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okay so, ive made a few posts the past 2 weeks about spinning rods and reels. eventually i bring up the topic of "choking points" and it never seems to really get elaborated on.. so here it is...

 

Am I the only one who checks for the choking point on their spinning rods before buying?

 

 a little insight on this subject matter... the choking point on a spinning rod is measured with your reel mounted to the rod with the spool fully removed. you then align the spool axle with a straight edge (i.e. a door, counter, table, work bench etc). with the naked eye, line up the spool axle with that straight edge as best you can. at that point, your rod will eventually intersect that line, and will cross over, or hang off that edge. wherever your rod intersects the straight edge is the choking point of that rod and reel combo. the more straight the rod is to the edge, the better that reel will work on that rod.

 

anyways, the reason for this post is not just to see who else checks this, but to see if anyone has suggestions for good,great and perfect rod/reel combos. i went ahead and bought a daiwa lexa 7'3 spinning rod and cant find a reel that works well with it. (im sure the lexa line of reels are the right match but my pockets  currently have some holes)

 

i have a shimano sahara 2500 and new daiwa revros 2500. i dont need a bigger reel because i dont need all that line capacity. and id like to keep it all light weight. but if a 3000 series reel will fix my problem then so be it!

 

i am open and interested in hearing about your combos and how well they work together, especially regarding the choke point.

 

i used to have a 7ft abu garcia vengeance spinning rod, with a penn fierce 3000 reel. quite heavy, but the alignment was terrific, the choking point was nice and high up on the rod, but ive moved on to lighter and better things now!

 

so please, pardon my obnoxious, continuous phrase use, and lets hear it guys!

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Interested also. I use nothing but.baitcast and soon will get my first spin combo. So choke points are new too me

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Rainshadow Immortal 7'2" ML and a Shimano Stradic Ci4+ 2500. IDK about all the "choking point" stuff but these pair perfectly and combined are as light and balanced as I have ever felt.

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I rarely touch a spinning rod though so it's not something I'd ever check. I paired a light reel with a light rod and that's it. I use it when we kayak the river because it's simple. Other than that it collects dust.

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I've never even heard of this. Interesting, I think.

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Choking point? Sounds like where my wife lands when I tell her I'm buying a new rod or reel....lol.

Hootie

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deviating from optimal choke guide sizing will very minimally affect casting distance if any , i used a

20,12,8, then (8) 3.5's to the tip on a 7'8'' M/XF spinning rod with a 16'' handle (SK2 split reel seat) , this is with a Pflueger Patriarch magnesium size 40 reel , the rod builder didn't approve of the guide sizes but did it with my persuasion , the rod casts extremely well and is very light .  here's a picture of the guide train .  

post-17671-0-83643300-1439967415_thumb.j

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The choking point is where your running guides start.  This all part of a bigger system for aligning guides on custom built spinning rods.  There's more to it than just the choking point, properly sized and placed guides along the way are what makes this system work.  I'm not sure how it translates to rods that are already built.

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The choking point is where your running guides start. This all part of a bigger system for aligning guides on custom built spinning rods. There's more to it than just the choking point, properly sized and placed guides along the way are what makes this system work. I'm not sure how it translates to rods that are already built.

Correct. It's been said that you probably won't get a perfect match with a production rod, but if you can find a match up that's close, the better!

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This could be why some setups cast easier than the others?

On my spinning reels n rods I bend the last eye to match the angle of the face of the spinning reel. Sometimes I go a tad more so the line from the reel feeds frictionless into the first eyelet on the rod.

Distance in shore fishing matters.

How many balance the reel to the rod using a wood screw and

Flatwashers?

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This could be why some setups cast easier than the others?

Correct! And also will prevent line slapping against the blank, which I've had previously

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Choking point? Sounds like where my wife lands when I tell her I'm buying a new rod or reel....lol.

Hootie

 

beat me to it....  this is the only choking going on at my house.

 

seriously, had never heard of choking point before this thread.

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Correct! And also will prevent line slapping against the blank, which I've had previously

line slap will happen with the stripper guide , the first guide from the reel , a choke guide is a transion guide to the running guides , usaully 3 or 4 guides down , and will not have anything to do with line slap ...

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line slap will happen with the stripper guide , the first guide from the reel , a choke guide is a transion guide to the running guides , usaully 3 or 4 guides down , and will not have anything to do with line slap ...

Depending on the angle of the spool axle and spool itself, a well a placement of the stripper guide has an effect on line slap, no?

