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Limpinglogan

How old?

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I know there are many variables but generally speaking what are some ball park ages for these size fish. I fish in Michigan so I know that will be different then in Flordia or Mexico.

3lb age?

5lb age?

8lb age?

10lbs age?

again I know there are no clear cut answers but I have no clue about bass ages so I am just wondering.

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i once heard or read that a 5lb bass up north (NY) is approx. 15 years old.  a bass of the same size down south (TX) is approx. 5 years old.  dont know if there is any truth to it or not.

Cliff

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It has to vary by habitat. My mothers pond (in Northern NC) was stocked with Bass 1.5 yrs ago and we are pulling out 4 lbs left and right.

I expect the selected harvest we will be pulling on that pond in a month will show more than a few 5 lbers.

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I think I have the results of a study regarding your query.

The book is in my car so I will try to locate the info and send it later today.

There is a difference in growth rates between northern and southern bass.

In the meantime, maybe someone else can post the data they have.  :)

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Off the top of my head:

Growth is highly variable. Rapid growth more common in the S than the N. N bass live longer (up to 20years). S bass rarely surpass 10.

Averages for northern LM with good growth in CO and NY (where I've fished and looked into it):

3lb age? 7years

5lb age? 10years

8lb age? 10lbs age? These are so rare in the north that it would be case by case. These are special fish that figured something out, are especially aggressive individuals in un-fished waters, or are genetic freaks.

There's data out there. Your DNR will have some for waters in your state.

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Well, this is what I've read regarding smallmouth:

In northern waters, a 5 lb bronzeback will be 10-15 years old

and can live to be around 18.

In southern waters, smallmouth can reach 5 lbs in 4-6 years,

but only live to be 9 or 10. Southern brown fish remain active

all year, but they can be very hard to come by in the summer.

8-)

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It has to vary by habitat.  

I would say it varies mostly based upon availability of food.  Those first fish that were stocked do not have any competition from bass larger than them so they grow fast.

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It has to vary by habitat.

I would say it varies mostly based upon availability of food. Those first fish that were stocked do not have any competition from bass larger than them so they grow fast.

Nope, it's all about metabolism = water temperatures.

When you add stocker trout to the equation, you grow

monsters!

8-)

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Limpinglogan, below is a link for an age to length comparison for bass in Northern Illinois which should be fairly similar to Southern Michigan.  

http://www.windycityfishing.com/bass_age_chart.htm

To determine the weight that goes with the length you can use the BassResource.com weight calculator to get some estimates.

http://www.bassresource.com/bassfishing/fishcalculator.html

Or you can use this link which would give you a ballpark figure for the weight associated with a certain length.

http://www.windycityfishing.com/bass_conversion_chart.htm

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If those are smallies you're talking about.  I think I might have to take a trip to washington one day soon.

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You can figure length to weight, there isn't a accurate formula for length to age, too many variables. Mass can be calculated, the IGFA formula doesn't work well for bass, it was developed for tuna. Use L x L X G/1200 for bass as a basic formula weight to length formula that is appropriate for bass.

L = length with mouth closed to center of the tail, G= girth around the widest area with the dorsal fin down.

Age is dependant on the water temperature during the yearly cycle, available food, cover and species of bass. For example a bass could live for 10 years and only be 2 or 3 pounds, if the lake or pond was over populated for the food available. The longest living bass recorded was 23 years, a smallmouth bass in Mass, as I recall. The longest living largemouth would be about 18 years. In California the Florida strain bass live about 15 years maximum, 12 years on average. Northern strain up to 17 years, both under ideal conditions.

WRB

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M Starr wrote on Yesterday at 11:56pm:

It has to vary by habitat. My mothers pond (in Northern NC) was stocked with Bass 1.5 yrs ago and we are pulling out 4 lbs left and right.

First, are you SURE these fish are "4 lbers"? Is this a guestimate, or on a good scale? A 4lber, if it's fat, will be in the 19" class.

tyrius. wrote on Today at 9:44am:

I would say it varies mostly based upon availability of food. Those first fish that were stocked do not have any competition from bass larger than them so they grow fast.

This is pretty much right on.

Available food does matter. Despite what one might assume, Bob Lusk has mentioned that growth periods in the N and S are actually very similar in duration. The growth period, as roadwarrior mentions, is based on metabolism and is the duration of time falling within the best growth temperature range. In the S, hot summers reduce the growth period. According to Bob, the N and S are pretty close in duration of growth period. What's different, he says, between N and S (besides florida strain bass and trout stocking) is food production, which is many times greater in the S than the N.

