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huskertko

Size matter?

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I am a little confused, I have been reading all I can on jig fishing to become a better angler with them, but during here is my confusion.  On one hand I am reading use smaller finesse jigs in the winter, but on the other hand I have read and heard use big bulky ones to make it worth while for bass to expend the energy to eat it.  Is this one of those situations where both are right and it is more personal preference, or am I missing something?

Water temps are in the low to mid 40's.

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That has been hashed out so many times over the years. I tend to throw smaller when the water is below 40 but, I have been abusing that so called rule for some years now. I like big. Big tubes,big spinnerbaits, big jigs, big worms, you name it. I still throw small when it calls for it, and the only time I think this rule might apply is in a heavily fished lake, as I said in water below 40 or clear water. I have also, witnessed it being the other way around. I think you will catch more on smaller baits and you can catch some big fish on small baits but, bigger is better to up the quality in most cases, at least for me. In the summer at a local lake I throw a big 12" worm and my buddy is a 4" or 6" ringworm kind of guy. He out fishes me 6or7-1 most of the time but, I have caught over 30 fish in that little 200 acre impoudment in the five to six pound range and he has never gotten one over  4lb4oz. Luck?, maybe. I still think it is the big worm that does it. By the way, that 12" worm is a BPS Tournament Series in either, Green Pumpkin, Watermelon Red Flake or Red Shad, it depends on the water color or if it is night or day. The RS has done really well on those hot mid July and August dust to dawn trips. I also throw the 7 1/8 Stik-O's ( Senko type bait ) wacky on a 3/0 EWG. I use a 4/0 or 5/0 EWG when rigging the worm and use  anywhere from weightless up to a 1/4oz bullet wt.

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Start small, go big, and if neither work, try a size in the middle.  One is bound to work for you.

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In clear water I use 5/16 Eakins style finesse jigs, muddy water SK pro model solid black with rattles. One thing I have noticed in the past year is weight matters more than color. Switching from a 3/8 to a 1/2oz bait tripled the number of fish I caught one day.

Allen

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I hear that Munkin. It certainly can make a difference. When I am in the flippin the the thick, Hydrilla Mat modes, I use a 1/2--1 oz jig. I want that jig rushing down by them for that reation strike. I love to watch that line JUMP!!!!!

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I use the same size jig but I go with a lighter jig. I want the same bulk but I want a slower fall. This is mainly if I am fishing shallow in deeper water I pick the weight by what I can feel at the depth.

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Fish on the Bottom

When I'm fishing during the wintertime, I usually relate to the bottom. That's where I'm trying to find the bass I'm not looking for suspended winter fish. I'm looking primarily for fish that are relating to some type of structure, whether it is a brush pile or a treetop that has been put on the bottom. For some reason, rock cover is very attractive to bass in the colder water situations. Some of my best winter fishing has been on steep rocky banks.

Remember that deep is relative to the part of the country you're fishing. Five feet may be deep on some Florida lakes while in the Midwest you could be looking at a 25- to 30- foot zone.

The weight of the jig you fish should change with depth. If I'm looking at the 5-foot zone, a heavy jig could be 3/8 ounce. If I'm looking at 25 feet, I'm probably going to be looking at a ½ to ¾ ounce bait.

Fish Slowly

I want to get that bait down to the fish. I want to maintain contact with the bottom. Try to crawl the bait along the bottom in short spurts, basically dragging it. You don't want to sweep it off the bottom like you would during the summer.

To repeat: winter jig fishing means a slow, tedious retrieve with pauses between movements of the bait. Often that's what it takes to get some of the sluggish wintertime bass to bite.

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I already posted my thoughts on the size issue in the link RW posted, but I will post it here as well.

One trick I like to use with the smaller jigs is to try to get the best of both worlds...large profile and slower fall rate. What I mean is I us an oversized trailer for my smaller jigs sometimes, giving it the bulk of a larger one, but without the weight of the larger sizes. The large profile and slow fall rate can  work well in the winter time. Good luck. ;)

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I'm trying to figure out how to fish with jigs too, and I already come to the conclusion that I like bigger better. A larger (heavier) jig is easier to pitch accurately, and makes it easier to stay in contact with the bait when you're trying to crawl it across the bottom.

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IMO

Smaller jig will always out produce in #'s

Larger jig will always out produce in quality.

That kind of goes along with fishing any type of lure

Its your choice of what you want to catch.

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IMO

Smaller jig will always out produce in #'s

Larger jig will always out produce in quality.

That kind of goes along with fishing any type of lure

Its your choice of what you want to catch.

