Jump to content
Garret88

Best Time To Use Larger Profile Soft Plastics

Recommended Posts

Im trying to get a better grasp on the general rule of thumb when chosing soft plastics. When is it better to use a plastic with more appendages like a brush hog or creature compared to a tube/worm/craw etc?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

During the spawn is a good time for creature baits it really fires up the big girls, but also the heat of the summer when the fish have a very fast metabolism and a nice big meal that moves slow is just what the doctor ordered. also  darker water the bigger profile and appendages can help the fish locate the bait.

 

Mitch

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

During the spawn is a good time for creature baits it really fires up the big girls, but also the heat of the summer when the fish have a very fast metabolism and a nice big meal that moves slow is just what the doctor ordered. also  darker water the bigger profile and appendages can help the fish locate the bait.

 

Mitch

 

I figured the appendages would be good for moving more water when its murky. I always thought smaller profiles were better for the spawn because they arent really concerned with eating, they are more in protector mode. Unless that relates specifically to the males while bed fishing and not for the females that move off the beds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When ever the water is wet! ;)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I figured the appendages would be good for moving more water when its murky. I always thought smaller profiles were better for the spawn because they arent really concerned with eating, they are more in protector mode. Unless that relates specifically to the males while bed fishing and not for the females that move off the beds.

You are right that during the spawn the bass are in protection mode and not necessarily in feeding mode, but salamanders/ bluegills and crawfish among others are natural predators of the bass eggs, so the large profile creature bait does trigger the protection response from the bass. I also use small baits during the spawn, it is nice to have different shapes and sizes available to see the reaction of each bedding bass.

 

Mitch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a simple "Rule of thumb" I tend to gravitate more towards appendages/ribbontails the warmer the water gets.  The colder the more subtle I like my plastics to be.

 

Example

Colder waters - Chunk trailer on a jig

 

vs

 

Warm waters - Rage Craw on a silicone jig

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a simple "Rule of thumb" I tend to gravitate more towards appendages/ribbontails the warmer the water gets.  The colder the more subtle I like my plastics to be.

 

Example

Colder waters - Chunk trailer on a jig

 

vs

 

Warm waters - Rage Craw on a silicone jig

great answer, also the clearer the water the more natural i want my plastics to be, both size and color.  ps just because the water is 50 deg. doesnt mean a big hawg wont eat a 10in worm.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

great answer, also the clearer the water the more natural i want my plastics to be, both size and color.  ps just because the water is 50 deg. doesnt mean a big hawg wont eat a 10in worm.

I understand that completely. I guess I can just throw everything and let the fish tell me what they want.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's always been my theory!  There are so many perspectives, there is no right answer.  It's kinda like parenting - everybody has an opinion, but it doesn't mean diddly squat when you have a crying baby at 2AM. :)

 

As a rule of thumb, I subscribe to the warmer the water, the bigger your bait gets and the more action it should have.  If water clarity is a factor (gin clear), it's purely about looking natural IMO (don't forget to match the hatch).  There is a school of thought that using bigger baits in cold water will trigger an "I'm hungry and that will fill me up!" reaction bite, but that's a pretty low percentage strategy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Catt said best.

We have no idea when bass want something small or large, trail and error.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer to go with larger baits in a few circumstances;

1. Anytime the fish are aggressively feeding.

2. When the water is hot enough to make the fish lethargic, they'll often be looking for a big, easy meal.

3. In dirty water, a larger bait moves more water and is easier to find. Think of it this way, what's easier to find in a dark room, a small child, or a 300lb guy?

4. Anytime the fish are feeding on larger prey.

Obviously there will be exceptions to these rules, but those guidelines usually give me a good place to start anyways. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, I must say I thought it was the opposite: Hot water, go smaller. I didn't think about going bigger! No wonder I haven't nailed any hogs yet this year. 

 

Our waters are currently around 29c (84f) on the surface and the water has a dark green colour to it with lots of particles/insects suspended. Vis about 6 foot.

 

Maybe I should try a large lizard or some of ragetail worms. What colours would you recommend?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes small baits may be the answer at times, but to me, your situation sounds like a perfect one for a big worm or creature bait. 

 

Think dark colors in stained water, black/blue, black neon, grape, or junebug.

If the water is clearer then natural colors should rule, green pumpkin, watermelon, or motoroil.

 

Green pumpkin and solid black are pretty universal colors if you don't want to buy a bunch of different colors. If they won't eat your plastic in one of those two colors you're either not around fish or they aren't going to eat that bait at all that day. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks BlueBasser! 

 

I am heading off to the tackle shop tomorrow to get some big baits!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pick something - tossing something (even if it is wrong) is better than fretting about what to throw.  I always start big.  Why? I like big.  If big doesn't work, I might switch to smaller.  Or uglier.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lol.....I will for sure try that uglier suggestion.

Hootie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any time you are after a BIG fish no matter what time of year it is. You won't get as many bites, but your chances of catching larger fiush goes way up. Just depends on if your after numbers or size. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some thing to think about!

Texas Share-A-Lunker Program has 7 bass over 13 pounds caught on a Crappie Jig!

Jig-N-Craws are known for catching big bass but they aint but maybe 2 1/2-3" in lenght?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My largest bass on a swimbait to date is 15.2 lbs. on 8" Huud trout.

Big worm between 9" to 16" was 14.7 lbs on a 10" hand pour Otay Spl.

Top 5 giant bass between 17.4 lbs to 19.3 lbs all on jigs with 2 1/2" to 4" pork trailers.

Big and small lures work , just need to keep an open mind and go fishing and experiment with different presentations and lure size.

Tom

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember when you were younger and things just weren't going right. You were falling subject to overthinking a situation and your parents would look at you and say "use the KISS method" [Keep It Simple Stupid] Well when the water is cold, pressured, or post frontal ,or any days the fish are lock jawed, you can again use the KISS method.[Keep It Small n Slow].

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like worms on shaky heads. Smaller worms on heads up to 1/4, a little larger on the bubba 3/8 & 1/2 oz shaky heads.   I like creature baits/ lizards on jika rigs.   I am sad that Berkley doesn't make the 8" lizard any more.  I liked that bait.  It was a good bait starting out and you could tear up the head and shorten it several times and it was still an adequate bait.   There are very few situations where I  tx rig any more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×