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Kpterry82

Thoughts On Canoe Or Kayak

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So I bought a Jon boat last summer and love it. But here in Jersey I'm limited to where I can take it. There's probably only 5 or 6 ramps in my area. So I've been thinking about also getting a kayak to take to some of those remote spots. But I did find a review on a meyers sports pal canoe that peaked my interest. Trying to decide between the two. I've never fished out of either so any insight would be great.

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(copied & edited from one of my posts in a similar thread a while back)

 

To determine whether you want to get a canoe or a kayak, you need to make a list of your needs, and then determine which craft is the better fit for you. Some of the factors to consider:

 

Stabililty and standing capability (moving around, landing fish, another person or kids or dogs in the boat, standing to fish, etc.)

Cargo/gear storage (how much stuff do you want to take)

Inboard storage & handling (canoe) versus handling things in your lap or over the water (yak)

Seating position (usually, but not always more upright seating in a canoe vs. legs-out in yak - have back problems?)

Vessel weight (how much can you lift/transport)

Transportability - to the water and possible portaging (do you have a truck, trailer, going to car-top, need to portage, etc.)

Ease of paddling

Will you want the capability to motor it?

Manueverability

Type of water (lakes, streams, white water, etc.)

Number of people in the craft

Stay mostly dry or don't mind getting a bit wet

Length of voyage (couple hours or a couple days)

Etc.

 

Once you answer those questions based on your own capabilities and needs, you'll come closer to chosing either a canoe, a yak, or a hybrid. All are great watercraft in their own ways, you just have to find the best fit for YOU.

 

I faced the same decision as you are tying to make now but I was open to all types of small watercraft from float tubes up to bass boats. The best solution for ME, was a heavily accessorized canoe. I only fish my local, small (1.5 to 201 acres), no-wake lakes. Some of these lakes don't have boat ramps. I needed something car-topable without a special rack, modular, very light weight, with as much capability as possible. I wanted stability so I could stand and fish all day, lots of inboard storage, motorized, and little to no maintenance. I didn't want to have to buy a truck or other tow vehicle, I didn't want to consume a garage bay or driveway space with a boat and trailer, didn't want high expense and high maintenance, and didn't want to use gasoline power. Taking everything into account, I ended up with a canoe, trolling motor, and outriggers for stability.

 

My canoe is a Radisson - very similar to the Sportspal:

 

gallery_25379_1107_306662.jpg

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After seeing your setup I'm def leaning towards a canoe. That's awesome! I have lots of gear and would love to start taking my son along as soon as he's able to have an attention span longer then 10 minutes. Where do you store it? Did you make the outriggers yourself? Are they needed or did you just add them for insurance?

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Goose is correct in everything he said. You need to decide what will work best for you and one of the best ways to find that out is to demo as many as possible if you can. There are a couple of ways that can be done. 1. Find a local dealer that will let you demo a few or go to their demo day so that you can test several back to back. Although I do support my local shop I think the best way to check out several boats at once is to try to find a local kayak fishing club and see if they will let you tag along to one of their get togethers. There you can see how others have rigged their kayaks and see what may fit you. Buying a kayak or canoe is really pretty personal and what works for me may or may not work for you so do a little research before hand and answer the questions Goose put out there. 

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After seeing your setup I'm def leaning towards a canoe. That's awesome! I have lots of gear and would love to start taking my son along as soon as he's able to have an attention span longer then 10 minutes. Where do you store it? Did you make the outriggers yourself? Are they needed or did you just add them for insurance?

 

Well, the possibility of taking your son with you answers one of the questions above.

 

I car top the canoe. Everything is modular and detachable. It takes less than 15 minutes to rig lakeside. The canoe and all the gear stores in a dolly that I built for it (my wife calls it the canoe hutch :lol:).  The outriggers are store-bought (Spring Creek Outfitters) but there are also lots of ways to make outriggers yourself.  My canoe is only 12 feet (actually 11'6") long and I consider the outriggers mandatory since I stand nearly the entire time that I'm on the water.  With a longer, heavier canoe, which usually translates to added stability, the outriggers would just be for insurance. 

 

gallery_25379_89_69694.jpg

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I fish lakes, rivers and tidal rivers, Here is my Wilderness Systems Ride 115. Stable enough to stand and fish due to the hull design. I think one of my favorite things about fishing from a kayak is that I can leave my office and be paddling on the local reservoir or the Upper Potomac River in under 60 minutes.

 

Ride115_zpse88aafa0.jpg

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Thanks guys! I guess I'm going to have to get out there and test some out as soon as this water softens up. I think for me though the canoe is the way to go. When I go down the list Goose put together it's seems like we have a lot of the same needs and wants. But I'd still like to test some kayaks because it seems like there are lots of yak enthusiasts on here. Thanks again.

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I fish lakes, rivers and tidal rivers, Here is my Wilderness Systems Ride 115. Stable enough to stand and fish due to the hull design. I think one of my favorite things about fishing from a kayak is that I can leave my office and be paddling on the local reservoir or the Upper Potomac River in under 60 minutes.

 

Ride115_zpse88aafa0.jpg

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Nice ride! Do you do the majority of your fishing sitting or standing?

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I fish lakes, rivers and tidal rivers, Here is my Wilderness Systems Ride 115. Stable enough to stand and fish due to the hull design. I think one of my favorite things about fishing from a kayak is that I can leave my office and be paddling on the local reservoir or the Upper Potomac River in under 60 minutes.

Ride115_zpse88aafa0.jpg

What is the length of the 115?

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Well, the possibility of taking your son with you answers one of the questions above.

