Jump to content

Do I Need A Baitcasting Setup?


Recommended Posts

Hey guys, I've been a saltwater fisherman for a few years and decided to try fresh this year. I've got a few months under my belt at this point.

I fish from the bank in a few lakes and ponds near my house. The lake I fish primarily is pretty heavy with weeds and cover, and I have had most of my luck this spring/summer fishing texas-rigged plastics(summer) and hard jerkbaits(spring). All of this with a spinning setup. I haven't had any luck on crankbaits, but would like to keep giving this a try.

I'd like to give a bait caster a try, but is there any reason why I would need it? Will I have an easier time fishing through heavy cover? Could it improve my crank bait presentation?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have salt water spinning gear you probably have heavy enough tackle for any bass fishing. If you want to try baitcasting I certainly wouldn't discourage you. Baitcasting gear handles heavier lines more easily and retrieves baits with a lot of resistance (deep cranks, heavy spinners...) more easily. Being able to use both spinning and casting gear opens up possibilities thus enhancing the fishing experience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

No, you don't need a b/c to catch big bass. I don't own a b/c and I catch nice bass from shore all the time using bass size spinning gear. I seldom use cranks as I fish heavy weeded areas too, my presentations are pretty much what yours are, just keep at it. IMO the only reason to use a b/c with heavier line is fighting the weeds not the fish.

Myself also being primarily a saltwater fisherman, find it more satisfying to catch bass on light tackle, b/c take the fun and fight out of for it me. I don't really care if I lose a fish in the weeds or not, I'll just go catch another.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You should go for it. It's a lot more fun using the baitcaster may it be saltwater or fresh water. The only time i needed a spinning is when throwing weightless lures. Try the curado 50e or any of the calcutta TE 50/100/200 GT , I bet you'll find it hard to go back to spinners once you learn how to use it.

The CTE 100 GT is a great dual purpose reel size, freshwater and saltwater use.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They dont list it on the site. What about the "Code" from Quantum?

Never had a problem with any Quantum product I have owned. Some people here hate their stuff, but I don't know why... Diawa hasn't been to bad either - same with the Pinnacle set up's my buddies have.

I'd start out learning to cast with braided line. It tends to backlash less and it's also easier to pick out if you do backlash.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For a reel I think it is hard to beat a Lews Speed Spool for the price or maybe you can find a good deal on a used Curado. Try the Flea Market section of the forums and see what people have.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would say No you don't need a baitcaster either. I fish from the bank as well and I do have 5 baitcast setups but this year they are seeing limited usage. Most of my spinning gear is Quantum reels loaded with either 30# Cajun braid or 30# Power Pro braid and they make fishing around those trees and bushes and weeds lining the shore at some lakes easier to fish around. I fish everything on spinning gear from shallow cranks to frogs and 1 oz. jigs on my spinning gear.

If you do try it step upto at least the Quantum Catalyst or one of the PT series reels and you will do just fine. You can find a NIB Catalyst in either the freshwater or saltwater version for around $100 or less on ebay.

Welcome to the board also

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

I say yes you do for a couple reasons. First you need to help keep companies that cater to us fishermen in business. :)

The second reason is for personal enjoyment. I fished spinning gear my whole life. Started using baitcasting gear last year. I enjoy it more than spinning, maybe because it is new to me? If you enjoy it as I do, then one or two baitcasting outfits won't be enough. You will definitely be fulfilling reason number one. LOL. A year from now you could invite me to go fishing with you, and let me try some of your new outfits. :lol: :lol: They are sure to be different than mine.

I'm sure you already know that using a baitcasting reel is going to take some practice on your part. Any time my casting area is restricted, I have to switch to a spinning rod because of a lack of casting skill. I have learned to pitch, but haven't tried it on water yet. Also all my fishing last year was from shore. Got a Porta-Bote this summer. Casting room is no longer an issue. :)

As many have stated, you don't NEED a baitcasting outfit. However, you SHOULD buy one.....or two........or....

If you are concerned about spending a lot to get started, then I would definitely be looking at the classifieds for a quality used rod and reel. Occasionally you can find a quality combo offered for sale. However, there are some pretty good new reels out there for $100 or less. I tend to stick with name brands which is why I often buy used or when something I want goes on closeout. Like the as yet unfished 51E for $98. :o

Whereabouts in NJ do you live? I travel to Warren, NJ for my job. I'd be willing to bring some outfits along for you to try if the drive wouldn't be too far. I will make you unravel your own bird nests though. :P:lol:

EDIT: I went to baitcasting gear because I didn't care for the long reach for line pickup needed with the spinning reels I was using. A side benefit is the lighter weight of the baitcasting combos. HOWEVER, I never felt fishing with the heavier gear all day was too much for me. The sun. Yes. The weight. No.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I prefer BC's but you do not need one. Having said that everyone I know that bought a baitcaster and spent the time to learn to use it now prefers baitcasters. If you aren't willing to spend the time don't bother!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I own both, and am proficient with both, but prefer spinning for most techniques. I don't find baitcasters to be any more accurate than a spinning rig, either.

The only time(s) I reach for a casting setup over spinning is lipless cranks and spinner/chatterbaits, but I do have a spinning setup for them as well. For contact baits I stick to spinning gear.

So no, you don't need baitcasting gear at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, you don't need a baitcaster, but think of it as a new way to fish. I hate the line twist associated with spinning reels and yes, even with high quality swivels, I still get them. The only lures I use spinning gear for are drop shots, small rooster tails and size 5 or smaller rapalas.

Once you get the hang of baitcasting you should try fly fishing. At least you don't have to worry about a birdsnest with the fly rod.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

As others have said, the short answer is no. With the proper equipment you can fish any style or bait with spinning gear. Using super lines you can have plenty of line capacity with reels that would be inadequate with heavy mono.

I do prefer baitcast for most bass fishing techniques. I use spinning only for baits that are too light to comfortably fish with baitcast. The only way to see which you prefer is to learn to use a baitcaster. It really is not rocket science, and you just might find it works better for you. As the old TV commercial used to say, "Try it , you'll like it!"

EDIT: I also use spinning gear and light line instead of baitcast in ultra clear water when nothing else will do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Super User

Need, no. Would you enjoy the added control and accuracy? My moneys on yes.

Control and accuracy is something you obtain with practice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Baitcasting gear handles heavier lines more easily and retrieves baits with a lot of resistance (deep cranks, heavy spinners...)

^^^

for bottom baits i try to use a spinning setup when i can get away with it as you dont have to strip line to get a vertical fall. im probably in the minority however...

i use a baitcaster for moving baits 1/4oz or greater and bottom baits of maybe 3/8oz plus plastic and up. i agree with most posts above, you do not need a baitcaster.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Got a BC setup for my birthday today. Took the day off and hit the lake this morning, pulled in a 15 incher on it (my biggest since I started bass fishing this spring). First time I've ever caught anything on a crankbait :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Congrats on your first carankbait bass! :cool-3854:

Oh, by the way, I consulted that well-known tackle expert, the Bait Monkey, and he said you don't need a baitcasting rig, you need a half a dozen or so.

Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Unfortunately, your content contains terms that we do not allow. Please edit your content to remove the highlighted words below.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


  • fishing reel

    fishing forum

    Outboard Engine

    fishing forum

    fishing tackle

    fishing

    fishing

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.