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Should I Always Target This Certain Spot

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here is my question:  If let say i catch a good bass along a certain sea wall, and if i come back to that spot, should i try and catch that fish again, or was this a one time deal? also another question is: should i try and catch more fish there(bass), or will there be just one. from my experience(which isn't alot) that is the only fish that i'm catching there. 

 

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If there is one , there may be more , the best you can start with is not to release the fish right away , if you have a boat , put it in your live well , chances are not all that great that you will catch that same fish , not saying it's not possible because it does happen , but if you catch one , it may turn on a whole school , so yes , keep fishing the spot , move on when it slows , if it was productive , come back on a later time and see what happens !!

Good luck and be safe !!!

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Whenever I catch a nice bass I always target that spot next time I'm there with the same lure but sometimes it calls for something else.

An example of this my buddy few days ago missed a nice bass in the same spot he caught this one today 4lbs 6oz. He was using a frog and wasn't paying attention the bass slurped it and he didn't get a chance to set the hook but felt her. Then today he was in the same spot castes a pop'r over there and on the second twitch she exploded on it. Then same thing few days ago he missed one on a crank, I think it was, felt her hit and fight then she came unhooked. He moved around and went back to the same spot again like 30mins later but this time he had a wacky rigged Senko an caught her. He said she hit and fought the same so he figured it was the same fish.

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Radio-tracking studies repeatedly show that largemouth bass are highly residential fish that stay put.

With respect to 'good' fish, always save the coordinates where one is landed,

because those are the spots most likely to provide a repeat performance.

Even if you took a big bass home, that would create a vacuum that would eventually be filled

by another good fish. In the law of nature, 'might makes right', and the biggest bass lay claim to the best sweet spots.

 

Roger

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When Im not out in fishing with friends and take mt canoe out, I have to fish much slower; which has actually worked to my benefit.  It forced me to fish much slower and at the same time build confidence catching fish behind people.   Anchored up, I have made multiple casts, sometimes around 20 to one area before even catching one fish, usually I can pick off a few more.  If you are fishing a textbook area,  as mentioned a sea wall, a stump near deep water etc etc have confidence fish are there; usually they are, try different lures and angles are extremely important.  If you feel you have fished an area thoroughly, let it rest and come back later.

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Roger is absolutely right, as usual. Most of us have spots that we know will produce fish most of the time, and other spots that will produce good fish at particular times. It takes time and experience to learn those locations, and more importantly, to learn why they produce. It is learning the "why" that separates the good fishermen from all the rest...good luck. 

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Not only do i target the same spot i also then use the details of that same spot to find other spots like it on the same body of water and usually they produce as well.

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thanks for the replies guys, another question i have fishing sea walls, should i fish  parallel to it , or throw straight at it ?

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Roger is absolutely right, as usual. Most of us have spots that we know will produce fish most of the time, and other spots that will produce good fish at particular times. It takes time and experience to learn those locations, and more importantly, to learn why they produce. It is learning the "why" that separates the good fishermen from all the rest...good luck. 

 

This ^

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On my lake there is one spot I always go to (if it is not already taken) I usually fish it for 45 mins then move on. In those 45 mins I catch anywhere from 7-12 fish from 2 1/2 - 4 lbers. The bad part is that everyone on the lake knows the area and we fight over the sport. A lipless crank with a stop and go retrieve would put so much fish in your boat it is truly unbelievable.

P.S. It has been this way for about three years now.

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Roger is absolutely right, as usual. Most of us have spots that we know will produce fish most of the time, and other spots that will produce good fish at particular times. It takes time and experience to learn those locations, and more importantly, to learn why they produce. It is learning the "why" that separates the good fishermen from all the rest...good luck. 

X2 ~

 

It's the "Why" that my allow us to reproduce the results on other areas of the same and perhaps different bodies of water.

 

A-Jay

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I wouldn't sit on that spot 24/7, but I would make a note of the times and baits you were using when you caught bass there.

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thanks for the replies guys, another question i have fishing sea walls, should i fish  parallel to it , or throw straight at it ?

 

There is no either/or answer to this question. It depends on the fish!   :eyebrows:  How fish relate to structure/cover and respond to different baits depends on many things; time of year, water temps, weather conditions, water condition and time of day, to name only a few. That is all part of the "why" and there are no simple answers IMO.

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It really depends on the lake and the time of year as to how much they will move.

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thanks for the replies guys, another question i have fishing sea walls, should i fish  parallel to it , or throw straight at it ?

 

There is no either/or answer to this question. It depends on the fish!   :eyebrows:  How fish relate to structure/cover and respond to different baits depends on many things; time of year, water temps, weather conditions, water condition and time of day, to name only a few. That is all part of the "why" and there are no simple answers IMO.

 

X2 , I will always attack a structure as this parallel first , as K_Mac stated though , it is going to be up to the fish and what they want , and how they want it , stay open minded .

