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Cody0707

Strictly Spinning Reel Users

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How many of you have tried a baitcast setup and just did not find it enjoyable enough to change from your spinning reels? Were you able to get it down with very few birdsnest or did you get fed up with it while trying to learn? Any other reason for staying with a spinning reel?

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It did not take me that long to get used to. Read the article at the top of the forum on how to set up your baitcaster, it makes a difference, especially at first.

When I got my first baitcaster I tied a washer onto it and threw it in the yard for a few hours. You will get good at sorting backlashes ;)

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i would bet all my setups, that learning baitcasting will make fishing easier, for some applications. i remember trying to use my spinning rod for cranks and spinnerbaits, my 33 for buzzes and frogs.. so glad.. sorry to OP that these answers arent what ya seek, but i beleive most hardcore bassmen at some point have given in and are using baitcast gear

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I have 7 baitcast and 6 spinning outfits and soon to be 7 spinning outfits in another week. I fish from the shore mainly and with obstacles on the shore using a spinning setup was more practical but I did want to learn to use a baitcast setup so I added them later. I fish from the shore still and also fish tournaments not and I take a baitcaster out with me each time I go but my main rods are still my spinning rods. Practice with them is a must if you plan to be good with them but so far my spinning rods have handled everything I fish. I've learned to flip and pitch with my casting reels but also do it with my spinning reels as well. I still get the occasional "backlash" but I keep a pick with me and have learned how to get them out also. The fish in my avatar at the time was a PB at 4.5 close to 5lbs and caught her in the slop on a frog with 6 lb Cajun Red Mono on a 6'6" MH/F Cabelas XML with a Quantum Kinetic. I have spinning rods that range from Med to Heavy with one spool with either a co polymer or flouro on it and the other spool with 30 - 50lbs braid.

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I have both, however that doesn´t mean I always fish with both, if for whatever reason, I have to choose one over the other I´ll choose spinning without thinking too much, so, do you absolutely "need" a baitcaster ? ---> absolutely not.

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I've had one baitcaster but I sold it 20 years ago and have used spinning only since then. I didn't have any trouble using it, but it wasn't versatile enough for the things I wanted to do. I'm not a technique-specific angler and spinning fills my general-purpose needs better.

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Exactly what Marty said. I do use a baitcaster some for heavy-duty applications, but I'm 90% spinning.

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You want my opinion..................you got it.

I own only 1 b/c, as the name implies I use it for fishing with bait, live or cut and it's only for species I think may run over 50#, I have spinning gear that will handle those same 50# fish (and it's a lot more fun for me too).

I do see the point of using a b/c with 65# line for tournament fishing, the object is to drag a fish in fast, for the most part those fish aren't too big and offer little or no fight. To me that isn't fishing, that's trying to cash a check. The times I need a bit heavier set up to pull fish out of heavy cover, I use a mh spinning rod and 20# braid. I've yet to catch the freshwater fish I can't handle on that set up, excluding only a sturgeon and one of the those big Texas gars, which I've never caught, bet a 18000 stella would handle one of them, lol.

Growing up in Michigan in the 50's I was weened on b/c gear, I have no problem casting them, unless the new modern ones are more difficult, be my guess they would be easier today. It didn't take long to convert to strictly using spinning and fly rods, IMO the fun and challenge increased many times. I truly believe that b/c fishermen are missing some great action and taking the easy way out, just my opinion. This isn't a knock or a condensing comment, but look at the PB of most members, not too many PB's over 10#, just the nature of the areas that are fished. I want that 10# bass on a spinning rod, if I lose it so what, not one lands them all.

In all fairness I believe bass fishermen have been programmed in thinking that a using b/c, heavy lines, having 3-5 or 10 rods with them is essential to be successful, I think that's pure non sense for the recreational fisherman.

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I find the line twist and tip wraps using spinning gear more of a hassle than the rare birdsnest in my casting reels. Its the fish that dictate what I use. I'll always prefer to use casting gear, but as local water become more pressured I have to use lighter/smaller lures to find success. So spinning reels get more and more use.

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You want my opinion..................you got it.

