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Magnesium used in reel frames

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I remember from high school science class that magnesium was the metal that bursted into a blazing inferno when combined with water. So how do they use magnesium to make fishing reel frames?? Is it not the same thing?? Apparently not, but what is it then??

Of course there's always the chance that when they told what kind of metal it really was they were putting water on to do that experiment way back in school.....I was asleep! :P

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Magnesium alloy.

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In order for mg to catch on fire an ignition source is needed such as a torch.  Once the mg is on fire water can cause an explosion.  Your mg reel should be fine :P

I spent over 30 years in the scrap metal industry and I knew of cases when cast iron for example caught on fire and exploded when mixed with water.

Examining the shape and color of metal sparks of some ferrous and non ferrous metals is one  of way of determining exactly what alloy you have.  BTW other than steel and iron there are several other metals that are magnetic.

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Magnesium is a highly flammable metal, it is easy to ignite when powdered or shaved into thin strips, and it is difficult to ignite in mass or bulk. The autoignition temperature of magnesium is approximately 744 K (473 °C, 883 °F) in air. Burning magnesium is usually quenched by using a Class D dry chemical fire extinguisher, or by covering the fire with sand or magnesium foundry flux to remove its air source.

Magnesium is highly corrosive with limited moisture (corrosion of magnesium alloys increases with relative humidity) and once corrosion started it is impossible since the corrosion will be intergranular corrosion (IGC), also termed intergranular attack (IGA).

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I think you're thinking of Sodium. It is a metal that will react violently with water. Magnesium will oxidize real bad but not explode like Sodium.

Scott.

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I think you're thinking of Sodium. It is a metal that will react violently with water. Magnesium will oxidize real bad but not explode like Sodium.

Scott.

Sodium will react violently when exposed to air, that's why it's stored in oil . Take it out of the oil and expose it to air, it will start to oxidize and burn.

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I remember from high school science class that magnesium was the metal that bursted into a blazing inferno when combined with water. So how do they use magnesium to make fishing reel frames?? Is it not the same thing?? Apparently not, but what is it then??

Of course there's always the chance that when they told what kind of metal it really was they were putting water on to do that experiment way back in school.....I was asleep! :P

Dude your still asleep !!!!!!!!!!

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Magnesium reels and saltwater do not mix, the corrosion once started can not  be stopped.  Was reading a reel's info the other day, a daiwa magnesium reel I believe, and the manufacturer definitely wrote to avoid saltwater.  Beside I think before I went mg I would go with graphite, seems to me that mg would be more likely to flex than quality graphite would be, mg is a very soft metal.

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Sodium will react violently when exposed to air, that's why it's stored in oil . Take it out of the oil and expose it to air, it will start to oxidize and burn.

Sodium's reaction in air is due mostly to the humidity

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Sodium will react violently when exposed to air, that's why it's stored in oil . Take it out of the oil and expose it to air, it will start to oxidize and burn.

Sodium's reaction in air is due mostly to the humidity

The last time I worked with Sodium, Gerald Ford was President.

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Magnesium reels and saltwater do not mix, the corrosion once started can not be stopped. Was reading a reel's info the other day, a daiwa magnesium reel I believe, and the manufacturer definitely wrote to avoid saltwater. Beside I think before I went mg I would go with graphite, seems to me that mg would be more likely to flex than quality graphite would be, mg is a very soft metal.

Quite true, but all that being said I've  been using a supreme 35 in saltwater nearly a year with no ill affects.  I catch fish that go 10+ and fight very hard, reel handles them beautifully.  I would probably not use a mg reel in salt again only as a precaution.

I rinse immediately after each use where possible, then rinse again once I get home.

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Magnesium and any moisture fresh or salt does not mix :P

Corrosion of magnesium alloys increases with relative humidity. At 9.5% relative humidity, neither pure magnesium nor any of its alloys exhibit evidence of surface corrosion after 18 months. At 30% relative humidity, only minor corrosion may occur. At 80% relative humidity the surface may exhibit considerable corrosion. The corrosion of magnesium alloys by pure water increases substantially with ambient temperature.

Properly anodized magnesium improves the corrosion resistance, wear resistance and hardness of the base magnesium metal.

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Shimano Stella fd is a mg reel and approved for saltwater use as stated on their web site

http://fish.shimano.com/publish/content/global_fish/en/us/index/products/reels/spinning/Stella_FD.html

Magnesium in tablet form helps relax your nerves and muscles and aids in blood circulation

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Shimano Stella fd is a mg reel and approved for saltwater use as stated on their web site

http://fish.shimano.com/publish/content/global_fish/en/us/index/products/reels/spinning/Stella_FD.html

So are the Chronarch 50/51 Mg

Core 100

However I 'd rather not roll the dice exposing a magnesium reel to salt/brackish water, the protection the coating provides is only as good as thick the coating is, a deep enough scratch and the coating is gone leaving the magnesium free to corrode away.

Don 't know about you guys but I don 't have 350+ dollars to sweep from the floor to get me another reel when my corroded reel falls appart to pieces.

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Yeah, I think the violent reaction you saw in chemistry was likely sodium.  The typical demonstration with magnesium is taking magnesium permanganate & adding glycerin.  It will start to smoke & eventually catch fire.  It creates a thermite reaction that burn very brightly (and very hot).

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