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I would say it varies mostly based upon availability of food. Those first fish that were stocked do not have any competition from bass larger than them so they grow fast.

Nope, it's all about metabolism = water temperatures.

When you add stocker trout to the equation, you grow

monsters!

Hmm, you're point seems to reinforce mine.  Your point of stocker trout is directly in line with what I say.

In warmer water (south) bream spawn more often leading to more available food for the bass.  

In warmer water fish (both bass and baitfish) are more active and are able to digest their food more quickly.  Being more active means that they eat more and put on more weight.

It all comes down to available food.  Beyond gross generalizations it's impossible to tell the age of a fish by it's length or weight.  I've fished ponds where I could catch fish about every other cast but nearly every single one was under a pound.  That pond was overpopulated and the fish didn't have enough food to put on weight.  On the flip side, my in laws moved into an "active adult" community with a fishing pond.  It is a new pond and I primarily catch 2-3 pounders there.  That's because those fish don't have any competition from an older class of bass and were able to catch more food.  

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M Starr wrote on Yesterday at 11:56pm:
It has to vary by habitat. My mothers pond (in Northern NC) was stocked with Bass 1.5 yrs ago and we are pulling out 4 lbs left and right.

First, are you SURE these fish are "4 lbers"? Is this a guestimate, or on a good scale? A 4lber, if it's fat, will be in the 19" class.

The real questions should be, what size bass were stocked and are you SURE that there weren't any fish in there prior to stocking.

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I'm no scientist but I think both environment and available food must play a factor. A 10 year old fish in one body of water might be 4 lb. while just down the road in another body of water loaded with food higher in fat content such as shad, a 10 year old fish might weigh 6-7 lb.

Metabolism is a factor of temperature hence the larger fish per age on average down south. No definitive answers to posted question. Too many variables.

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Despite what one might assume, Bob Lusk has mentioned that growth periods in the N and S are actually very similar in duration.

Here's the post.

http://www.bassresource.com/bass_fishing_forums/YaBB.pl?num=1213780421/6#6

Suggest  reading the entire thread; Lusk clearly states the bass's growth is controlled by the available food source. San Diego's average year around temperature is 70 degrees, rarely above 90 or below 60, day and night, right in the middle of Lusks optimum temperature growth range. The big issue with northern bass is the extreme water temperatures; ice over to high temp/humidity. Little growth going on when the water freezes over and good growth for a few months before high temps/humidity take over. California purduced 15 lb NLMB before the FLMB were introduced, due to optium growth conditions for bass.

WRB

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Suggest reading the entire thread; Lusk clearly states the bass's growth is controlled by the available food source.

And that's exactly what I've been saying in this thread.

Maybe I should suggest that you reread this thread!   ;D

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The thread on bass growth rate is a good one and I do remember it. My impression of the original post in this thread was that he already understands there is no clear-cut way to exactly match age and size in bass. I thought he was seeking some kind of ball park figure for an average bass in an average lake in his state, Michigan, with normal forage opportunities.

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What appears to lost in the translation is; you can't predict a bass weight bassed on age. Mature female bass always out weigh mature male bass of the same age, when everything else is equal. Every bass is a little different in how aggressive it may be. The more aggressive, the more they eat, the bigger they can grow and the faster, however they can also be harvested faster because of their aggressive behavior.

Climate has a major impact on growth rates; cold low water conditions verses warm high water has a major impact on recruitment and prey sources in the same lake.

To say a 15" bass is 4 years old is simply wrong, it could be 2 or 12 years old! The only way to know for sure is to examine the inner ear, scale rings are not reliable, you can estimate the age with a scale exam.

The fastest bass growth rate that I know of was lake Isabella during the late 80's; several 18 lb bass were 8 years old, varified by biologist examination. However the Isabella bass never had a chance to grow larger due to severe drought and over harvesting.

WRB

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This is a good post. No issues here that I can see. A ballpark, as SEnile1 mentions, is really what is appropriate here as it covers most fish in most waters. The rest fleshes things out in better detail -interesting stuff.

California purduced 15 lb NLMB before the FLMB were introduced, due to optium growth conditions for bass.

That's really interesting, and telling. Thanks WRB.

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