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Tying Your Lures Vs Snap Swivels

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What are the advantages or  disadvantages of tying or using a snap swivels for your lures.

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Snaps are fast and some baits benefit from the added room to move versus tying directly.

 

Snaps are can also kill the action in some baits. I get lazy if I'm using a snap and don't retie as often as I should, which results in lost fish and baits. If you lose a bait and snap it's just cost you that much more. Most wire baits can't be fished with a snap without some tweaking. If fish are skittish it's just one more thing that may turn them off. 

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The only lure I'll use a snap swivel on is an in-line spinner. I rarely fish spoons anymore, but that's another that I'd consider.  I find that the swivel will make a crank roll over when bumping it into cover and on my prop baits it's dificult to get that spitting, quick spin off the blade. 

If I'm looking to get a little more action from my cranks, I'll tie a loop knot. I also become lazy about retying. My eyesight isn't what it used to be, but I'd rather struggle a little tying a knot than either loose a fish, or loose out on hooking one.

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 I always tie.I too will use a loop knot to get better action out of some lures.Im a firm believer in less is more when it comes to my presentation to skittish fish.

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The OP's ? Was snap swivels, not snaps. I haven't used a snap swivel bass fishing in 50 years.

I use high quality snaps for several lure presentations, tie direct to all hooks.

Tom

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The OP's ? Was snap swivels, not snaps. I haven't used a snap swivel bass fishing in 50 years.

I use high quality snaps for several lure presentations, tie direct to all hooks.

Tom

 

X2

 

 

 

 

 

Mike

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i tie direct.  like bluebasser said with snaps you'll retie less which means lost lures/fish b/c you're not being as aware of nicks in ur line.  tying on new lures makes you a good line checker.  also swivels pick up algae and weeds like static cling 

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snap/swivels never.

 

snaps on cranks and some top water.

 

Loop knot on poppers.

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wow my buddy and i have been using snap swivels for most things like total 'noobs'! I did feel like we were being lazy, and would benefit from directly tied soft plastics and such.   I didn't even know there was such a thing as snaps! d**n I've gotta start paying more attention, can't wait for the ice to melt! Look out fish!

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I use snaps swivels and snaps for cranks/spinners everything else I tie direct. I like the flexibility that you get with the quick change snaps and swivels for my search baits. 

 

Mitch

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I agree with what's already been said in part. A lot of fishermen do not know the difference between a snap-swivel and a plain snap. I use a snap on just about everything I throw, except for jigs or Texas rigged worms. I would NEVER use a snap-swivel on anything other than an inline spinner (just too much hardware to get in the way of the lure's presentation).

 

As far as loop knots go, you're taking one heck of a gamble there! Even fluoro abrades badly after a couple of fish, when using a loop knot instead of a snap. Some folks don't agree....that's just fine. I've lost a few nice fish (along with lures) when all I retrieved was two strands of the loop. I'll never use a loop again. But if it works for you, go for it! :)

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I have a condition called Essential Tremors, which means that my hands shake.  Tying a knot as simple as a Palomar can be a fifteen minute ordeal for me.  For that reason I use snaps, not snap-swivels, on almost every rod.  If I'm on the water and have to re-tie, I usually ask my co-angler to help me out.  I try to do this as little as possible, because it takes him away from his rod.

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  About the only time I use a snap is for crankbaits. I throw a lot of jerk baits & top water lures where a snap would kill the action. I remove the split rings from my top water & jerk baits and tie directly to the eye loop. With a crankbait a snap allows for quick changes and allows the lure to achieve whatever action it was designed for with no adverse effects, at least none that I am aware of.

   My main lures aside from what I mentioned earlier I throw a lot of jigs and rubber, and a snap would certainly not be right (for me) on either. When I'm fishing the Susquehanna River (Pittston area) I throw a lot of spoons, some spinners etc, and with these I will through a snap/swivel to aid in reducing line twist. 

   Hope this gives you some idea...feel free to ask me if you have any questions. Kirk

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I have used whats called a duo lock snap for many years and have had great success. Just use for cranks. Everything else is tied direct.

Tight Lines

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I use a 'snap' on shallow, squarebill, lipless cranks. Also on spinnerbaits depending on the brand Im throwing, Thats about it. Only time I use a swivels are barrel swivels on a tandem fluke set up.

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Two points of failure as opposed to one with a single knot. You can always use a loop knot for action if needed. 

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I retie after every fish, retie after a hang up or snag in brush, retie, retie, retie...  I can retie a loop knot in less than twenty seconds, how long do look for your pliers and have to squeeze?  Now I will have to admit that sometimes I just get in to big of a hurry and dont tie the knot just right and then watch a 5-15 dollar lure fly away and spend the next ten minutes chasing after it....but I still believe that a knot serves a LOT better than those clips, but thats just my opinion...

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I agree with what's already been said in part. A lot of fishermen do not know the difference between a snap-swivel and a plain snap. I use a snap on just about everything I throw, except for jigs or Texas rigged worms. I would NEVER use a snap-swivel on anything other than an inline spinner (just too much hardware to get in the way of the lure's presentation).

 

 

Bingo!!  Great answer.....this is what I do...

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I always direct tie

Lures like crankbaits have split rings which act as the loop knot and let the crank do what its suppose to do

The only downfall to direct tie is constantly cutting several inches of line off, which eventually leads to a respool

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I use duolock snaps on cranks. Everything else is tied direct. I also remove the factory split rings from my crankbaits thinking the snap will be roughly a one to one replacement for them in terms of weight and freedom of movement.

For the other folks who use snaps on cranks, do you keep the split ring or take it off?

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  With crank baits I replace the split ring with the oval split rings that are designed so line can not get caught or cut where the rings open, though on many crank baits I simply remove the split ring altogether. I never use standard round split rings on my crank baits. the only good use I can think of for the round split rings is to use to connect hooks to lure bodies.

 

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The OP's ? Was snap swivels, not snaps. I haven't used a snap swivel bass fishing in 50 years.

I use high quality snaps for several lure presentations, tie direct to all hooks.

Tom

Yep..............

I always use a duolock in freshwater, except for hooks and jigs.  I have used them in saltwater, but usually it's bb swivel, leader, then loopknot, fresh knots and leaders for each outing. I do not change lures near as often in the brine, but when I do using 20-40# leaders a loopknot doesn't slow me down too much.  Thinner leaders the loop is a little tougher to tie for me.

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If you do use snap swivels buy good ones. I was using some cheap ones I got at Walmart until I lost a koppers popper I had for about 3 casts. I don't even know how it failed, I went to cast then got a mean backlash and when I reeled in the line I had a broken snap on the end and my lure was gone.

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Over the past couple of years I have gotten away from using snaps for everything.  Now I only use them for crankbaits, and that is only when I know the fishing will be tough and I will need to change out baits quickly.

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I haven't used a snap since I was young and would fish for sunnies/bluegill back in NJ and I was using those eagle claw hooks with the line attached that had the loop at the top lol

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