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justfishin

Snakehead Fish problem in Maryland.

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One of the ponds probably overflowed and dumped them....pity.

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Snakeheads have been misreported by the media and misunderstood by just about everyone.

They have been down here in Florida for years and nobody seemed to notice. They aren't the

killing machines that the media has made them out to be. I have fished for them here, Thailand

and Malaysia. They are one of my favorite sport fish. There are also a lot of different species.

One of which was introduced in Hawaii on purpose. They are a much better game fish then bass

and are very good to eat. The species that you have up there, Channa Argus, know as the

Northern Snakehead are somewhat shy and not as aggressive. The Bulls-eye Snakehead we

have down here falls into the same category, where as the Giant Snakehead, known here as the

Red Snakehead is much more aggressive and would be the most potentially destructive species.

I think instead of just killing them you might want to take them home and enjoy a good tasting

fish dinner. Don't fear just enjoy another strong fight fish.

Scott

P.S. There were Snakehead farms here in the US before the wide spread panic, just no one

cared until it was the popular thing to do.

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The issue is not whether or not they are good to catch or what they have done in Florida, it is what they could potentially do to the ecosystems in Maryland and Virginia. There is no way to know what they might do, just like any case when new, foreign species are introduced into new ecosystems. It is therefore dangerous to allow them to establish a population in local waters, no matter how "fun" they are to catch...

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Brown trout are not native to the US...and they are actually quite aggressive.

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Snakeheads have been misreported by the media and misunderstood by just about everyone.

They have been down here in Florida for years and nobody seemed to notice. They aren't the

killing machines that the media has made them out to be. I have fished for them here, Thailand

and Malaysia. They are one of my favorite sport fish. There are also a lot of different species.

One of which was introduced in Hawaii on purpose. They are a much better game fish then bass

and are very good to eat. The species that you have up there, Channa Argus, know as the

Northern Snakehead are somewhat shy and not as aggressive. The Bulls-eye Snakehead we

have down here falls into the same category, where as the Giant Snakehead, known here as the

Red Snakehead is much more aggressive and would be the most potentially destructive species.

I think instead of just killing them you might want to take them home and enjoy a good tasting

fish dinner. Don't fear just enjoy another strong fight fish.

Scott

P.S. There were Snakehead farms here in the US before the wide spread panic, just no one

cared until it was the popular thing to do.

I think I am inclined to respectfully disagree with you here. Here is a link discussing the features of each snakehead species and the possible ecological impact they could have.

http://www.csa.com/discoveryguides/snakehead/overview.php

I am not aware of how the aquatic food chain works in Maryland, so I am not aware of what the greatest aquatic predator in Maryland may be. I do know in Florida snakeheads would not be at the top of the aquatic foodchain. That belongs to the gators down there which can help control a snakehead population down there. There are also a huge variety of birds that feed heavily on fish in florida that could aslo help control a snakehead population.

In Maryland their are no such predators that can effectively prey upon snakehead which will lead to the displacement of native fish species as well as increased competition for prey for native fish species. Snakeheads reproduce quickly laying as many as 100,000 eggs at a time. I am sure snakehead fry could fall prey to native predatory fish such as bass and the pike family of fish. The fact is that the ecosystem as it is today is self sustaining with the correct balance of predatory and prey fish. Add another large predatory fish with few natural enemies, can reproduce quickly, and puts a extra strain upon the prey base that spells disaster for a sustained ecosystem.

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quote author[=Bionic link=1165842041/0#2 date=1165881837].

I think I am inclined to respectfully disagree with you here. Here is a link discussing the features of each snakehead species and the possible ecological impact they could have.

http://www.csa.com/discoveryguides/snakehead/overview.php

I am not aware of how the aquatic food chain works in Maryland, so I am not aware of what the greatest aquatic predator in Maryland may be. I do know in Florida snakeheads would not be at the top of the aquatic foodchain. That belongs to the gators down there which can help control a snakehead population down there. There are also a huge variety of birds that feed heavily on fish in florida that could aslo help control a snakehead population.

In Maryland their are no such predators that can effectively prey upon snakehead which will lead to the displacement of native fish species as well as increased competition for prey for native fish species. Snakeheads reproduce quickly laying as many as 100,000 eggs at a time. I am sure snakehead fry could fall prey to native predatory fish such as bass and the pike family of fish. The fact is that the ecosystem as it is today is self sustaining with the correct balance of predatory and prey fish. Add another large predatory fish with few natural enemies, can reproduce quickly, and puts a extra strain upon the prey base that spells disaster for a sustained ecosystem.

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They aren't killing the snakeheads for no reasons, they are killing them in an attempt to keep them from spreading into other ecosystems and potentially killing thousands and thousands of other species. Whether or not that will happen we don't know, but I would rather not take the chance. I know a lot of the efforts taken in the Maryland/Virginia areas where they have been found has helped the problem from spreading.

Also, as for the peacock bass comparison. It is my understanding that peacock bass need a very specific climate for survival and therefore can only survive in certain parts of Florida. It is different with the snakehead because they are not that climate sensitive and can therefore spread into and threaten more ecosystems.

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They aren't killing the snakeheads for no reasons, they are killing them in an attempt to keep them from spreading into other ecosystems and potentially killing thousands and thousands of other species. Whether or not that will happen we don't know, but I would rather not take the chance. I know a lot of the efforts taken in the Maryland/Virginia areas where they have been found has helped the problem from spreading.

Also, as for the peacock bass comparison. It is my understanding that peacock bass need a very specific climate for survival and therefore can only survive in certain parts of Florida. It is different with the snakehead because they are not that climate sensitive and can therefore spread into and threaten more ecosystems.

