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The Rooster

Lure weight on a rod

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A rod says 3/8 - 1 oz. lure weight.  If I cast a lure weighing 1/4 oz. but it's a lure like a jig or spinnerbait, isn't that 1/4 oz. rating only allowing for the leadhead itself, and by time I add weight for the skirt, hook, blades or wire arm, it's well over 1/4 oz.......right??  

I'm guessing a rod won't load right and cast very far if the lure weighs less than it's intended useage was for, but if this is right then I won't have any real trouble throwing 1/4 oz. spinnerbaits and jigs with a rod with the 3/8 - 1 oz. range.

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You will still have trouble. Light lures don't load up well on heavy rods.

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Rooster,

The specs written on the rod is what you need to follow to have strong casts without backlashes.

Line test and lure weights are crucial to have the rod perform as it is designed.

I always check out the rod's specs when rigging up for my fishing outings and use the line test and lure weights as recommended.

The rod length is also critical to your bait, technique and casting distance as is its power rating.

And you thought fishing was simple!  ;)

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In answer to your first question, a 1/4 oz spinnerbait should be 1/4 oz as packaged. The lead should be less than 1/4 oz so that the complete bait is as rated.  However, as you add trailers to spinnerbaits and chunks to jig, you gain some weight.

My opinion differs slightly from RW and Sam on rod ratings. Two important things not yet mentioned.

1. Rod specs are someone's opinion, not a mathematical formula or physical measurement of the rod's power and action.

2. Rod specs do NOT account for casting style or tip speed.

For example, I always cast the low end of the range better and have no trouble going a little lower than recommended. But normally in the top half of the range is problematic for me. Why? Casting style. I learned BC using light weight baits on heavy rods. Rod tip speed accounts for much of my casting, not a baits weight making the rod load up. I have to consciously slow down my casting as I use heavier baits in a rod's "range."

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I agree with flechero on this one, as I tend to use lures that are at the low end of the rods rating, or even below it.  I often cast sidearm or with roll casts while sitting in my kayak and I find that I can cast lighter lures without much issue on a heavier rod with a soft tip.  These numbers are recommendations from the manufacturer and will suit most fishermen very well, but that doesn't mean you can't operate the equipment outside these recommendations without great success, especially with a little practice.

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I ignore the lure weight listed on a rod as I do the line test listed on the rod. When I buy a rod I bring the reel I want to use on the rod, I put the reel on the rod string it up and tie on the bait I want to use on the setup, now I know exactly how the setup will feel on the lake.

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Well, for those without a decade or more under your belt, I would

still recommend paying attention to the manufacture's guidelines.

8-)

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I generally don't pay attention to the ratings on the rod, and go by feel.  What's funny, what I like usually pretty close to printed guidelines anyway.

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Well, for those without a decade or more under your belt, I would

still recommend paying attention to the manufacture's guidelines.

8-)

I do agree that the ratings are a good thing, most of the time, but the reason I went into detail was that the OP was getting close to splitting hairs on the weight, and seemed concerned about it.

As was stated, for most people (probably 80%-90%) the ratings are just fine. I just didn't want anyone to pigeon hole themselves based on a "guideline."

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The Rooster

The rod you speak about is probably a medium heavy power with a fast tip action. I throw all my spinnerbaits from 3/16 on up on this power rating (from 6' to 7' rods), so you shouldn't have any problem with a 1/4 oz spinnerbait...You just have to get the reel setup properly.

Also as RW mentioned always try to keep within and pay attention to the ratings...

Good Luck & Tight Lines!!!!

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You are exactly right, it's a medium heavy with fast tip Shimano Compre in a 6'6" length.  I plan to do the bulk of my fishing with these rods and this rating.  I guess I'll know more about them when I get the rod in my hand and get to fish with it, cause I don't have one yet, but I will have soon.  They make them in a medium power too, in the 1/4 to 3/4 range but if I can make 1/4 oz. baits work on that medium heavy then I won't have to buy another rod just for that weight lure.  

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