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Left handed bait casters

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I have a right hander and don't have any problem changing hands after a cast. But looking at left handed reels, it would appear that casting would be smoother if switching the rod between hands didn't need to be done.

What are your thoughts????

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George Welcome:

Let's get technical, as there are in fact reasons, not just some lame holdover from days past that put the handles where they are.

What will move the fish during retrieval is placed to the strong hand!

A baitcast is designed to be used as a winch, so it is the reel that retrieves the fish. Hence if you are right handed the handle is in your right hand.

A spinning reel is designed to pick up unloaded or loose line, not retrieve the fish. Hence it is the rod that does the retrieval, so it is the rod that is in your strong hand. If you are right handed then the pole goes to the right hand.

______________________

This comes up every month and everyone seems

to enjoy the topic. Here's a thread from 2007:

http://www.bassresource.com/bass_fishing_forums/YaBB.pl?num=1187794805

We'll let this one run 4 pages, too!

-Kent a.k.a. roadwarrior

Global Moderator

8-)

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I would rather have the rod in my strong hand for hook-setting purposes.

I am right handed. I can fish with both, but prefer left-handed reels.

I dont care too much for the science or explanations behind it.  I know what feels comfortable for me.

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I prefer LH reels, but have adapted to use both quite well.  I have learned that if the hand switch is made while the lure is in flight, there is no loss, but it does make for more moves in the casting mechanics which might irk some folks.

I see some plausibility to RW's post, but casting or spinning, it is just more comfortable for me the LH reels.  I'll still winch the in with casting and play them in with spinning. Maybe being a keyboard player makes my hands equally dextrous.  :-[

This topic comes around quite frequently so take advantage of the search function to find the posts that have nuggets of great information.

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The bottom line is to experiment with the handle on

the "wrong" side and see how you like it!

Just kidding...Use what you like, it's not going to make

a lot of difference. I fish baitcasters with a right hand

retrieve, spinning tackle with a left hand retrieve. They

both seem "natural" to me.

8-)

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I would rather have the rod in my strong hand for hook-setting purposes.

I am right handed. I can fish with both, but prefer left-handed reels.

I dont care too much for the science or explanations behind it. I know what feels comfortable for me.

+1

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 What RW said George said (hunh?) makes more sense than anything I've heard. Personally, I cast right-handed and crank the handle right-handed :-[. Who said "sense" had something to do with the way folks do anything :D...

skillet

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The bottom line is to experiment with the handle on

the "wrong" side and see how you like it!

Just kidding...Use what you like, it's not going to make

a lot of difference. I fish baitcasters with a right hand

retrieve, spinning tackle with a left hand retrieve. They

both seem "natural" to me.

8-)

I am the exact same way. My wife has a LH bait caster and it feels like a strange luxury.

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Andy Varipapa was billed as "the greatest one-man bowling show on earth", but in spite of his fame,

Andy used a 3-step approach and a two-fingered ball. Despite Andy's tremendous success,

most pro bowlers, then and now, use a 4-step approach and a 3-fingered ball.

All that said, I have a sneaky suspicion that Andy Varipapa designed the first baitcasting reel ;D

I'm a right-handed person, so I insist on a "left-hand" conventional reel, and I like three-holes in my bowling ball too.

If a reel that I'm interested in buying is not available in a left-hand version, they lost a customer.

Small fish can easily be winched to the boat using a revolving drum or for that matter, any spinning reel.

Try that with a powerful game fish on the end of the line and the reel will often be humiliated.

We've all heard expressions like, I couldn't budge her, until I got her head turned around (that is 'real-world').

When a large fish is still facing away from the boat, her entire body and all her fins are working against the angler.

It feels little different from being snagged to a fat stump, and the reel, even a 5:1 revolving drum would offer little value.

You're only hope is steady, heavy pressure on the rod, to pry the head of the brute slowly around.

