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Weights Of Soft Plastics

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Does anyone roughly know what a 5" Yamamoto senko weighs? What about a 4" Zoom fluke? Does anyone know of a chart that would list weights on plastic lures?

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The 5" senko weighs about 3/8 oz. No idea about the fluke.

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I've thought about this myself. Anyone with a postal scale (or something similar) who's got time on their hands? :)

I'd love to know the weights of the following:

  1. super fluke
  2. super fluke jr
  3. trick work
  4. magnum trick worm
  5. sweet beaver
  6. horny toad
  7. lizard

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I've thought about this myself. Anyone with a postal scale (or something similar) who's got time on their hands? :)

I'd love to know the weights of the following:

  1. super fluke
  2. super fluke jr
  3. trick work
  4. magnum trick worm
  5. sweet beaver
  6. horny toad
  7. lizard

I can tell you a few of those tomorrow and if anyone else has any suggestions post them up.

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I'd be curious what use this information would be.

I generally make a simple line in the sand: too light to throw on casting gear, and heavy enough to throw on casting gear.

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Just curiosity I guess. With the different rating poles I have, I am always analyzing what lure to throw on what rod and got to wondering if anyone else ever thought or weighed individual soft plastics.

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I'd be curious what use this information would be.

I generally make a simple line in the sand: too light to throw on casting gear, and heavy enough to throw on casting gear.

X2

Just go fishing !

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Just curiosity I guess. With the different rating poles I have, I am always analyzing what lure to throw on what rod and got to wondering if anyone else ever thought or weighed individual soft plastics.

Go by feel, not by marketing. Use the force Luke!

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Go by feel, not by marketing. Use the force Luke!

What he said.

I regularly throw a 3/16 ounce jig on a MH rod that is rated for 1/4-1 ounce jigs. At the same time, I throw 3/4 ounce spinnerbaits on a rod rated for 5/8 ounce; the rod performs better with that bigger head and larger blades. Works perfect for that rod. There are instances in which you want to stay pretty close to that rating, but it's very much determined on a rod to rod basis.

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What he said.

I regularly throw a 3/16 ounce jig on a MH rod that is rated for 1/4-1 ounce jigs. At the same time, I throw 3/4 ounce spinnerbaits on a rod rated for 5/8 ounce; the rod performs better with that bigger head and larger blades. Works perfect for that rod. There are instances in which you want to stay pretty close to that rating, but it's very much determined on a rod to rod basis.

X2, I throw 3/4oz spinnerbaits on a Medium rod, and I seem to do just fine.

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I disagree that this information is useless.

Now if you want it to help with rod selection then your barking up the wrong tree. But that information for fall rates would be very useful.

Boyd Duckett says that fall rate is one of the most important factors for him and one that amateurs don't pay enough attention to. But in this case he was talking about weights

Now will changing a lure with different fall rate make you your catch rate go up like a rocket, Nope.

But maybe using a senko with a different fall rate will help you put in that last fish for a limit.

The biggest details are ones that we don't always think about. This might be one of those things that can give you that slight edge on the competition.

It be cool to get a group of guys together to test this theory and see what we could find. Might be something interesting.

I'll be weighing some plastics tonight. :D

Capt.O

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i was alawys thinking to myself this question.

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Weight has less effect on fall rate than shape, density, and saltiness.

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If anyone feels this info isn't any use to them, just don't read this thread :P

Personally I'm curious to see how similar baits across manufacturers differ without having to buy each type. But if you have no interest, feel free to move on to the next topic :)

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Knowledge is key? Knowing what to do with useful knowledge is key. But what is useful? Knowing the exact weights of a 3" and 5" Senko will not put more fish in the boat. Knowing that a 5" senko falls faster than a 3" senko might put more fish in the boat. Knowing that a Trick Worm sinks very slowly, even a big one, compared to a senko might put more fish in the boat, even though a 6" Trick Worm weighs less than 5" senko. Knowing a specification doesn't make you any smarter. Knowing how that spec affects the bait is another story.

Wisdom > knowledge.

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Knowledge is key? Knowing what to do with useful knowledge is key. But what is useful? Knowing the exact weights of a 3" and 5" Senko will not put more fish in the boat. Knowing that a 5" senko falls faster than a 3" senko might put more fish in the boat. Knowing that a Trick Worm sinks very slowly, even a big one, compared to a senko might put more fish in the boat, even though a 6" Trick Worm weighs less than 5" senko. Knowing a specification doesn't make you any smarter. Knowing how that spec affects the bait is another story.

Wisdom > knowledge.

Thanks Confucius :)

So because you personally don't see any value in getting this question answered means that it can't be valuable to anyone???

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I think knowing drop rates weights is important. It occurs to me that there are other factors besides actual weight of the bait being used that could effect drop rates.

Lb test of the line being used. size & type of hook being used, tx rigged or wacky rigged, shape of bait, how windy is it? - These are a number of factors that come to mind after a few moments of thinking about it - I'm pretty sure that there are more factors than I've listed.