Your are correct. The Snakeheads here are also restricted to the south as they can not survive cold

water, where as the ones you have can. I would just prefer to see them on a diner plate then a

garbage can. Maybe donate them to food kitchens. Like I see make something positive out of it.

Scott

P.S. Evolution and change are inevitable I am on the side of, if life hands you lemons you just

make lemonade :)

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I used to have a red snakehead in a 50 gallon tank.  He got pretty big then died.  My buddy had a northern snakehead and the thing used to jump out of his tank.  They claim they can walk all over land, but my buddies was not out of the tank more then 2 hours and it was seriously messed up.  It died the next morning.   :-[  I know they can breath air, but they will dry out like any other fish.

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I would much rather catch a bass than a snakehead. I don't see a future business in guide fishing for snakeheads. Who would want to catch one? They are ugly and pesky, just like the stupid bowfin that always eat my bass lures.

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Who is to say if snakeheads will damage/wipe out other fish populations or not. I for one would not bet on it either way...........BUT that beeing said, many MANY waters home to Largemouth bass are not in it's native range either........how many people think thats a bad thing??

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I really dont think that snakehead will ever harm the bass population. Largemouth bass are the top predator freshwater fish in the States. I never seen another fish eat a bass. Catfish dont even eat largemouth bass, and they eat all kinds of stuff. Northern pike/muskie are very similar to Snakehead. Snakehead as much a threat to bass and as pike/muskie.

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its interesting this whole native vs non native debate goes to show that the funding available to those that convince us the sky is falling

as a note no fish are native in a man made lake

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I would much rather catch a bass than a snakehead. I don't see a future business in guide fishing for snakeheads. Who would want to catch one? They are ugly and pesky, just like the stupid bowfin that always eat my bass lures.

I would be willing to bet you are all excited when the bowfin hits and is pulling hard and only get

upset when you see it's a bowfin. It amazes me.

To me I enjoy any fish that I catch, there is no garbage fish. I also think it's funny when

I see people whoot and holler when they hook a fish thinking man I got a big one for it to turn out

to be a "trash" fish. Most "trash" fish are better fighters than the "game" fish that their fishing for.

Also for the question of who would want to catch a snakehead over a bass, pick me.

Next time you're out fishing do it with an open mind and just enjoy the fight.

Don't hate just appreciate.

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.

To me I enjoy any fish that I catch, there is no garbage fish. I also think it's funny when

I see people whoot and holler when they hook a fish thinking man I got a big one for it to turn out

to be a "trash" fish. Most "trash" fish are better fighters than the "game" fish that their fishing for.

.

LOL AMEN..........although I fish for bass almost exclusivly, it always brings a smile to my face to catch something by "accident" be it pike (some days more pike than bass on "accident"), carp, crappie, bullhead, or whatever............when I lived in florida I was always dissapointed when I caught a gar by accident and couldn't land it, I wanted to see one of those bad boys up close, but I could never get one in with out beeing bit off or the hook was just not set in that rock hard bone of a mouth. Usually one of my best fishing periods of the year up here is when the bass have finished spawning I will go after bullhead for a while, they bite anything and are a blast when the bass seem unwilling to play.

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I never seen another fish eat a bass.

I have seen tiger muskee's bite hooked bass almost in half!

Allen

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I really dont think that snakehead will ever harm the bass population. Largemouth bass are the top predator freshwater fish in the States. I never seen another fish eat a bass. Catfish dont even eat bass, and they eat all kinds of stuff. Northern pike/muskie are very similar to Snakehead. Snakehead as much a threat to bass and as pike/muskie.

Ok, this is incorrect. Largemouth bass may be the most recognizable predator, but they are by no means the TOP predator. Put a 5lb bass in front of a 100lb blue cat or 50lb flathead cat and see what happens. Look how many smallmouth bass in the north have teeth marks on them from musky and pike taking shots at them.

I totally disagree with your post.

Wayne

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I have seen just about every species eat one of their own. Must predators will

eat any fish that is small enough to fit in their mouth. I have seen pike try and

eat other pike that were too big and choked to death on them.

It all goes back to beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

If you like the non native it's alright and if you don't they all should be kill.

Peacock bass - yeaaaa

Snakehead - booooo

One was hyped as good ( peacocks ) and one was hyped as bad ( snakeheads )

both are non native and both compete with largemouth bass, so why give one the

thumbs up and the other the thumbs down? Both are better fighters and the snakehead

is better to eat than the LM bass, so is it really about native species or which had better

marketing?

To me if you ban one you have to ban them all and that's not going to happen, so

just go out, fish and be happy that you caught something.

Scott

P.S. Life is too short to worry about this issue.

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Look how many smallmouth bass in the north have teeth marks on them from musky and pike taking shots at them.  

not eating smallmouth bass, largemouth bass are the bass that never had been eaten by a pike or musky.

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Dude, you are wrong. Bottom line. I tried to be nice about this but....

I dont know that there is a person on here that will agree with your "assumption" that a pike or musky is somehow lower on the food chain than a largemouth. It is simple nature. BIG FISH EAT SMALLER FISH. The fact of the matter is that pike and musky are bigger fish. Granted, a largemouth will eat a small pike or musky. I will give you that. But looking at the two species, with adult examples of each, it is simply incorrect to think that the largemouth is the more dominant predator.

Wayne

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I will give you that. But looking at the two species, with adult examples of each, it is simply incorrect to think that the largemouth is the more dominant predator. I do see your point but

Is there any record of any species that ate a largemouth bass before?

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For you to think that nothing will eat LMB EVER is ridiculous.

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