Once a large fish is facing the boat, its body and fins are no longer in opposition to the angler, and now she can be pumped

to the boat using the rod, while the slack line created is taken up with the reel during each downstroke of the rod.

A likely response would be, "yeah, but I don't fish for mako shark". True enough, but what's best for large fish,

can't be wrong for small fish. Furthermore, even with the fish out of the equation, getting hung-up on a bulrush stalk

is more of the same. Are you going to reel the lure out of the stalk? I don't think so.

You're more likely to pull the whole boat over to the snag using rod pressure. The power arm is a terrible thing to waste.

Roger

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Andy Varipapa was billed as "the greatest one-man bowling show on earth", but in spite of his fame,

Andy used a 3-step approach and a two-fingered ball. Despite Andy's tremendous success,

most pro bowlers, then and now, use a 4-step approach and a 3-fingered ball.

All that said, I have a sneaky suspicion that Andy Varipapa designed the first baitcasting reel ;D

I'm a right-handed person, so I insist on a "left-hand" conventional reel, and I like three-holes in my bowling ball too.

If a reel that I'm interested in buying is not available in a left-hand version, they lost a customer.

Small fish can easily be winched to the boat using a revolving drum or for that matter, any spinning reel.

Try that with a powerful game fish on the end of the line and the reel will often be humiliated.

We've all heard expressions like, I couldn't budge her, until I got her head turned around (that is 'real-world').

When a large fish is still facing away from the boat, her entire body and all her fins are working against the angler.

It feels little different from being snagged to a fat stump, and the reel, even a 5:1 revolving drum would offer little value.

You're only hope is steady, heavy pressure on the rod, to pry the head of the brute slowly around.

Once a large fish is facing the boat, its body and fins are no longer in opposition to the angler, and now she can be pumped

to the boat using the rod, while the slack line created is taken up with the reel during each downstroke of the rod.

A likely response would be, "yeah, but I don't fish for mako shark". True enough, but what's best for large fish,

can't be wrong for small fish. Furthermore, even with the fish out of the equation, getting hung-up on a bulrush stalk

is more of the same. Are you going to reel the lure out of the stalk? I don't think so.

You're more likely to pull the whole boat over to the snag using rod pressure. The power arm is a terrible thing to waste.

Roger

POWER ARM FOR THE WIN!!!!!!!

Gimme my lefties.   ;D

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Another great post by RoLo.. My rebuttal: I'm a BEAST in both arms, as Micro put once "I'm a master of my domain"

my mistake...I should've mentioned that the field is wide-open for the ambidextrous iron-pumper ;D

Roger

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I use both LH & RH baitcasting reels, I prefer using a LH reel for Worm/ Jig fishing because I like setting the hook with my strong (right) hand and also when I'm pitching lures there is no switching hands. I use RH reels for my Crank/ Spinnerbait rods. I know it will probably seem odd to some but I've been fishing that way for years and I'm totally comfotable doing it that way.

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I would rather have the rod in my strong hand for hook-setting purposes.

I am right handed. I can fish with both, but prefer left-handed reels.

I dont care too much for the science or explanations behind it. I know what feels comfortable for me.

Same here!

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Grew up casting right and retrieving left using spinning tackle. When I made the switch to baitcasters the only available locally was RH baitcasters, so that is what I used. I have always been aggrevated that I had to switch hands after the cast. I recently purchased a LH reel here to experiment, what I found is that due to the design of a baitcaster I need the handle in my right hand, and the rod in my left. The first fish I caught the rod spun in my hand and the reel ended up below the rod!! Don't ask me how I have no idea, I think it was because I was holding the handle and not palming the reel. Also I palm the reel when retrieving so I have to adjust my hands after the cast anyway, for me it is much easier to move the rod to my left and postition my right on the handle. Otherwise I find myself grabbing the rod in my left, moving my right up to palm the reel, and then my lft hand goes to the handle, actually wastes more movement and time. Growing up using spinning tackle I am so used to having the weight of the reel in my retrieving hand that I can not hold a trigger rod by the handle alone, the reel has to be in my hand. I tried casting while palming the reel, that doesn't work to well. For me it is much simpler to just cast right, palm left, and reel right.