 

Good luck and be safe !!!

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The more you learn about the bass behavior in the lakes you fish often, the more good spots will be available.

Two reasons bass will be actively feeding, therefor catchable are; 1. Abundant food supply and 2. Sanctuary or safe heaven nearby.

Prey source and safe resting area or sanctuary differs with each lake classification/location. When they prey source tends to be primarily dermasil or prey that lives close to shore, the bass relate to shoreline locations.

Lakes that have a combination of both dermasil and pelagic prey sources, the bass tend to be both near and off shore locations.

The feeding zones or spots where you catch bass therefore depend on the prey types and the specie of bass.

When you find a specific location you gaurd it's location when possible and fish there often. No spot stays secret for long, so take advantage when the bass are there.

Tom

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Location Optimization. In Bass Fishing an angler needs to understand the values of the different variables that go into making a "sweet spot" as Rolo mentioned, a preferred area for bass to be. The reason for this Apex predator to take up residence in a certain locale usually revolves around food, safety, and comfort.

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I believe Rolo is spot on.  I have fish residing in several places I fish, one if fact has a noticeable spot on it's lip and I've caught quite a few times within 20 or 30' of the same place.  Do I catch them every time I fish there, of course not.

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thanks for the replies guys, another question i have fishing sea walls, should i fish parallel to it , or throw straight at it ?

Depends on your technique/lure. If I'm flipping a wall it's pretty much straight at it, if casting crankbaits, or moving reaction baits then it's parallel.

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Ambush predators like a bass and what many call saltwater bass (snook) so often are caught along side seawalls.  I'd say pretty close to 90% of my seawall fish are caught no more than 12" out from the wall, I always cast parallel.  The fish lurk in the shadow and wait for bait at the edge of ambient shadow light line, if you're fishing at night.  IMO nothing is more productive than dirty water, I started the new year off right with a great snook yesterday fishing this exact scenario.

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I believe Rolo is spot on.  I have fish residing in several places I fish, one if fact has a noticeable spot on it's lip and I've caught quite a few times within 20 or 30' of the same place.  Do I catch them every time I fish there, of course not.

Got to add to this.

Not only do I feel they reside in a fairly small area but when I catch really nice one I 'm catching other good fish in their respective areas.  Seems when the small fish are on that's pretty much what I get and when the bigger ones are aggressive I don't catch too many small ones. 

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here is my question:  If let say i catch a good bass along a certain sea wall, and if i come back to that spot, should i try and catch that fish again, or was this a one time deal? also another question is: should i try and catch more fish there(bass), or will there be just one. from my experience(which isn't alot) that is the only fish that i'm catching there. 

 

All I can say is this:

 

There is a lake that I have fished several times per year for probably going on 8 or 9 years. One of my first trips out there I found an old stack of wooden pallets (skids) that someone had nailed together and submerged just a couple of feet below the surface. If you didn't know they were there you would probably never notice them. However since I know they are there, I can put my Wiley X sunglasses on and look at the area and see the dark area in the water from a mile away.

 

I do not know if there has been a single time since I found that pallet stack that I have fished the lake and not caught at least a couple of fish off of these pallets.

 

This summer I took a guy fishing that isn't what I would call super skilled in the art of catching bass. He watched me catch about a dozen fish and he had little more than a nibble from a bluegill. So I cruised down to where the pallet stack is (which is out away from the bank) and as I was casting to the shoreline I told him to whacky rig a 5" Gary Yamamoto Senko and it doesn't matter what color as long as it is dark. The guy looked at me funny and I said "I am serious." So he reluctantly ties on a Senko.

 

I said do you see out there where the water looks a little different color than the water around it, cast right there and let the Senko fall on slack line for about 3 seconds and then engage your reel. Again he looks at me funny and again I tell him that I am serious.

 

So he casts exactly where I told him, lets his Senko drop for 3 seconds, engages his reel and BAM he catches a bass.

 

He looks over at me and says "Are you freaking (language cleaned up for the kids) kidding me?"

 

I just laughed and said "that's how I roll."

 

 

 

So the answer to your question is Yes. You should hit that same area again.

 

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The one experience that I've had that sticks out is I was fishing the Illinois River a few summers ago and was back in this little pay fishing with a buzz bait. I saw a log that was pointing to my direction so I could make a cast to shore and run the buzzbait right down the length of it. I ran it once without getting bit and thought if something is there I just stirred him up so I cast again same spot and ran it the same place and halfway down the log a 2.5 pound bass exploded on my buzzbait and I got him into the boat. The next morning I was again back out on the water and went back in there again and went to that same log just to see if he was still there sure enough first cast he exploded on my buzzbait again. I truely beleive they setup a homebase somewhere and only move when the conditions are making them uncomfortable or its time to breed.

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