At this point in the game, anything on a jig would be nice, size and numbers not important, heck for that matter species is not that important ;), well maybe it is but you get my point.  I guess I will just keep experimenting until I find something that I feel comfortable with.

I understand the keeping in contact with the bottom and being able to feel the jig.  I just bought my new jig rod this weekend and cant wait to give it a real test.  From the small amount of time that I did get to try it on Saturday, all I can say is WOW.  I had a 5/16 oz Eakins jis on and it felt like I was fishing a 1/2 or 3/4 oz jig, I could literally feel every twig, stone, and piece of debris on the bottom, the extra sensativity in the new rod was absolutely amazing.

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It sounds like you are just trying to catch fish and build confidence in the jig. The lure you are throwing is one I would highly suggest starting out with. Its just a little time on the water and you will pick up the trick and your on your way to jig fishing.  It also sounds like you bought a great rod and imo that is what you need in successful jig fishing.  

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It sounds like you are just trying to catch fish and build confidence in the jig. The lure you are throwing is one I would highly suggest starting out with. Its just a little time on the water and you will pick up the trick and your on your way to jig fishing.

Exactly, I have caught a couple on a jig, but most have been pitching to cover, nothing really fishing structure.  My wife ain't gonna like it but I guess I need to spend more time on the water. ;)

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It sounds like you are just trying to catch fish and build confidence in the jig. The lure you are throwing is one I would highly suggest starting out with. Its just a little time on the water and you will pick up the trick and your on your way to jig fishing.

Exactly, I have caught a couple on a jig, but most have been pitching to cover, nothing really fishing structure. My wife ain't gonna like it but I guess I need to spend more time on the water. ;)

Hey I didn't ask you on Saturday, but we need to hook up sometime next year.  I am no expert, but I think I could show you a few things fishing deeper structure with jigs out at Lone Star.  That bite really starts to pick up around mid June, but your more than welcome to come along anytime.  Around mid to late March I usually start going about every weekend or whenever the water hits around 55.  I am usually flying solo about 75% of the time so the front seat of "The Beast" (my two man boat ;)) is all yours.  Also I think I recall you catching a PB of 3 something out at Kill Creek earlier this year??? ....  well I am 100% positive that with in a few trips you could improve on that.

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It sounds like you are just trying to catch fish and build confidence in the jig. The lure you are throwing is one I would highly suggest starting out with. Its just a little time on the water and you will pick up the trick and your on your way to jig fishing.

Exactly, I have caught a couple on a jig, but most have been pitching to cover, nothing really fishing structure. My wife ain't gonna like it but I guess I need to spend more time on the water. ;)

Hey I didn't ask you on Saturday, but we need to hook up sometime next year. I am no expert, but I think I could show you a few things fishing deeper structure with jigs out at Lone Star. That bite really starts to pick up around mid June, but your more than welcome to come along anytime. Around mid to late March I usually start going about every weekend or whenever the water hits around 55. I am usually flying solo about 75% of the time so the front seat of "The Beast" (my two man boat ;)) is all yours. Also I think I recall you catching a PB of 3 something out at Kill Creek earlier this year??? .... well I am 100% positive that with in a few trips you could improve on that.

Sound good to me, I would definitely appreciate any tips or advice.  

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Sound good to me, I would definitely appreciate any tips or advice.

Pssshhhh .... Me too!!!! ;) ;)

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Sound good to me, I would definitely appreciate any tips or advice.

Pssshhhh .... Me too!!!! ;) ;)

Did you get a chance to take that new St Croix out this weekend?  I did some "casting" on Saturday on the way home and the amount of sensitivity in that Loomis is just unbelievable compared to the Quantum that I had been fishing jigs on.

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Yeah, I went out to Kill Creek and tossed around 1/4 oz spot remover.  My first impression was how well it casted.  I think I accomplished what I wanted in replacing my spinning set up.  Then the sensitivity ....... AWESOME.  This is my first higher end rod and I see more in my future. :-?  I've already got the ball rolling and decided I MUST improve my jig/worm rod.  Back in the same boat though ...... Legend Tourney or IMX??? ;)  I would really like to eventually stick with one brand rod for consistency, but the Jig/Worm rod that St. Croix recommends is 6'6" and a prefer 7' especially for fishing deeper open water structure.  Their 7' MH is advertised as an open water spinnerbait rod.  I am thinking it will be a little lacking in the back bone for jigs.  Decisions, decisions!!!

I'll get in touch with you this spring and let you know when I start going out.

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