I own only 1 b/c, as the name implies I use it for fishing with bait, live or cut and it's only for species I think may run over 50#, I have spinning gear that will handle those same 50# fish (and it's a lot more fun for me too).

I do see the point of using a b/c with 65# line for tournament fishing, the object is to drag a fish in fast, for the most part those fish aren't too big and offer little or no fight. To me that isn't fishing, that's trying to cash a check. The times I need a bit heavier set up to pull fish out of heavy cover, I use a mh spinning rod and 20# braid. I've yet to catch the freshwater fish I can't handle on that set up, excluding only a sturgeon and one of the those big Texas gars, which I've never caught, bet a 18000 stella would handle one of them, lol.

Growing up in Michigan in the 50's I was weened on b/c gear, I have no problem casting them, unless the new modern ones are more difficult, be my guess they would be easier today. It didn't take long to convert to strictly using spinning and fly rods, IMO the fun and challenge increased many times. I truly believe that b/c fishermen are missing some great action and taking the easy way out, just my opinion. This isn't a knock or a condensing comment, but look at the PB of most members, not too many PB's over 10#, just the nature of the areas that are fished. I want that 10# bass on a spinning rod, if I lose it so what, not one lands them all.

In all fairness I believe bass fishermen have been programmed in thinking that a using b/c, heavy lines, having 3-5 or 10 rods with them is essential to be successful, I think that's pure non sense for the recreational fisherman.

I really think it's a matter of personal preference. My main point was that if you don't learn to use a baitcaster because it's too frustrating you may be selling yourself short. Something being difficult isn't a reason to give up on it.

But as far as pros ripping fish out of the water to cash a check I very much disagree. I find it a bit unsporting to intentionally 'play' the fish out to exhaustion and then release him all worn out to go catch his next meal. I can't think of another outdoor sport where this is done. You don't wound a deer so that you get the pleasure of tracking it until it collapses. I know it's all in fun and to each his own, but I always figured the point was to catch the fish, not to fight it. I want to get the fish in the boat and back in some water as quickly as possible so I can go after the next one.

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I got my first round reel in 2001. It's an Abu Garcia 5501C3. I would bring it with me as back-up on various fishing trips, but it saw very little use behind my spinning reels. I wanted to learn how to use it, but most trips ended with me cutting out the worlds largest birds nest followed by me swearing I'd never use it again as it was thrown into the truck for the remainder of the trip.

All told, I'll bet I took the reel on four trips in ten years, and I might have made two successful casts the whole time with zero fish. Fast forward to last year when I started reading this forum. I decided to make a commitment to learn how to use this casting reel. I had a one ounce drop weight that I tied on and began to drive my wife crazy with my attempts in the yard. I finally was able to cast it, just not very far. I had the brake set very tight in fear of the backlash.

I finally got the confidence to try it out on the water. I didn't have any backlashes, but I was frustrated with the lack of distance. I think I even posted a question here about it. I thought something was wrong with the reel. So I would continue to bring the reel and use it sparingly. I finally figured out that if I lighten up on the brake and throw my heavier lures, the reel was great. Then I bought a 51e. That reel was a game-changer for me.

Long winded way of getting to my point, but I still go to spinning gear when I want to throw TX rigged light plastics. Other than that, it took ten years, but I have become very comfortable with the simplicity and control I feel I have with casting reels.

If you want to learn, get some heavy pound test and a one ounce weight and start practicing. Hit the water, but use the casting gear in small increments, one day you will look back in disbelief that you ever had trouble. Good luck.

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@ Busy,

If most people used nothing but a b/c, in a reasonable amount time they would become proficient enough to use it comfortably, it isn't that hard.

In 60 years of fishing and catching more than just a few fish of all species I could count the times on my fingers and toes that I'm aware of beating one to pure exhaustion, on a percentage basis that hardly computes. Even a fish dragged in quickly is probably not returned to the water without some fatigue, still prone to a predator attack. I would agree some species of fish are not as hardy as others and do have higher mortality rates, I no longer fish for those species and never would again. That said those species have a smaller population to begin with and unless targeting them, they are going to be a much rarer catch. If it were to happen, believe me I'm going to land it, not an ounce of doubt in my mind about that.

