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Hammer 4

Hook Set

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Hope this is the correct place for this ?

In the last couple of fishin trips, I've had more lmb get off then I have in the last month. I usr gammy or owner hooks depending on what's in stock. I use 2/0 to 5/0 ewg offset hooks for worms, hooks are new, but for some reason I'm losing fish.. :-[

Oh I should say they usually get off when they jump, or are on the surface.

Any thoughts..?

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Funny you should mention that ...I did that the last fish I lost..

Keep the rod tip down and try to keep them from breaking water.

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spool on some good braid. lock down the drag. keep a good pair of pliers handy.  you'll need 'em. ;)

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spool on some good braid. lock down the drag. keep a good pair of pliers handy. you'll need 'em. ;)

Maybe a hook sharpner as well. Changing line would be the first thing I'd do as well.

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Maintain constant tension on your line at all times. I.E., do your best to prevent them from jumping. Since you mention jumping, this is probably the likely cause. When you allow them to jump you no longer have the proper tension on the line to keep them on.  The size of the fish and the weight of the lure play a role, but bottom line, do not allow slack in the line at any time during the fight.

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Maintain constant tension on your line at all times. I.E., do your best to prevent them from jumping. Since you mention jumping, this is probably the likely cause. When you allow them to jump you no longer have the proper tension on the line to keep them on. The size of the fish and the weight of the lure play a role, but bottom line, do not allow slack in the line at any time during the fight.

Also do not point the rod directly at the fish. Keep a constant bend in the rod when attempting to keep them from jumping. Sweep the rod low and to the side and keep it bent,maybe put the tip in the water,but don't point it at the fish.If the fish is charging away and or pulling drag do not reel at the same time.Use the rod in an attempt to control the direction and turn the head.Any slack or loose line must be quickly taken up and constant tension maintained.

I am sure others might disagree but it seems there are certain days when it is just difficult to keep them pegged depending on how they hit.Are they sucking it up and causing a heavy feeling or slashing at it? The quick slash hits can sometimes cause a poor hookup since they swipe at it so quick in an attempt to wound it or ****** it away from other fish in the area.Change colors or add scent sometimes works.

If you say you are using owner and gammy hooks there should be no problems.Are the hooks large enough for the bait your using? too small of a hook will cause the bait to ball up and plug the gap with plastic on the hookset.

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Food for thought: a good hookset is a function of speed more than power. You are not getting a good hookset. If you stop the fish from jumping you are missing a good part of the battle.

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Usually when I have a student missing fish or having them come unbuttoned it's from being to slow pulling the trigger. Like George said speed is the key not power and not just speed on the hook set but setting the at the first sign of a bite.

Bass don't have hands so drop the rod, reel the slack, & set the hook. ;)

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I believe I will have to go with Catt and George on this one. A proper hook set is important. This does not sound at all like equipment failure but maybe choice of equipment can be part of the equation. I have seen many of lost fish due to wrong choice of rods primairly in choice of action. This is very important in treble hook baits such as cranks and jerks. Using Fast or XFast Action and not keeping proper tension on equates to lost fish. This type of fishing requires a Moderate Action. Take a better look at hookset and equipment choice. I rarely miss a fish T-Rigging and use both Med and Med H with a XFast Action but as Catt states. Bow to the fish and then let them have it. IMHO

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Always try to keep your rod at right angles to the fish and keep tension on it. If your rod is pointed at the fish, you're dropping your odds of landing it, especially if it runs toward you. If you like watching the fight, let 'em jump. Be prepared to lose a bunch as that's when they will throw the hook. I keep the rod down to discourage this.

Some will jump no matter what you do though. Losing fish is part of the game but you should be able to improve your odds. Sharp hooks will make a smaller hole in the fishes mouth preventing the hook(s) from working their way out.

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Good tips! I don't think it's your hookset, I set the hook as if it's a hawg evertime. Here's a few fishing landing tips....

  • Again, set the hook as if it's the last fish you'll ever catch!

  • Avoid multiple hooksets (personal experience).

  • Always keep constant pressure on the line.

  • Do not be too agressive, let your drag work for you.

  • Aim your rod tip in the opposite direction of the fish's head.

  • Rod tip down when the fish tries to break the water.

  • Remember constant pressure when landing the fish.

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One thing I would ask is what bait are you using? IF it is bulky bait or a that has a tendency to slide down the hook on the hook set it could be keeping you from getting a solid hook set.  If this is a tube or beaver style bait try placing a tooth pick thru bait into the hook eye to hold it on place.   One thing is if your are casting at a distance make sure you are using the proper rod not to wimpy rod and not to stiff a rod.  A stiff rod will not allow enough bend to help you keep the line tight when a fish tries to jump on the other hand a wimpy rod will not let you stick the fish solid.  Flipping sticks are just that great for flipping and close quarters where you will get the fish in quick and there is not much playing the fish.  These are just some thoughts on some things that could be happening that are in messing with your hook set.