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Add me to the list.  Not only have I never heard of it, I've read the 'definition paragraph' above four times and I understand it less now than I did after the first time


 a little insight on this subject matter... the choking point on a spinning rod is measured with your reel mounted to the rod with the spool fully removed. you then align the spool axle with a straight edge (i.e. a door, counter, table, work bench etc). with the naked eye, line up the spool axle with that straight edge as best you can. at that point, your rod will eventually intersect that line, and will cross over, or hang off that edge. wherever your rod intersects the straight edge is the choking point of that rod and reel combo. the more straight the rod is to the edge, the better that reel will work on that rod.

 

 

I may need pictures

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Depending on the angle of the spool axle and spool itself, a well a placement of the stripper guide has an effect on line slap, no?

the placement , ring size , and more importantly , the ring height ( the height of the guide off the blank ) that's where the line is begining it's path down the guide train , making the loops off your reel contained to go through your guides , take a look at the video demontration of the Micro Wave line control system , you will get an idea of how the stripper guide and choke guides work , their whole system is to bring the line loops off the reel down to virtually no loops within 2 guides there for creating less friction on the guides giving you longer casts . the straighter your line will go through your guides the less friction there is being caused by line loops coming off the reel .

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the placement , ring size , and more importantly , the ring height ( the height of the guide off the blank ) that's where the line is begining it's path down the guide train , making the loops off your reel contained to go through your guides , take a look at the video demontration of the Micro Wave line control system , you will get an idea of how the stripper guide and choke guides work , their whole system is to bring the line loops off the reel down to virtually no loops within 2 guides there for creating less friction on the guides giving you longer casts . the straighter your line will go through your guides the less friction there is being caused by line loops coming off the reel .

Correct, in which case determines how far the line is from the blank, in part with the spool angle, will determine if your line will contact the blank during retrieve. Like mine does

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Add me to the list. Not only have I never heard of it, I've read the 'definition paragraph' above four times and I understand it less now than I did after the first time

I may need pictures

http://anglersresource.net/WhattoLookforinaTopShelfSpinningRod.aspx

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A spinning rod guide train based on the New Guide Concept consits of:

 

1. Stripper Guide - first closest to the reel

2. Reduction Guides - next 2-3 gradually decreasing in size

3. Choke Guide - First running guide of smallest in the train. There are several theories regarding the optimal placement for the choke. The "Straight Edge" as decribed above is one, "27X" (27 times the spool diameter measured from the spool face in the foremost oscillation point) is another and the newest used by custom builders is Fuji's KR Rapid Choke Concept which uses smaller rings on high frame "Match Guides" and a closer choke point. The result is a better casting, lighter and crisper finished rod.

4. Running guides - out to the tip

5. Tip Top - same ring size as running guides

 

The idea is to tame the coils as they are pulled off the reel resulting in better casting. Ring size and height of the stripper and taming guides is another major component of any of the afore mentioned systems. As a starting point looking at producrion rods, pick one with a stripper guide about 1/2 the diameter of the spool you'll use. Then sight down through the guides: ideally they will form a "Bullseye" between the stripper and choke.  Better yet: contact me or another reputable builder and have a rod done right from scratch without having to co-mingle theories and handle dozens of factory rods just to end up in a compromise anyway. 

 

Ps

 

"Line slap" typically refers to casting. Incidental contact between the line and blank during retrieve is inconsequential in anything but a heavy saltwater rod where heat may be generated during a long run by big fish. 

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Thank you.  I understand better what you were talking about.  Now I just need to think about whether or not its important to me.....and maybe check some of my current combinations.  I do so little real casting with spinning rods anymore, that I doubt I'm going to care much.  I do some sidearm fluke-type throwing and then its mostly drop-shotting and shakey heading, which I doubt are going to be too dependent on that choke thing.....but, may be worth looking at and mixing and matching my gear for better choke points.

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i too was utterly confused, but that link with pics actually helps to make sense of this thing.  But i'm with Choporoz, i don't think it matters to me in the grand scheme.  I would think that if you're that particular about the combo, somebody like mike at DVT would need to build you a custom to meet all your specifications.  This just seems like something that is so technical you wouldn't be able to achieve the perfect balance with the off the shelf rods....

not to mention i do too much musical chair swapping of reels and rods to ever think about making such a perfectly balanced combo....

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i too was utterly confused, but that link with pics actually helps to make sense of this thing. But i'm with Choporoz, i don't think it matters to me in the grand scheme. I would think that if you're that particular about the combo, somebody like mike at DVT would need to build you a custom to meet all your specifications. This just seems like something that is so technical you wouldn't be able to achieve the perfect balance with the off the shelf rods....

not to mention i do too much musical chair swapping of reels and rods to ever think about making such a perfectly balanced combo....

Over thinking, can take all the fun out of fishing.

Hootie

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I fIsh only spinning, never heard of a choking point, good bet I've never done it or will, don't balance either. 

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Over thinking, can take all the fun out of fishing.

Hootie

Nailed it.

I do however, have one of DVTs rods, and it is worth every penny.

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