If someone chooses to drag a 2 or 3# fish in and land it in 30 seconds or less and wants to call it sporting, so be it, that isn't for me. What I call sporting is giving the fish a chance to win, I'm already using hi tech rods and reels, and lines with incredible strength.

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There are times of the year ( spring/fall) where im strictly walleye fishing and use spinning rods 99% of the time. Aside from that i use baitcasting gear the rest of the year for bass. I personally prefer casting with a casting reel much more for the majority of applications. I just love the way it feels casting and retrieving. That in turn has made me more proficient with accuracy and working baits correctly. Not to say uoucamt with spinning gear, i just enjoy casting gear and have more confidence with it.

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I think if you take time to learn to use a level-wind you'll be glad you did.

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I use strictly spinning cuz that is what I was taught on. I am wanting to get a bait caster and try it but don't exactly have the funds to throw that way right now. But like Sir Snook and Marty said you can do darn near anything with a spinning setup and 10 pound mono or 20 pound braid will haul u in almost any fish. I fish 99% of the time from shore and u get it done, flip pitch side arm or throw the bait out. Lol

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You can definitely do about anything but as a personal preference most using baitcasters is much more enjoyable to me.

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I can tighten a bolt with an open end wrench all the time, I can use a socket on a ratchet most of the time, If I do I am much much more EFFICIENT, that translates into being more productive. There are times you need the open end wrench and it will work better than the wrachet. It is the same with a spinning reel and a baitcast reel. If you don't learn to use both you can fish for anything, any way you want, with either one you want. But that doesn't mean you can be as productive as knowing when and how to use both. The fact is they are both better than the other at different techniques, learn how to use both and what they excel at, and you will be a much more productive fisherman, it's that simple!

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I have a couple of med spinning combos that go with me most of the time. For light line/baits they are indispensible to me. I always have one unless I have limited time on a small lake with decent fish, and know I won't need one. I enjoy baitcast gear better for most bass fishing, although I prefer med power rods for most techniques. I also am one of the guys that SirSnook mentions who wants several combos at hand while fishing. I could easily get by with RW's recommended three rigs or with only one, but why would I want to? I enjoy being able to throw a jig, or a wacky rigged Senko, or a square biil, or a buzzbait, or a beaver, or a shakyhead, or a spinnerbait, or a C-rig... without having to spend time re-rigging on a rod maybe not really suited for the purpose. I am a recreational fisherman. I fish for my enjoyment and having several rods at hand (spinning and baitcast) to allow me a variety of presentaions at a single target or simply ready if I want one, makes me happy. It isn't any more complex than that. I don't care that Ike has 20 rods on deck, or that Ish considers my spinning gear "fairy wands".

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I have a couple of med spinning combos that go with me most of the time. For light line/baits they are indispensible to me. I always have one unless I have limited time on a small lake with decent fish, and know I won't need one. I enjoy baitcast gear better for most bass fishing, although I prefer med power rods for most techniques. I also am one of the guys that SirSnook mentions who wants several combos at hand while fishing. I could easily get by with RW's recommended three rigs or with only one, but why would I want to? I enjoy being able to throw a jig, or a wacky rigged Senko, or a square biil, or a buzzbait, or a beaver, or a shakyhead, or a spinnerbait, or a C-rig... without having to spend time re-rigging on a rod maybe not really suited for the purpose. I am a recreational fisherman. I fish for my enjoyment and having several rods at hand (spinning and baitcast) to allow me a variety of presentaions at a single target or simply ready if I want one, makes me happy. It isn't any more complex than that. I don't care that Ike has 20 rods on deck, or that Ish considers my spinning gear "fairy wands".

X2 Well said. I don't get to spend much time on the water. I'll take 4-5 rods with me when in my SMALL boat, but have more in the car if I want them. Usually one or 2 are spinning rods and the rest b/c. Lures are already tied on. I seldom change a lure once fishing even tho I probably should at times. Instead I switch rods. Each rod is set up for a different technique.

I don't have 20 rods to put on deck, but getting close. :):eyebrows:

What I really need is a boat that would handle 20 rods. :) :)

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