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Making a normal rod a split grip

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I have seen people do this before. How would I do it? I want to do it on a 6'6" MH Cherrywood. Thanks in advance.

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You don't need a split grip . If you are convinced that you need a split grip take the cherrywood back and get the Berkley AMP. A split grip has nothing to do with casting, they just look cool. Split grips look cool, but I can still cast just as far or better with a solid cork rod.

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The benefits of having a split grip vs solid grips is for sensitivity and it saves weight. I did it to my clarus and I haven't had any negative experiences with it. I just sanded it down to the blank, becareful not to sand the blank  and just expoxy it. You can also take the front grip off too. Never tried it though.

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You don't need a split grip . If you are convinced that you need a split grip take the cherrywood back and get the Berkley AMP. A split grip has nothing to do with casting, they just look cool. Split grips look cool, but I can still cast just as far or better with a solid cork rod.

IMO split grips are more comfy casting and palming my reels im gonna do a few of my rapala rods this way today seeeeing its stormin again with hail YAY

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The benefits of having a split grip vs solid grips is for sensitivity and it saves weight. I did it to my clarus and I haven't had any negative experiences with it. I just sanded it down to the blank, becareful not to sand the blank and just expoxy it. You can also take the front grip off too. Never tried it though.

Sensitivity?  Who holds their rods that far back on the handle and as for weight,  just how much extra would the cork weigh on a split grip if it was all cork?  

It's basically an "In" thing right now.  I've used one and see zero advantages.  

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I've seen this discussion before and it still amazes me. If you believe a split grip has any advantage on a fishing rod....well, my friend, "I've got a hell of a bridge for sale"!  ;)

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I wont deny that my mojo with the awesome reel and reel grips looks sexy, it doesn't fish any better than a full cork handle. Sensitivity is in the tip genius.

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I believe it helps out some with sensitivity, b/c the blank of the rod is laying on my arm.... just my 2 cents.  Thanks for  bringing this up though b/c I lost my saved page with the tutorial.

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I've done it twice and it is a lot of fun. I wrote a short piece on how I did it.

Any weight loss is almost negligible and any increase in sensitivity is dependent on the design of the split grip. If your palm is 100% still on the cork or other material, I do not see how that is going to help increase rod sensitivity other than insignificantly lightening the rod. If one wants a split grip for those benefits they've bought into marketing hype. If they want a split grip because it looks cool and is aesthetically pleasing to the eye, then proceed by all means. ;D

Rapala Spinning Rod

CopyofSTA74182Large.jpg

When held, the palm is still 100% on the cork.

Berkley Lightning Casting Rod

STA74211Large.jpg

The split is made such that my palm in on the cork and blank.

STA74206Large.jpg

PM if you want a copy of the amateur piece I wrote.

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A split grip - from the factory (not done yourself) - saves cost. Cork is expensive and it's one of the big reasons a lot of factory rods quickly adopted the concept. $ driven.

From a performance standpoint - anything you do to reduce added weight to the rod blank increases sensitivity. With a split grip you are not ony losing cork but epoxy as well. The epoxy is probably the biggest weight savings area.

Think about this... you may feel .25 oz is nothing... shaving .25 oz on a 4 oz rod is a 6.25% weight reduction - but that's the same as a 200# guy losing 12.5#.

Here's a thought... if you don't grip in the middle of the handle... why do you need anything there? You don't. I know some guys that do and split grips are not for them. Split grips are not good for rod holders either.

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You don't need a split grip . If you are convinced that you need a split grip take the cherrywood back and get the Berkley AMP. A split grip has nothing to do with casting, they just look cool. Split grips look cool, but I can still cast just as far or better with a solid cork rod.

I bought one of these AMP rods to see if I liked the handle/reel seat not at all for the split grip. I found I like the direct contact with the blank, which leads to my question(s).

For years there have been casting blanks with the blank exposed in the reel seat, why does this seem to be such a breakthrough in spinning rods and are the seats available to builders?

