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Pitching And Flipping From A Canoe

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I fish in a canoe and it seems like i run into a lot of situations where pitching a lure would be very helpful. The problem is that I'm not an acrobat and standing isn't really a safe option.  Does anybody have any techniques or tips that might work for pitching from a sitting position?

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What if you put the chair on top of a step stool in the canoe? J/K, I have no idea what to do other than to stand up.

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I did alot of fishing from a canoe when i started seriously bass fishing an all i can say from my experiences is it was pretty awkward in a canoe. Sitting down probably just makes it alot tougher.

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Maybe you can try skipping the bait into cover, you may have to angle you canoe so that your right hand is able to side arm the roll cast the to the target and skip it in to the cover. I have to do that when I do pond fish.

My pond boat is not stable enough for to stand up either.

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Dee Thomas, the man who introduced flipping to pro bass fishing fished out of a 14' aluminum V hull boat and flipped setting down on a 2 X 6 attached to the gunnel! So much for conventional wisdom that you need to stand on the front of a carpeted bass boat to be successful at flipping or pitching. Dee still sits In a front pedestal seat in his bass boat and catches a lot bass.

In a canoe you are lower in the water, but I think you could make a seat that attaches to the gunnel similar to Dee's old tin boat.

You could learn the loop cast like Hank Parker often uses on his TV programs; that is the casting technique I use most of the time when I want to keep the lure near the water surface and make shorter accurate casts.

Tom

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I use my spinning rod to flip/pitch with when sitting in my kayak.

Basically you open the bail, release enough line to have the bait swing about reel level while holding the line with your reel hand. You then pendulum the bait towards the target and releas the line with your reel hand and feather the spool as it reaches the target.

Way harder to explain than to do.....I'll see if I can make up a video this weekend when I go out.

I obviously don't use this with super heavy gear but it works great to throw baits in brush and other tight spots where you can't skip a bait or use a traditional casting technique.

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I used to do it sitting down in my old 2 man. You can either go with a shorter rod or learn to be really accurate with a sidearm roll cast. I got really good at a roll cast and skipping with a baitcaster from fishing in that little boat. Eventually I learned to stand in the boat without falling out but I know that's not really an option in a canoe.

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Canoe outriggers seem to be polarizing - some anglers that fish from canoes won't leave home without them...some folks hate them and consider them unwieldy and obtrusive.  I guess it just depends on what your vision is for your canoe: 1) a trim watercraft to get into tight places with minimum bulk and complexity, or 2) a stable casting platform and bass boat substitute.

 

They're not for everone, however, they DO let me stand the whole time I'm on the water. OTOH - they can be a PITA if you're paddling - they have to be mounted well forward, or well aft - may or not be a problem depending on the length of the canoe.  They are no problem when motoring.

 

If outriggers aren't for you - I think flyfisher had a great sugestion about the use of spinning gear. In addition to skipping, I also pitch with a spinning rod and have flipped with a spinning rod when I've got my canoe under a tree canopy or at the end of a creek channel with overhanging bushes and such. One of these days I might buy a short spinning rod (5' - 5 1/2') just for this purpose...

 

gallery_25379_89_198123.jpg

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I also do what flyfisher suggested by using a spinng rod, but I can do it with my baitcasting rigs as well. I'll add one more tip to help hone your skill - find a cooler or old 5 gallon bucket. Sit on it and practice your technique. Sitting in this manner will put you close to the same seating position you would be in your canoe. Also keep in mind that pitching and flipping are not considered techniques for long casts. Being in a kayak or canoe allows you to obtain a location advantage in certain situations compared to a traditional boat by permitting you to get closer and in shallower water making the need for a long flip or pitch irrelevant. The biggest challenge in a canoe is learning that sound kills, so remain as quiet as possible by not paddling into the spot - drift instead. All this is for naught if you don't practice the technique before heading out on the water.

Keep us posted on your progress.

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I fish out of an Old Town Predator square back canoe.

 

Here are a few factors that come into play when Flipping / Pitching from a canoe (or most manually propelled water craft):

 

~ Doing this from a seated position takes practice.  Standing is better for many reasons but only a small percentage of canoes / kayaks are built / designed to do it safely.

 

~  I am using is technique when targeting fish in some of the heaviest & nastiest cover.

   The heavy gear is required to hook and immediately move the fish from where it is and to get it to where you are - Fast.  When setting the hook and fighting a fish in this manner and with this gear, first time canoe flippers will soon learn that many times instead of hauling the fish to you - you'll end up moving toward the fish.  Even when you're ready for it, this causes a few problems right away.  Initially, you don't get the kind of hook set you'd get when fishing from a higher and heavier craft.  Second, you might not be able to move the fish much right away so there could be some "noodling" involved in order to actually land said bass.  And finally, if and when you swing & miss a hook-up completely - you might go for a dip.

 

~ I have never tried it - but two anglers flipping from one canoe would seem to complicate things quite a bit.

 

~ Wind makes this technique harder. If you can anchor (quietly) that will help a little.

 

All that being said - Flipping from a manually propelled craft can still be done and quite effectively.  It will take a lot of practice and there may be a few hard lessons learned in the process. 

 

As mentioned above, the obvious maneuverability advantages of these smaller vessels certainly come into play for both presentation and landing bass with this method.

 

As a side note - much of this comes into play when throwing a frog sytle bait on the slop as well.

 

Is it spring yet ?

