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brush hoggin

bottom composition for the spawn

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In an article i have recently read it talks about suitable bottom composition is needed for fish to spawn. Can anyone elaborate on that and is there a certian mixture fo rock, gravel, clay, ect. the fish cling to?

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In short you want to find a hard bottom. Basically anything that isn't soft can hold spawning fish. Like you mentioned, rock, gravel, and clay are good examples. If you can find an area like this with stumps or lay downs for cover then that makes it a lot better.

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and even on the roots of lily pads.

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Solid bottom: Bass avoid soft, muck bottoms; instead they prefer to spawn on hard sandy bottoms, gravel or rocky banks, large boulders or even a fallen log or lily pad roots.

Shallow water: The fertilization and hatching process requires the warmth provided by sunlight penetration which is why the fish migrate into shallow water (with the exception of deep, clear western reservoirs); Bass will bed generally in a foot to 6 feet of water but have been known to bed shallow enough to see their backs and as deep as 12 foot.

Protected coves: When possible, bass will bed in water that is sheltered somewhat from the elements like in a cove or pockets.

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Solid bottom: Bass avoid soft, muck bottoms; instead they prefer to spawn on hard sandy bottoms, gravel or rocky banks, large boulders or even a fallen log or lily pad roots.

Shallow water: The fertilization and hatching process requires the warmth provided by sunlight penetration which is why the fish migrate into shallow water (with the exception of deep, clear western reservoirs); Bass will bed generally in a foot to 6 feet of water but have been known to bed shallow enough to see their backs and as deep as 12 foot.

Protected coves: When possible, bass will bed in water that is sheltered somewhat from the elements like in a cove or pockets.

Right on the money. Also bass prefer to spawn against something like a stump, rock, ect. to help protect the nest. And in lakes with soft bottoms fish will spawn ON TOP of cover. In Florida bass spawn on lily pad stems. Here in Kentucky I have seen bass beds on top of stumps. And believe it or not bass will spawn in the branches of standing timber. So look for protected area, hard bottom, and then cover. In that order. If you know where bluegill spawn bass should be in the same areas not exact spots but close.

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Large boulders were mentioned,so does this include like RIP RAP and man made dams made out of boulders?

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Yes.

8-)

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They will spawn anywhere.

Cement stairs leading into the water is one place I can always find a fish bedding. They will acctually have their eggs on one of the stairs. My second most common place to find bedding fish are in old prop-wash holes near docks.

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Silt kills nearly all fishes eggs, so they don't lay eggs in places likely to silt over. Largemouth bass prefer wind protected bays, shallow water 1 foot to whatever good light penetration depth there may be. Smallmouth and spots tend to prefer main lake wind protected areas and secondary points close to the main lake, with sandy or gravel bottoms. Bass lay eggs in more than one nest as a general rule.

The cooler the water the longer it take the eggs to hatch; 60 to 62 degrees about 14 days, 63 to 65 about 10 days, 66 to 68 degrees about 7 days. The warmer the water gets, the faster the eggs hatch, however the warmer the water the more egg eating preditors, like bluegill and carp, there are to steal a meal.

WRB

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Smallmouth and spots tend to prefer main lake wind protected areas and secondary points close to the main lake, with sandy or gravel bottoms.

The sandy bottom makes their beds easy to see as it is just a large white ring. But I have found the bigger smallies will acctually have rocks in their bed for some reason. You will see a perfect white ring, with a few rocks the size of baseballs in them. Not sure if it is for them to hit against to make the eggs come out easier or what. But if I'm bed fishing and come across a smallie over 3.5 pounds, 9/10 times it will have rocks in the middle of its bed. Bassectomy and I realized it this year on one lake, then began noticing it on all lakes. Even on George and Champlain.

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I see a lot of white colored smallie bed RIGHT ON BOULDERS, in 12 to 15 ft of clear to the bottom water.

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The beds can be lighter in color or darker it depends. In rivers that are silty fish look for rocks in creek arms. Usually shallow rip rap. Thats my best spring Ohio River pattern.

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You newbie's writing this down?   ;)

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Seem 'em:

On the top of stumps

On sandy bottoms

On pebbly bottoms

On boulders

On dock ladders

On the deck of a sunken boat

6" to 18ft depths

When they get the urge......... :D

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When they get the urge......... :D

So anywhere a human would? ;D

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I've seen those oddballs spawners too. Personally, when I look at a lake, I look for a relatively solid bottom, some form of cover, like weeds, lay downs, 55 gal. drums, washing machines, LOL, and proximity to deep water. I'm also going to key on structure. Bays and coves off main lake points that feature a strong secondary point are my favorite place to start. One thing to know, if you roll up, and see bedding fish, back off! You need to develop a keen eye to spot potential beds from a distance.

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I have also seen them nowhere near the bottom. I have seen fish on beds in the forks of standing timber in 40 feet of water on the main lake.

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I have also seen them nowhere near the bottom. I have seen fish on beds in the forks of standing timber in 40 feet of water on the main lake.

Witnessed the same thing on Toledo  ;)

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