 

I car top the canoe. Everything is modular and detachable. It takes less than 15 minutes to rig lakeside. The canoe and all the gear stores in a dolly that I built for it (my wife calls it the canoe hutch :lol:).  The outriggers are store-bought (Spring Creek Outfitters) but there are also lots of ways to make outriggers yourself.  My canoe is only 12 feet (actually 11'6") long and I consider the outriggers mandatory since I stand nearly the entire time that I'm on the water.  With a longer, heavier canoe, which usually translates to added stability, the outriggers would just be for insurance. 

 

something is out of place there.... your garage is far too clean to be called a garage.

nice setup.

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Nice ride! Do you do the majority of your fishing sitting or standing?

 

Thanks! The majority of the time I am sitting. That model seat in the Ride can be set in high position which gives me another 5 inches or so of elevation (enough to pitch jigs from a seated position). If conditions warrant however it is nice to stand and fish crankbaits and spinnerbaits (you can cast farther and manipulate the rod angle for the best presentation).

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What is the length of the 115?

 

The Ride 115 is 11.5 feet (and the longer Ride "135" is 13.5 feet long)

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I'll chime in here, having done both, I prefer to fish 

out of a hybrid kayak - which is part kayak and 

part canoe.

 

Mine is a Native Watercraft Ultimate 12, the other

hybrid is made by Wilderness Systems and is the 

Commander.

 

You can get the Ultimate in a longer version that

can easily take two people. You sit lower to the 

water like a kayak, can still outfit it like a canoe

for the most part.

 

Here's mine (Been outfitted with new trolling motor

since this pic). I control my trolling motor with my 

feet (direction), and have a control box for the 

5/3 speed settings on my left hand next to my seat.

 

U12 + Motorguide/Predator Mounted

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I personally owned a canoe and could not stand it.  Tippy and very clumsy to move around.   I got the Ride 115x last year and loved it!

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I admit that I've never been in a good canoe (or fishing canoe, if there is such a thing.)...but I did rent a canoe to fish on a small lake on two different occasions.  The first time was such a battle with the wind that I did little fishing.  The second time it seemed like the wind was better so I tried it again.  Turns out the 'marina' was on the leeward side and as soon as I hit open water, I was toast.  I found a few sheltered shores to beat, but I was very tempted to beach the dang thing at the windward end and walk home.  Fighting the wind alone in a canoe was not something I want to experience again.....ever.

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I also use a kayak, the Nucanoe Frontier 12'. Stable and very versatile. What sold me on it was the square motor-ready transom, the track system allows the seats(1 or 2) to be placed where you want, and you can use any swivel seat(allowing 360 degree fishing). They sell 3 different height seat bases also, giving you many options.

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Whatever hull you choose should fit your fishing style - get some seat time, go to some demo days and take your time making your decision!  Personally, I prefer the safety of a sit on top kayak hull, but your waters and fishing style/needs may dictate otherwise.  Good luck and keep us posted on your ultimate decision!  You could say that I'm a little biased towards Hobie, but I also have seat time in Natives, Ocean Kayaks, Wilderness Systems and Jacksons.  Kayaks and canoes are awesome tools to get you closer to the fish!

 

2015 Hobie Outback

HobieQuest13

PTL Tweaked1

HobieRevo13

Hobie8

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Very Good video on the Sports Pal! Very in depth review of it. The reviewer is also from Jersey so he talks about how useful to take it to all the little ponds and lakes

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I admit that I've never been in a good canoe (or fishing canoe, if there is such a thing.)...but I did rent a canoe to fish on a small lake on two different occasions.  The first time was such a battle with the wind that I did little fishing.  The second time it seemed like the wind was better so I tried it again.  Turns out the 'marina' was on the leeward side and as soon as I hit open water, I was toast.  I found a few sheltered shores to beat, but I was very tempted to beach the dang thing at the windward end and walk home.  Fighting the wind alone in a canoe was not something I want to experience again.....ever.

 

That may be because you have never been fishing with me.

 

And that is not an invite.

 

:eyebrows:

 

A-Jay

 

post-13860-0-58758500-1353867504_thumb.j
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Quite true  :)    I haven't.  No invite?  :cry4:

 

I forgot to mention that I have fished from canoes with my wife on a few occasions and readily admit that handling a canoe in wind or current is FAR easier with two than it is alone.

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Quite true  :)    I haven't.  No invite?  :cry4:

 

I forgot to mention that I have fished from canoes with my wife on a few occasions and readily admit that handling a canoe in wind or current is FAR easier with two than it is alone.

 

Nope

 

I was just having a little fun.

 

And the wind is always a challenge for any small craft.

 

A-Jay

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Very Good video on the Sports Pal! Very in depth review of it. The reviewer is also from Jersey so he talks about how useful to take it to all the little ponds and lakes

This is the review I was talking about. I wasn't even thinking a canoe until I saw this. was just going to go with a kayak. But after everyone's replies I think I really need to try some out. I'm heading to the outdoor show in Harrisburg next week so hopefully I can get some more hands on info there.

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I'll chime in here, having done both, I prefer to fish 

out of a hybrid kayak - which is part kayak and 

part canoe.

 

Mine is a Native Watercraft Ultimate 12, the other

hybrid is made by Wilderness Systems and is the 

Commander.

 

You can get the Ultimate in a longer version that

can easily take two people. You sit lower to the 

water like a kayak, can still outfit it like a canoe

for the most part.

 

Here's mine (Been outfitted with new trolling motor

since this pic). I control my trolling motor with my 

feet (direction), and have a control box for the 

5/3 speed settings on my left hand next to my seat.

Another nice ride! I'm getting jealous over here hows the stability in that? I'm really hoping to do most of my fishing standing.

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I stand quite often. And you can see in my avatar

that I sit up on the gunnels, as well. I have no 

balance problems at all.

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