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I found a spool of 65 pound braid, I have never fished braid and I definatley want to try it. Should this be used for topwater froggin', saltwater fishing, etc?

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65# braid is the choice by many for frogging. That's what I would use it for. It works very well for that application

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heavy cover garbage fishin; froggin, flippin, punchin etc...

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I'd start off using mono until you get the hang of it. Braid is more difficult to fix if you backlash. Once you can cast with the mono move on to the braid.

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heavy cover garbage fishin; froggin, flippin, punchin etc...

 

x2, rig in on a baitcaster and fish the nastiest cover you can find. 

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65 lb. is perfect for frog fishing! I would put it on a bait caster! If you have a good bait caster the drags on them are better for froggin than a spinning reel.

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I also use 65 lb. on a C-rig for deep water bass.

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Heavy grass, frog fishing, or C rig on a baitcaster.

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Next to 50lb. braid, 65lb braid is probably one of the most useful sizes when it comes to fishing both fresh and salt. I have a Abu Garcia Record 60HC spooled with it. The entire 300yd spool fit on the reel. I use it for big salt and fresh water fish. Everything from land locked stripers and whisker-kitties (ie: big flathead, blue and channel cats) to salty species like bull reds, monster stripers (40"+), togs, sheepsheads and black drum.

I also have a Shimano Curado 200 DSV spooled with it and use it as my froggin and heavy jig setup. I can cast a Stanley Ribbit close to 40 yards with it, but I can also use it for fishing heavy jig-n-craws and nasty cover.

Find yourself a good used Citica or Curado (silver ones) and pair it up with a good 6'6" - 7'6" MH/XF rod and don't look back.

As far as reel type, in order to use 65lb braid on a spinning reel effectively, you are most likely looking at either a surf casting rig or heavy boat rig with a 5000 series reel or higher. Most folks in the Chesapeake Bay that fish out of a boat use a Shimano Saros, Stellas and Baitrunners or Daiwa Saltigas in the 8000 class for line that heavy.

In a kayak, I have the luxury of allowing the kayak to act as a form of drag, so I don't need as large of a reel or line for that matter when it comes to spinning gear. The largest series spinning reel I own is a Stradic FJ3000 spooled with 30lb. PP and I use it for reds, speckled trout, striper, bass, etc.....

For everyday fishing, 30lb PP is the most you need. If the cover is not too thick or gnarly, then you can actually get away with 20lb, even for froggin.

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Most of my fishing is saltwater and the max size braid I use is 30# for offshore, my inshore gear gets 15 & 20# braid, my reels go from 2000-8000 size.  For me 30# is as heavy as I care to use.  That said, there are no rules in fishing, use what you like.

Freshwater I use 10 & 15 braid, nothing but spinning gear.

I use 65# braid to tie up my buganvilla plants in moss green, blends in perfectly with the leaves.

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The 14# mono equivalent diameter of 65# braid makes for an easy transition on casting gear, if you've never used braid before.  It's overkill as far as actual breaking strength, but it's very forgiving when it comes to line management and knot tying.  I like 65# for punching, frogging, and big jigs.

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Don't forget to use mono as a backer, you can not fill any reel completely with just braid. The reason is that braid slips and must have a backer for the drag to work properly.

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I'd start off using mono until you get the hang of it. Braid is more difficult to fix if you backlash. Once you can cast with the mono move on to the braid.

 

I find the exact opposite to be true. Additionally, braid has zero memory.

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I use 65# braid to tie up my buganvilla plants in moss green, blends in perfectly with the leaves.

 

 

I knew there was a reason I don't have any 65# braid yet.  :teeth:

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My tackle shop uses it to hold up signs and hang things, just another use for 65lb braid.

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Im planning to use some to sow the crotch in my hunting bibs, regular thread just doesnt hold up. Great for tying jigs too.

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Don't forget to use mono as a backer, you can not fill any reel completely with just braid. The reason is that braid slips and must have a backer for the drag to work properly.

That is provided you do not have a "drilled out spool".....All my spools are drilled hence no problem. If you do fill your spool completely remember you can just reverse the braid when it is time to change it. 

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#65lb is a MUST for flipping/punching.   Not that you necessarily need 65lb tensile strength on a 5lb fish....but it does two things.  1.) gives you margin against breakage for when your line gets knicked up (and it will).  2.) the larger diameter of the #65 keeps the punch stops in place much better than the smaller diameter braids.  It's a royal pain to be sliding that punch stop down to the weight all day long.

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Don't forget to use mono as a backer, you can not fill any reel completely with just braid. The reason is that braid slips and must have a backer for the drag to work properly.

A layer of electrical or masking tape, which I use, around the arbor then tie or tape over that and you will not have any slippage at all.  I have no backing on about spinning reels, all straight braid.  Newer braid ready spining reels have a strip of rubbber on which to tie on, or a elastic ring to put the line underneath and hold it in place.

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That is provided you do not have a "drilled out spool".....All my spools are drilled hence no problem. If you do fill your spool completely remember you can just reverse the braid when it is time to change it. 

 

 

Umm not completely sure, many ppl who have drilled out spools just run the mono  through one of the little holes and spool it up.  The drag works because the mono builds up friction and the drag slips without any force ever being applied to the end of the line where it is just held by tension. The braid will slip against its self and will slip long before the force ever gets to the knot holding the line to the spool, there have been several post about this in the past. I can not say with absolute certainty as I always put on mono backing. And I'm sure it depends how tight you have your drag set.

 

from the power pro website concerning baitcasting reels

 

PowerPro Braided Line.

Spooling your Reel

All braided lines need to be spooled in a specific manner. Because of PowerPro's incredibly thin diameter and limited stretch, it is very important that your PowerPro line is packed tightly on your reel. When a braided line is first put onto your reel, ideally you should place a small piece of arbor tape (or electrical tape) onto the spool itself. The tape prevents the spool from slipping underneath your line. (TIP: If you do not use a few wraps of monofilament or tape as backing, the PowerPro will actually slip on the spool giving you the illusion that the reel has no drag.) Once the tape is in place, wrap your PowerPro around the spool 2-4 times. Next tie a "uni" knot and tighten around the spool. When braided line is being wound onto the reel, be sure to add pressure to your spool of PowerPro to guarantee that the line is being packed tightly. Once you are finished spooling up your reel, use your thumb to press down on the line on your spool. If it feels soft, you may need to re-spool your line and apply more pressure. However, if you press down and the line feels hard, then your line is packed tightly on the spool and you are ready to go fishing!

 

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