As far as why RH reels having the handle on the RH I think it goes back to the original design of the reels. BC used to have no free spool or antireverse, so when you set the hook you had to hold the handle still, and then back reel when the fish ran etc. Was easier with the strong hand.

To me as well a spinning reel hangs under the rod, the center of gravity places the reel in its proper place, you have to hold a bc set up with the reel up, so whether you realize it or not you are balancing the rod with the hand that is on the handle. I guess it is fine motor skills, that my left hand doesn't possess without conscious thought.

Those who think you miss bites because you are switching hands, are just wrong.  I fish buzzbaits all the time, I get them on plane so fast I don't even think they get completely submerged.   So for me the answer is to cast right reel right with BC and cast right reel left with spinning gear.  

Anyway I now have a LH baitcaster for sale cheap, look in the flea market.

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i don't belive in that ''strong hand'' to reel with stuff !! it is what ever hand you feel the best to work the rod with , you reel with the other hand . i'm right handed and work the rod with that same hand , so i wind with my left . i am just happy that reel manufactures are wisening up and making the equal amounts of baitcasters in both left/right retrieve . now maybe one day i might try a pflueger ! and thank you Shimano for making the CORE in a left hand retrieve !! :D

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i don't belive in that ''strong hand'' to reel with stuff !! it is what ever hand you feel the best to work the rod with , you reel with the other hand . i'm right handed and work the rod with that same hand , so i wind with my left . i am just happy that reel manufactures are wisening up and making the equal amounts of baitcasters in both left/right retrieve . now maybe one day i might try a pflueger ! and thank you Shimano for making the CORE in a left hand retrieve !! :D

2X

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Just thankful that I have two hands to work with...

Decisions decisions ... do I buy righty or lefty

my oh my what to do, what to do.

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i don't belive in that ''strong hand'' to reel with stuff !! it is what ever hand you feel the best to work the rod with , you reel with the other hand . i'm right handed and work the rod with that same hand , so i wind with my left . i am just happy that reel manufactures are wisening up and making the equal amounts of baitcasters in both left/right retrieve . now maybe one day i might try a pflueger ! and thank you Shimano for making the CORE in a left hand retrieve !! :D

2X

I agree. But only in freshwater situations. In saltwater, depending on the fish and size, I'd go w/ right hand retrieve for conventional reels.

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I agree. But only in freshwater situations. In saltwater, depending on the fish and size, I'd go w/ right hand retrieve for conventional reels.

I disagree, in saltwater at times I use a conventional reel, the fish that I target are larger and stronger than freshwater species. I prefer left hand crank while my strong arm, the right, is handling the rod which is handling the fish, as Rolo said the reel is just taking up the slack and much less strength is required to turn the handle.  I do recommend a fighting belt or at least know how to position the rod butt in your crouch and not under your armpit for maximum leverage, regardless of which hand you are cranking with ( same for spinning).

This winching business that has been mentioned before, imo is pure nonsense. Every year we are seeing more and more conventional reels available with left hand crank, must be something to it. What ever is comfortable to you is the right way to go.

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Don't let any of these right handed, right reelers fool you.  If you are right handed, you reel with your left and hold the pole with your right.  The only reason they reel with the right hand, is that is the way they learned.  Why most of them don't change is a good question but, I would guess the answer to lie in their lack of ambition or the amount of money they have invested in right handed reels and don't want to go to the expense to change.  I always get a kick out of how they rationalize why they use a right handed reels.  Honestly, do any of their reasons have merit?  Would you wear a baseball glove on your right hand to catch the ball only to take it off to throw.  If you had one arm, I suppose you would.

At this stage do yourself a favor and learn the correct way.  Your power hand on the rod and your weak hand on the reel.  You will not regret it.

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