap.  I told the clerk to ring up the difference when all of a sudden out of the blue came this darn monkey hauling tail down the isle straight towards me.  That darn bait monkey grabbed me by the ear and drug me over to the tackle isle.  

$137 later and this is what I ended up with...

newtacklereel.jpg

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Well, I returned my new Revo SX that blew up while putting line on it to BPS. They gave me store credit with no questions asked.

The clerk from the reel dept. said he has not had a Revo returned yet, much less with a blown sidecap and spool.

I fingered the Revo STX and the Curado 100dsv for about 30 minutes comparing them. I went with the Curado since I already have the 200DHSV and know how dependable they are.

What made my mind up was the Curado is an ounce lighter than the STX and it is also made for saltwater which the STX isn't. I like to trout and redfish also.

It was only $50 more than the SX and same price as the STX. But I didn't get off that cheap. I told the clerk to ring up the difference when all of a sudden out of the blue came this darn monkey hauling tail down the isle straight towards me. That darn bait monkey grabbed me by the ear and drug me over to the tackle isle.

$137 later and this is what I ended up with...

newtacklereel.jpg

Wheres the shimano rod???

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You are going to love that 100dsv. Bought mine in early March, 2 weeks after having bought a TD Fuego. The Daiwa, while very nice, is sold. Looking to eventually pick up either an MG50 or a Calais.

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... it is also made for saltwater which the STX isn't. I like to trout and redfish also.

I've seen this before, and it's wrong.   You are a victim of a marketing ploy.

The STX is a saltwater reel (whether or not its marketed that way).  There is no difference in the bearing material between the Revo S, SX, STX and Inshore.   All use German made bearings that are solid corrosion resistant steel, not coated.  

The Revo Inshore uses exactly the same HPCR bearings as the "freshwater reels."  The Inshore's "X-Craftic alloy frame and crank-side cover for enhanced corrosion resistance" is gobblygook marketing talk to make you think you are getting something different in the Inshore than you are getting in the STX.  You aren't.  Same reels - different looks.  

If you frequent any saltwater boards, like the striped bass board, you'll see the STX is a quite a popular saltwater reel and I haven't read a single account of any problems with saltwater use.  It doesn't matter if it's a "salt-water" reel or not, any reel requires special care after saltwater use.

On top of that, the Revo's drag system is second on none - probably the best of any reel on the market today.  Certainly is provides the most drag force.  

I respect your decision, but the STX would have made a fine inshore reel.  And given it's drag system, may have been the better choice for larger saltwater fish.

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... it is also made for saltwater which the STX isn't. I like to trout and redfish also.

I've seen this before, and it's wrong. You are a victim of a marketing ploy.

The STX is a saltwater reel (whether or not its marketed that way). There is no difference in the bearing material between the Revo S, SX, STX and Inshore. All use German made bearings that are solid corrosion resistant steel, not coated.

The Revo Inshore uses exactly the same HPCR bearings as the "freshwater reels." The Inshore's "X-Craftic alloy frame and crank-side cover for enhanced corrosion resistance" is gobblygook marketing talk to make you think you are getting something different in the Inshore than you are getting in the STX. You aren't. Same reels - different looks.

If you frequent any saltwater boards, like the striped bass board, you'll see the STX is a quite a popular saltwater reel and I haven't read a single account of any problems with saltwater use. It doesn't matter if it's a "salt-water" reel or not, any reel requires special care after saltwater use.

On top of that, the Revo's drag system is second on none - probably the best of any reel on the market today. Certainly is provides the most drag force.

I respect your decision, but the STX would have made a fine inshore reel. And given it's drag system, may have been the better choice for larger saltwater fish.

Ya if im trying to make a fish MOVE in saltwater i want to use more then 12 lbs of drag force even a high speed Revo has 18

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... it is also made for saltwater which the STX isn't. I like to trout and redfish also.