 

A-Jay

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Canoe outriggers seem to be polarizing - some anglers that fish from canoes won't leave home without them...some folks hate them and consider them unwieldy and obtrusive.  I guess it just depends on what your vision is for your canoe: 1) a trim watercraft to get into tight places with minimum bulk and complexity, or 2) a stable casting platform and bass boat substitute. They're not for everone, however, they DO let me stand the whole time I'm on the water. OTOH - they can be a PITA if you're paddling - they have to be mounted well forward, or well aft - may or not be a problem depending on the length of the canoe.  They are no problem when motoring. If outriggers aren't for you - I think flyfisher had a great sugestion about the use of spinning gear. In addition to skipping, I also pitch with a spinning rod and have flipped with a spinning rod when I've got my canoe under a tree canopy or at the end of a creek channel with overhanging bushes and such. One of these days I might buy a short spinning rod (5' - 5 1/2') just for this purpose... [img=http://www.bassresource.com/bass-fishing-forums/uploads/gallery/album_89/gallery_25379_89_198123.jpg]
what a rig! If you don't mind me asking, how much did that all cost?

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When I had my little pond boat I learned how to pitch sitting down.  More like a gentle side arm cast as opposed to stand up pitching.  It can be done.  It takes practice.  Bring several  pre-spooled reels.  You will get some bird nests while you are learning.

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what a rig! If you don't mind me asking, how much did that all cost?

 

Dunno, never really added it all up. I'd guess about $2500 to $2700 or so.  Everything was new - canoe $1000, HB 798 $800, MK Traxxis TM $320, battery box/battery/wiring/connectors $150 or so. Then add the outriggers $225, and all the bits and pieces. It adds up....

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I hadn't thought of the out rigger's and it seems like a great idea.  The main lake that i fish is a super heavy milfoil lake so it's gonna take some thought to make them work without causing more drag than it's worth.  It sounds like a good project to figure out over the winter.  Meanwhile i'll be practicing from a 5 gallon bucket in the living room.  Thanks for all of the ideas.  I've tried pitching with spinning reels and it feels really awkward but I've never tried with a really heavy (>1/2 oz) weight so I think that might be a part of my struggles.  I also haven't been able to find info on you tube on roll skipping and it sounds like that might be my best plan of attack...Anybody have a link they can post to point me in the right direction?

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I hadn't thought of the out rigger's and it seems like a great idea.  The main lake that i fish is a super heavy milfoil lake so it's gonna take some thought to make them work without causing more drag than it's worth.  .............

 

 

The outriggers are to provide secondary stability.  You set the floats so that they are off the water when you have the boat moving and trimmed on the roll axis so there's no drag from the floats.  When you stop to fish and stand up, you can lean a bit one way or the other to have one of the floats contact the water and then you're pretty solid on stability.
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I think you'd be well-served to try using a shorter rod. Even when standing (if you can figure out how to do that safely) you still won't be very high off the water. I fish off a decked out jon and I'm even considering trying out a 6.5 or 7ft for some applications...mainly tight quarters or places where I need to make more accurate pitches. The shorter rod allows me to make a better motion with my arm without letting the bait hit the water.

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If pitching or flipping from a sit-on-top kayak while seated is possible, then pitching from a canoe should be a breeze.

 

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Canoe outriggers seem to be polarizing - some anglers that fish from canoes won't leave home without them...some folks hate them and consider them unwieldy and obtrusive.  I guess it just depends on what your vision is for your canoe: 1) a trim watercraft to get into tight places with minimum bulk and complexity, or 2) a stable casting platform and bass boat substitute.

 

They're not for everone, however, they DO let me stand the whole time I'm on the water. OTOH - they can be a PITA if you're paddling - they have to be mounted well forward, or well aft - may or not be a problem depending on the length of the canoe.  They are no problem when motoring.

 

If outriggers aren't for you - I think flyfisher had a great sugestion about the use of spinning gear. In addition to skipping, I also pitch with a spinning rod and have flipped with a spinning rod when I've got my canoe under a tree canopy or at the end of a creek channel with overhanging bushes and such. One of these days I might buy a short spinning rod (5' - 5 1/2') just for this purpose...

 

gallery_25379_89_198123.jpg

 

I have a similar set up (same stabilizers) and am 6'5" 270.  I have launched big swimbaits and flipped/pitched out of my 14' canoe with no issues (knock on wood).  Often I am doing it while there's another person in the canoe too.  Unless your body/mobility is compromised, these should work just fine.

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 If pitching or flipping from a sit-on-top kayak while seated is possible, then pitching from a canoe should be a breeze.

 

 

That guy did a great job explaining it, I understood everything.  :wink2:

 

Obviously I couldn't understand a word he was saying and I don't think he was necessarily trying to explain his casting technique, but it was very cool to see him doing it from his yak. 

 

What I took away from the video is it can be done (I fish from a canoe, sitting position) and perhaps the best way to practice inside the house this winter would be to sit on a milk crate and just keep practicing.  The milk crate is about the same height off the floor as the canoe seat is off the water. 

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great idea about practicing sitting on the floor. i learned pitching in my grandpas pool. pick a spot and throw. it will come 

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link fixed 1/11/13

This should help

not exactly what you're asking for but helpful

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Well I have a new response to this topic. I am currently up in Lakeland Fl, and am fishing from a canoe out on a private lake. Not just me, but my wifes uncle too. The canoe is about 10ft. We both are standing on the canoe and are pitching jigs at times. Its a balancing act, but we got it down, lol.

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