Despite that, I think it would be good to know which, among several similar sized and shaped baits actually weighed more, and whether or not it was enough to make a difference.

Somewhere in my shop, left over from the days when I dabbled in the consumption and marketing of recreational herbs and chemicals, I have an electronic scale that weighs down to the gram.

I think the next rainy day when I have nothing scheduled, I'll ice down a few cold ones and start weighing. It can't hurt and I might learn something. I'll report at a later date.

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Thanks Confucius :)

So because you personally don't see any value in getting this question answered means that it can't be valuable to anyone???

Tell me one time that knowing a 1/2 oz. jig was really 0.45 oz., or that a 5" senko weighs 5/16 oz. (real examples) was the difference in putting fish in the boat.

Its MY OPINION that it doesn't matter, and I told you the reason I thought is wasn't important. All I've heard is that it "would help" or is "interesting to know."

BTW, some colors of senkos weigh differently than other colors. Boggles the mind. I'm a details guy, don't get me wrong, but this level of minutia isn't all that imporant.

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Francho your thinking about this in the wrong way.

I'm not talking about comparing a trick worm to a senko. I'm talking about comparing a 5in senko to another 5in senko but have a different weight.

In other words think of a line of senko's with a Fast fall rate a slow fall rate and a floater.

Same bait but depending on the conditions you can use it in different ways.

If I'm fishing a C-Ring,Shaky head, or T-rig I would use the floater cause I want it to be just above the bottom.

If I'm going down a bank in summer and I'm fish a weightless senko I'd us one with a fast fall rate so I can hit my spots and move on.

If it’s cold and I need a nice slow fall I'd use the slow fall rate.

Custom soft plastics guys have been doing this for years so what is so different in applying the same principles to brand name baits?

Rick Clunn has made a living off of fishing the same bait as everyone else is but in different ways or modifying them a bit.

Thinking outside the box never hurts in bass fishing and it’s not like we are shooting in the dark. We know that fall rates affect the fish. All that’s left to do is measure the elements and see what we can come up with. Just so happens that we are considering the element of weight here.

Just remember that geniuses have been called fools by those with more "Wisdom".

Not say this would be ground breaking but hey we all love tinkering with tackle and this might turn out to be interesting.

Capt.O

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I'm not talking about comparing a trick worm to a senko. I'm talking about comparing a 5in senko to another 5in senko but have a different weight.

I already told you that different color senkos don't all weigh exactly 5/16 oz. What do you do with that?

I figure this stuff out on the water, not in the lab. I don't pour my own - no need to.

What I'm telling you is that I weighed some stuff, and it never made any difference in my on the water fishing. It over complicates things.

Thinking in relative terms - this bait is smaller, falls faster, has more salt, etc. - has served me better.

The Original Post was about bait ratings on rods. I say tie it on, and try it out. If it works, have at it. If not, try a different rod.

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Rather judge your question, I went to the scale and weighed some lures

Lures weights are notoriously variant, so I weighed several lures to give you a mean weight:

Zoom 4" Super Fluke Jr.......67 grains

Yamamoto 5" Senko...........164 grains

At 67 grains, the 4" fluke falls between 1/8 oz (55 grains) and 3/16oz (80 grains)

At 164 grains, the 5" senko weighs exactly 3/8 oz, which is 165 grains.

Roger

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I already told you that different color senkos don't all weigh exactly 5/16 oz. What do you do with that?

I figure this stuff out on the water, not in the lab. I don't pour my own - no need to.

What I'm telling you is that I weighed some stuff, and it never made any difference in my on the water fishing. It over complicates things.

Thinking in relative terms - this bait is smaller, falls faster, has more salt, etc. - has served me better.

The Original Post was about bait ratings on rods. I say tie it on, and try it out. If it works, have at it. If not, try a different rod.

Warning taken J but I'm going to be a idiot and try it anyway cause I enjoy doing it and it would be fun. I got nothing to loose and I'm sure I'll learn something even if its not what I expected to learn.

Capt.O

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Knowledge is key? Knowing what to do with useful knowledge is key. But what is useful? Knowing the exact weights of a 3" and 5" Senko will not put more fish in the boat. Knowing that a 5" senko falls faster than a 3" senko might put more fish in the boat. Knowing that a Trick Worm sinks very slowly, even a big one, compared to a senko might put more fish in the boat, even though a 6" Trick Worm weighs less than 5" senko. Knowing a specification doesn't make you any smarter. Knowing how that spec affects the bait is another story.

Wisdom > knowledge.

Yes that is great info, but the OP specifically asked,

Does anyone roughly know what a 5" Yamamoto senko weighs? What about a 4" Zoom fluke? Does anyone know of a chart that would list weights on plastic lures?

I think its a very valid question if he's trying to get an idea of the weights he's normally throwing so he can get a rod that will be very close to his baits.

I think this is a great forum and has a ton of great info, but sometimes the OP just needs a basic answer.

Respectfully,

Brian

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