Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
psuangler91

Lead Or Tungsten?

Recommended Posts

I'm going to really start punching mats this spring and I am looking to stock up on gear. I know what baits, skirts, and hooks I'm going to use but I'm not sure about the weights. I want to use 3/4 or 1 oz but the tungsten are so expensive 2 are $6.50 and if I use lead they're 10 for $2.50. Is there a difference? would you recommend using one over another? If there is an advantage to tungsten then I don't care about the price but if there isn't then I don't want to go and spend 5 or 6 times as much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not really worried about the sensitivity, but I think I'll buy a couple tungsten weights and some lead and if the size makes that much of a difference I'll just start buying tungsten exclusively.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use both

I don't mind a lead 1/4oz on a big worm

But I like tungsten for pitching smaller craws as it is less "overwhelming" compared to the bait and appears more natural.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for texas rigging curly tail worms and creatures I only use lead bullets sinkers from 1/8 to 1/4 oz I'm just trying to figure out what kind of weight to use for punchin through mats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll tag on to this original question and say that I AM curious about the sensitivity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your punching, check out Miller's punching weights. Not the cheapest but probably worth looking at. I have not used these YET, so I'm not able to give any feedback.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use tungsten for punching. It's about 1/2 the size of lead, the painted weights are slippery, and when the bullet smashes the punch skirt, it's louder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for texas rigging curly tail worms and creatures I only use lead bullets sinkers from 1/8 to 1/4 oz I'm just trying to figure out what kind of weight to use for punchin through mats.

3/4 to 1.25 oz depending on growth. Tungsten with R.I. Sweet Beaver and Paycheck Punch skirt is the nuts IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3/4 to 1.25 oz depending on growth. Tungsten with R.I. Sweet Beaver and Paycheck Punch skirt is the nuts IMO.

haha Thanks that is the exact set up I plan on using, I bought some havoc pit boss's too because they were on sale and I thought I'd give em a try, we'll see which one performs better. I decided I'm definitely going tungsten because of size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided I'm definitely going tungsten because of size.

The size is the vantage point, what got me was a clearance sale. Got enough to last a while until I find another clearance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the big advantages of tungsten not mentioned very often is that it helps with hooksets. A bass can latch onto lead with it's teeth making hooksets more difficult. Tungsten is so hard the teeth don't dig into the weight so less force is required to set the hook. Not even to mention the Tungsten weight is smaller which helps as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the big advantages of tungsten not mentioned very often is that it helps with hooksets. A bass can latch onto lead with it's teeth making hooksets more difficult. Tungsten is so hard the teeth don't dig into the weight so less force is required to set the hook. Not even to mention the Tungsten weight is smaller which helps as well.

I saw Mark Pack on big bass battle talking about this. When a bass bites sometimes it will grab the lead and when we go to set the hook the lead comes out first opening the basses jaws before the hook can be set. He showed a way to tie a knot so that if a bass did grab the lead the hook kind of pivots upwards almost setting itself. I haven't tried it but it looked very interesting to say the least. Maybe someone can find the video and post it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

-Tungsten is 25% smaller then same size dimension lead, so it will slip threw cover easier and be more compact.

-Tungsten transmits the bottom makeup better and allows you to feel subtle bites easier.

-Tungsten comes in more diverse colors.

-Tungsten is rounded smooth so it won't fray and cut your line like lead.

-Tungsten is non-toxic, so it's environmentally friendly.

-Tungsten is BETTER!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This all sounds "cut and paste" from the interwebz....

-Tungsten is 25% smaller then same size dimension lead, so it will slip threw cover easier and be more compact.

True, but it can be so much smaller, that a broad 1/8 oz. tin bullet weight will get through cover with a thick plastic than a tine tungsten weight.

-Tungsten transmits the bottom makeup better and allows you to feel subtle bites easier.

Feel bites better? That would line and rod sensitivity, not from the weight. I can still tell bottom composition with other metals - today's rods are leaps and bounds more sensitive than days past. In other words, the added information is moot.

-Tungsten comes in more diverse colors.

Any weight can and has been be painted.

-Tungsten is rounded smooth so it won't fray and cut your line like lead.

Lead is soft, and does not cut line.

-Tungsten is non-toxic, so it's environmentally friendly.

While lead may not sound environment friendly, in it's state as a fishing weight it is inert, and requires some other chemical or heat applied to be toxic.

-Tungsten is BETTER!!!!!!

I agree, 90% of the time, but that is just my opinion. ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should not speak for jfranco, but I have a feeling that post he dissected may have been triggered by some matter of fact type posting from one of the members here....

Truth is, ALL this stuff is opinion/personal preference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, rarely use anything but tungsten, but not for the reasons listed above, which look suspiciously cut and paste from some ad hype. I like tungsten mostly for reasons I listed way above, in post #8. Keep in mind I live in NY, where sale of lead weights is prohibited. It's simply easier to buy tungsten.

;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jfrancho I never knew lead had an inert state. I always just figured lead was lead. If what you say is true (and I have no reason to doubt) why all the hype about it? Everything thing with lead says this product is known to the state of blah blah we've all seen it a million times. It raises a lot of questions in my mind that's all I'm saying. Either way i'm using tungsten when possible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a solid. You aren't going to get poisoned handling it. Start melting it or grinding it to dust, and inhaling the fumes and dust, or eating it and letting you digestive juices work on it, that's a different story.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jfrancho I never knew lead had an inert state. I always just figured lead was lead. If what you say is true (and I have no reason to doubt) why all the hype about it? Everything thing with lead says this product is known to the state of blah blah we've all seen it a million times. It raises a lot of questions in my mind that's all I'm saying. Either way i'm using tungsten when possible.

You can thank california for that. Their proposition warning labels cause more harm than the item it's put on

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only advantage a tungsten offers for a punch weight is smaller size compared to lead or brass. Brass is hard and gives you the same bottom feed back as tungsten, is larger in size and less expensive. If you can fish lead where you are, then lead is a good choice; heavy and the least expensive weight.

The only punch weight worth the extra money is Miller's brass punch weight. Otherwise use Top Brass painted weight and peg them for punching.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be that tungsten weights are the best invention since the zipper, but I'm not gonna pony up $3 per sinker when I can get 25 lead weights for about the same money.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use both but I prefer the tungsten just for the smaller profile. I just wish they were a lot cheaper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a solid. You aren't going to get poisoned handling it. Start melting it or grinding it to dust, and inhaling the fumes and dust, or eating it and letting you digestive juices work on it, that's a different story.

Hey John, as someone that used to have a blood lead level of 47 micrograms/deciliter (lead poisoning level), let me just add to that a bit.

After handling lead, it's always a good idea to wash your hands before eating, drinking, smoking, or otherwise getting your hands near your mouth. Now, if you only handle a lead weight a couple times a day while tying up a Texas rig, you will probably die of old age before feeling any effects from lead poisoning. If you are sorting out a bunch of lead sinkers and have handled quite a few - for your health and safety you should be washing your hands. There is indeed the potential to transfer lead into your system while handling the solid form. The effects are minimal, but can be cumulative, depending on frequency of exposure. Handle enough lead, enough times, and you run the risk of gradually increasing your blood lead level.

As John said, if you are casting your own weights, jig heads, etc., you MUST take precautions to prevent excessive lead exposure - gloves, cross ventilation across your furnace, thorough washing of your hands and face after a casting session (and a shower is good idea as well), washing the clothes worn during casting, etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing forum

    fishing

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing forum

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×