...The Inshore's "X-Craftic alloy frame and crank-side cover for enhanced corrosion resistance" is gobblygook marketing talk to make you think you are getting something different in the Inshore than you are getting in the STX.  You aren't.  Same reels - different looks.  ...

Actually, you are wrong there.  Different aluminum alloys.  With proper care you might not need the extra corrosion resistance, but they are different and not everybody does take proper care.  Can't speak for the bearings, don't know.  Also, the capacities are different and the in-shore doesn't have the magnetic brakes.  Not the same reels...

But to your overall point, the STX is very well suited for inshore fishing...

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So, in other words, you went in to exchange your reel and the BaitMonkey got you in the process, $137 more ...... not bad, not enough to bite your leg off but still not bad at all.  ;D

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I don't know who is correct about the saltwater issue with these reels.  

I DO take care of all my reels, especially after saltwater use since I do a lot of that, and probably won't effected by the salt.  

I was told by 2 different employees from Bass Pro on two different trips that the reason one is salt and the other isn't is because of the spool.  

The spool on the Curado 100D is drilled(has holes in it) while the spool on the Curado 100DSV does NOT have a drilled spool.  

The drilled spool will allow saltwater to get into the inner parts of the reel making it difficult to get out without breaking it down every single time you use it.

Both model reels are the SAME price.

But if the employees were correct in their advice then why does the Premier have a drilled spool?  I think the drilled spool probably has something to do with casting rather than saltwater getting into it but I don't know.

It would be nice if we could get clarification from a "reel" expert (pun intended) and not just assumptions....

I do know this though.  I will be ordering a Premier next week.

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Wait and see what ReelMech has to say or send him a PM or e-mail.

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Well, I returned my new Revo SX that blew up while putting line on it to BPS. They gave me store credit with no questions asked.

The clerk from the reel dept. said he has not had a Revo returned yet, much less with a blown sidecap and spool.

I fingered the Revo STX and the Curado 100dsv for about 30 minutes comparing them. I went with the Curado since I already have the 200DHSV and know how dependable they are.

What made my mind up was the Curado is an ounce lighter than the STX and it is also made for saltwater which the STX isn't. I like to trout and redfish also.

It was only $50 more than the SX and same price as the STX. But I didn't get off that cheap. I told the clerk to ring up the difference when all of a sudden out of the blue came this darn monkey hauling tail down the isle straight towards me. That darn bait monkey grabbed me by the ear and drug me over to the tackle isle.

$137 later and this is what I ended up with...

newtacklereel.jpg

Dang nice stuff- I like it all especially the reel and the Lucky Craft RC!!! That reel is very nice you will not be dissapointed- I LOVE mine

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I found this on the Shimano site.  Seems the clerks at Bass Pro were clueless.

Shimano Offers Deep Spool Feature In New Curado And Citica Reels - Ideal For Coastal And Saltwater Flats, Select Bass Fishing Situations

Media contact: John Mazurkiewicz/Catalyst Marketing

IRVINE, Calif. 7/06 -- Providing anglers with the comfort and castability features of a low-profile frame, and the line capacity and power needed when fishing and saltwater coastal areas and flats, along with certain bass fishing techniques, Shimano introduces new Curado and Citica baitcasting reels with a special deep spool design.

Added to the Curado series is the CU-100DSV with a spool capacity ranging from 165 yards of 8-pound test, up to 100 yards of 14-pound test. Anglers chasing after redfish and bonefish in the shallows at times need that capacity, plus with its 6.2:1 gear ratio and deep spool, it will bring in 25-inches of line per crank, said Jeremy Sweet, reel product manager for Shimano.

The Curado 100DSV is equipped with four shielded stainless steel ball bearings and a one-way stainless roller bearing, and weighs only 7.4 ounces. As with all Curado reels, Shimano's 1/4 Turn Easy Access Sideplate allows easy access to adjust the VBS centrifugal brake weights, plus the sideplate remains attached to the reel when opened so it cannot be dropped into the water.