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You have to keep constant tension on the line the enitre time when trying to land a fish.  As soon as there is slack in the line (especially when fish jump)  the fish can toss the lure.  One way to eliminate the slack in the line is to use braid.  Sure, you cant use it in all conditions ( ie clear water) but when you can, use it!  I prefer 30 lb Sufix Performance Braid for the baitcaster.  It is a little limper than most braids.   For the spinners I recommend 20 to 30 lb Power Pro.  Just personal prefrence though.  A lot of guys like Fireline and Spiderwire.  I personally have had bad experiences with both.

Good Fishing Everyone!! 8-)

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Great info..!!  My rod is a 6'6" med fast action, bait is mainly roboworms..after reading all of the replies I'm pretty sure it's my fault for having a 1..slow hookset..2..not keeping the rod at the correct angle, and 3rd allowing some slack in the line for a split second..

90% of the get off's happend with a texas rig with a non pegged bullet.

Thanks for all the info..you guys rock.. 8-)

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The one thing I didn't see mentioned was to get all slack out of the line BEFORE you set. Then hit em sharply.  Most times I see people having trouble, it's when they try to rush and don't take up all the slack first...  which can cause a few different problems- but all result in the same thing... a missed or lost fish.

Once hooked, a t-rig (especially) w/o a pegged weight is rarely lost.  I like to watch em' jump and make a ruckus, it's part of the reason Bass are so well liked.   :)

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I think I've made that mistake re: the slack in my hurry to get the fish..from now on, I'm making a Effort to reel down and set the hook, instead of just pulling up hard. Thanks again!!

The one thing I didn't see mentioned was to get all slack out of the line BEFORE you set. Then hit em sharply. Most times I see people having trouble, it's when they try to rush and don't take up all the slack first... which can cause a few different problems- but all result in the same thing... a missed or lost fish.

Once hooked, a t-rig (especially) w/o a pegged weight is rarely lost. I like to watch em' jump and make a ruckus, it's part of the reason Bass are so well liked. :)

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You are using premium hooks, rod about right, line wasn't defined.

Roboworms are very soft, so you shouldn't have a problem with penetration of the hook point.

Two things come to mind; spawning bass don't eat your worm, they kill it or move it and easily can miss the hook point. The second is putting the hook eye too far into the worm nose; it should be flush or only in about 1/16". Too much worm can fill the hook gap. If your worm come back bunched up in the hook throat, you may need to skin hook the worm. Off set J bend hooks don't work well for Texas rigged worms, IMO. The straight shank sproat style hook is better for hook ratation.

Keep the rod loaded up and enjoy your fishing.

WRB

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Constant pressure is the most important thing once you have the fish hooked IMO. Like other said, if you see the bass approaching the surface keep the rod tip down and never have the rod pointing directly at the bass. Never have slack line.

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Sorry, I should have listed my line, which Izorline XXX 12lb test.

See, this is whats makes this site so cool, as everyone had great advice. WRB, I think you also have hit on one of my sore spots, as I tend to bury the eyelet quite a bit..I'll stop..I did use a couple of straight shanked hooks, then switched, the ewg offsets seem to get hung up more too..So, I'll take your advice, and put to use.. ;) Thanks again to everyone!  8-)

You are using premium hooks, rod about right, line wasn't defined.

Roboworms are very soft, so you shouldn't have a problem with penetration of the hook point.

Two things come to mind; spawning bass don't eat your worm, they kill it or move it and easily can miss the hook point. The second is putting the hook eye too far into the worm nose; it should be flush or only in about 1/16". Too much worm can fill the hook gap. If your worm come back bunched up in the hook throat, you may need to skin hook the worm. Off set J bend hooks don't work well for Texas rigged worms, IMO. The straight shank sproat style hook is better for hook ratation.

Keep the rod loaded up and enjoy your fishing.

WRB

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Wery good advice from all of you guys. I'd like to add some of my observations:

1-brand and type of line used (how much strech?)is important.

2- distance between the REEL and the fish at the moment of the bite. By this I meen how much line do you have between hook and reel. Some of you will say: "what does it matter?". Well, i think it matters a lot. Some fishing lines strech pretty much, even over 10%. Now, if you cast out a bait at 60-70 ft and you have a bite on the drop, and you hold the rod at say 45 degree angle , when setting the hook the tip of your rod will move about 5-6 feet, maybe a bit more. If the line beeing used has a 10% strech, your line will strech about 6-7ft on the hookset, that's MORE than the distance your rod tip is traveling. In this case the hook will barely penetrate the skin in the fishes' mouth, without penetrating the bones. The strech of the line is "progressive": more pressure , more strech.

3-Lenght of rod, power and action is VERY important. The farther away we fish (longer cast) the longer the rod should be( 7ft, or even more). We shoud use the most powerfull rods that will handle the bait (step up to MH, insted of medium). The faster the action the better for fishing soft plastics (in tis case), and a lot of other baits: go for X-fast or fast; mod fast is not so good!

Hope it helps,Alex

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