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I don't really understand why you would do this. Just to try it? It really will not make you catch any more fish. Is it for looks?

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A split-grip rod allows a two-handed caster to position his second hand more consistently at the same location on the handle which will help the consistency and accuracy of his casting.  No other technical advantages have been proven to me.  I have sanded existing grips to a hour-glass shape without exposing the blank and find these rods to be my most comfortable and consistently accurate rods... just another take on the same idea.

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Steve - I like that idea. Then you don't have to worry about what to do in the middle once the cork is gone!

Reo - you can always make your own by cutting a hole in the top of the reel seat and then offsetting the blank in the seat. Basically the rod wouldn't be in the middle of the seat but along the top so the blank filled up the hole you made.

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my neighbor has done this to a few of his rods and rather the clearcoat or epoxy for the exposed blank he just gets some black cork tape (thin,i beleive its used for bike handlebars) and puts it on the open blank,to me i dont see why he goes to all that work to then put a thin layer or tape on the blank but eh i dont say anything lol.looks cool though.for me id rather just go buy a new rod with a split grip.makes the baitmonkey happy too. ;)

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This looks WAY too home made IMO! The lack of the rings at each end of the cork grips makes it look bad! I would just sale them and buy split grip rods!

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reo,

I bought one of these AMP rods to see if I liked the handle/reel seat not at all for the split grip. I found I like the direct contact with the blank, which leads to my question(s).

For years there have been casting blanks with the blank exposed in the reel seat, why does this seem to be such a breakthrough in spinning rods and are the seats available to builders?

Because the AMP rods don't use a ECSM (BLANK EXPOSED REEL SEATS), they are using what is called a skeleton seat (just the heal and toe of a seat are mounted).

Neither the ECSM or the skeleton seats are break through they both have been around for some time now. The first skeleton seat was made by Fuji® back in the early 80-90's and didn't sell well and they discontinued it. There were a few builders (including myself) testing the skeleton theory, and we found on lighter more brittle thin walled blanks we were having failure issues with a skeleton seat. They were failing right in the middle were the anglers hands would make contact with the blank. Causing sometimes damage to the hands.

I know I dumped the idea real quick and opted to use just the ECSM's from Fuji® instead...

Just an old builders .02¢

Tight Lines!!!

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As far as re-moding a rod from full grips to split grips and having a more sensitive rod most likely not, especially if you leave the dampening foregrip on the rod in front of the seat.

You also make the rod balance differently than it did with the weight of the full grip. Take cork away and you lighten up the area that needed the weight to balance the rod nearest to the seat, take cork away from the rear and you cause the rod to be MORE tip heavy.

Rod builders use the split grip NOT just because it's cool, but to help lighten up and balance a rod. We don't use fore grips because of the dampening effect it has on a rods sensitivity...I have built rods were there isn't any cork on the rod, just seat and guides.

Just an old builders .02¢

Tight Lines All!!

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Hey reel mech, do you have any pics of rods with no cork? That sounds pretty cool actually!

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A split-grip rod allows a two-handed caster to position his second hand more consistently at the same location on the handle which will help the consistency and accuracy of his casting. No other technical advantages have been proven to me. I have sanded existing grips to a hour-glass shape without exposing the blank and find these rods to be my most comfortable and consistently accurate rods... just another take on the same idea.

That is one of the things I like most about split grip rods. I also find split grips to be more comfortable than full grip rods, and split grip rods are lighter than full grip rods, there's no arguing that point. Anytime you remove materiel from something it is going to be lighter.

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As I said before, a split grip rod is a pimp/show off thing. My high end reels are paired with high end rods. My steez is mounted on a steez rod, one of my zillions is on a TD light and tough rod, and my new curado is on a new cumara rod. My point is if you buy the high end gear a split grip is a non topic. For the part time, or half time fisherman who mainly use spinning gear you dont need a split grip unless you're out for looks.

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