To the Citica series, Shimano adds the CI-100DSV and 200DSV reels, both with fast 6.2:1 gear ratios. The deep spool design provides line capacities from 180 yards of 10-pound test to 120 yards of 14-pound on the 200 size, and 165 yards of 8-pound to 100 yards of 14-pound on the 100DSV. The 200DSV will bring in 26 inches of line per crank, while the smaller Citica pulls in 25 inches per crank.

The Curado and both Citica DSV reels have the same proven features as the standard version reels. Anglers who have made these reel series some of the most popular in the Shimano line-up will see Super Free, VBS, Super Stopper with Assist Stopper, aluminum frames and Dartanium drag material, Sweet said, plus we use our larger HEG gears in the Citica 200DSV to provide more leverage and more fish moving power.

For more information on the new Curado 100DSV and Citica DSV low-profile baitcasting reels, see your local tackle dealer - visit the Shimano web site at www.shimano.com - or call Shimano's product support team at 877/577-0600 (6 am to 5 pm Pacific Standard Time).

###

Suggested retail: Curado 100DSV - $199.99; Citica 200DSV/100DSV - $119.99

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I sent a pm to ReelMech.   Let's see what he has to say...  LOOK! Up in the sky!  It's a bird! It's a plane! No wait, It's REELMECH!  

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Wait and see what ReelMech has to say
About what?

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The Revo Inshore model has a spool with holes in it.  And Abu says that the fancy aluminum in the Inshore is being used in other Revos (and there ain't no other 'saltwater' Revos).

The Revo is just fine for inshore use.  Like I said, it's highly regarded by a lot of striper fishermen.   But it doesn't matter if you get a saltwater reel or a freshwater reel, salt is corrosive and all reels should be tended to carefully after saltwater use.  

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Wait and see what ReelMech has to say
About what?

What would you recommend for fishermen that are using their equipment for both freshwater and light saltwater fishing.

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Well, I returned my new Revo SX that blew up while putting line on it to BPS. They gave me store credit with no questions asked.

The clerk from the reel dept. said he has not had a Revo returned yet, much less with a blown sidecap and spool.

I fingered the Revo STX and the Curado 100dsv for about 30 minutes comparing them. I went with the Curado since I already have the 200DHSV and know how dependable they are.

What made my mind up was the Curado is an ounce lighter than the STX and it is also made for saltwater which the STX isn't. I like to trout and redfish also.

It was only $50 more than the SX and same price as the STX. But I didn't get off that cheap. I told the clerk to ring up the difference when all of a sudden out of the blue came this darn monkey hauling tail down the isle straight towards me. That darn bait monkey grabbed me by the ear and drug me over to the tackle isle.

$137 later and this is what I ended up with...

newtacklereel.jpg

lol sounds like me.

YOur going to like those giggy heads. Caught my PB smallmouth this year on a 3/16 with a watermeleon gulp shakey worm.

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Wait and see what ReelMech has to say
About what?

What would you recommend for fishermen that are using their equipment for both freshwater and light saltwater fishing.

IMPO If you can don't use your dedicated freshwater reels in any salt at all...... ;)

Saltwater reels are lubricated, and sealed for that environment.

If using a freshwater reel in salt then immediately after returning, completely break the reel down clean and re lube.

Even if using a reel setup for salt it is always a good idea to rinse it clean, dry, and re-lube the exterior parts each trip.

;D

You wouldn't believe how many times, I have opened a freshwater reel that had been used inshore, and found salt corrosion in screw holes, "a" spring retainer holes, and in the corners of frame sides. ....

You have to completely break the reels down and soak them (every part) in a good degreaser that is warm, to lift the fungus and any moisture.

Tight Lines All!!!  

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If using a freshwater reel in salt then immediately after returning, completely break the reel down clean and re lube.

Even if using a reel setup for salt it is always a good idea to rinse it clean, dry, and re-lube the exterior parts each trip.

;D

Tight Lines All!!!

And have them fully serviced more oftenly by a professional like RM  ;), plus you get a discount for being a BR member, what more you can want ? professional service and discount.

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