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CrustyMono

Pressure Treated vs Water Sealed

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Which is the better option for a casting deck and its support?

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Aluminum. ;)

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Get a good quality birch plywood and put a few coats of spar varnish on it. It's less expensive and easier to find than marine plywood and should do you well.

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Well I used pressure treated, and covered it with some ice and water shield for roofing I had left over, then on top of that I put some anti fatigue matting,,,, swivel chair also,,,, 

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Never allow pressure treated wood to be in contact with the aluminum. Ask Kris. He has a complete super long post on here about his "next reservoir rig. He spent all summer sealing a ton of little pin holes and other issues caused by someone who did just that.  He just finally created  a terrific boat. Instead of 2x4 pressure treated wood for supports he used that plastic wood called Azek wood. It turned out great.

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For future reference, pressure treated wood and plywood is considerably heavier than untreated wood.  As stated above, chemicals in pressure treated wood can create all manner of problems in boats. 

No matter which type of wood you use, the best solution to keep the wood dry is to open your hatch covers as much as possible to provide plenty of ventilation to remove accumulated moisture.  It's not just the wood, but other gear including clothing stored in the compartments will grow mold and mildew in a warm damp environment.

If you keep your boat in a secure area, leave all your hatches wide open.  If it's stored outside, open the hatches on dry, breezy, sunny days when you will be around.  Just a few hours will remove a lot of moisture from the bilge and compartments of your boat.

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1 hour ago, fishnkamp said:

Never allow pressure treated wood to be in contact with the aluminum. Ask Kris. He has a complete super long post on here about his "next reservoir rig. He spent all summer sealing a ton of little pin holes and other issues caused by someone who did just that.  He just finally created  a terrific boat. Instead of 2x4 pressure treated wood for supports he used that plastic wood called Azek wood. It turned out great.

I think this is why you use Hot Dip Galvanized bolts with green treated because other types of metal will have a bad chemical reaction to the treated wood.

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Pressure treated in boats don't work well.  First, the bulk of it is low grade plywood so you have to use a heavier, thicker piece to keep it from flexing as you walk on it, plus a host of other problems.

I prefer to spend a few dollars more and use 1/2" Raw MDO, it is the best and about the stiffest you can use.

If you want cheap, get 1/2" B/C, it's a 5 ply pine with exterior glue.  It's about as strong as marine grade, holds up as good as marine for decks and floors, but 1/2 the price.

Make sure what ever you use is 1/2" and is 5 or 7 ply with exterior glue.  Which you may not find at Lowes or HD.  With MDO, you can use 3/8" if the pieces are braced so there are no large areas you will be walking on.   I have used 3/8" B/C in floors of jons that have raised ribs fairly close and wanted to limit the added weight.

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CrustyMono  Take a few minutes and read through this topic that Kris, my friend, covered the steps he wen through to build his present electric only boat. He also has an old Ranger he is going to restore and run on larger waters.  http://www.baybass.com/forum/index.php?topic=925.0

 

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Aluminum, weld it, & be done with it ;)

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On 9/24/2016 at 6:04 PM, Catt said:

Aluminum. ;)

 

7 hours ago, Catt said:

Aluminum, weld it, & be done with it ;)

I'm on my first boat with aluminum decking...there really is no comparison...too bad it's such a PITA for most folks to work with.

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On ‎9‎/‎25‎/‎2016 at 3:29 AM, tcbass said:

I think this is why you use Hot Dip Galvanized bolts with green treated because other types of metal will have a bad chemical reaction to the treated wood.

I'd avoid any galvanized product on a boat, hot dipped or electroplated.  I'd prefer monel, bronze or stainless steel fastenings especially if the boat will see any use in salt water.

Sacrificial anodes are made of zinc, since it will prevent electrolysis from destroying other metal components/fasteners on boats.

When I was a kid, I used some brass fastenings, because they would not rust, on a boat I had in salt water.  Big, big mistake.  Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc.  The zinc dissolved ,leaving nothing but the porous copper behind.  I could literally pull the boat apart with my bare hands.

Plain steel would have lasted longer.

Salt water is an electrolyte, so you have two things at work, electrolysis and galvanic action.

The process of coating metals with copper, chrome, etc., takes place when an electric current is introduced in the process by electrolysis..  Galvanic action produces electricity, such as you have in a battery where you have dissimilar metal in an electrolyte.

When I was a commercial lobsterman, I used Rolls Surette batteries in my boat.  The place where I bought them added the electrolyte to a battery when it was sold.  This prevented the slow deterioration that takes place in a battery once it was filled.

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8 hours ago, Further North said:

 

I'm on my first boat with aluminum decking...there really is no comparison...too bad it's such a PITA for most folks to work with.

Aluminum aint no harder to work with than wood!

With the prices of building materials going through the roof aluminum is better option because you use less material for bracing.

I've bought sheet aluminum from my local DOTD that was old road signs.

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6 hours ago, Fishing Rhino said:

I'd avoid any galvanized product on a boat, hot dipped or electroplated.  I'd prefer monel, bronze or stainless steel fastenings especially if the boat will see any use in salt water.

Sacrificial anodes are made of zinc, since it will prevent electrolysis from destroying other metal components/fasteners on boats.

When I was a kid, I used some brass fastenings, because they would not rust, on a boat I had in salt water.  Big, big mistake.  Brass is an alloy of copper and zinc.  The zinc dissolved ,leaving nothing but the porous copper behind.  I could literally pull the boat apart with my bare hands.

Plain steel would have lasted longer.

Salt water is an electrolyte, so you have two things at work, electrolysis and galvanic action.

The process of coating metals with copper, chrome, etc., takes place when an electric current is introduced in the process by electrolysis..  Galvanic action produces electricity, such as you have in a battery where you have dissimilar metal in an electrolyte.

When I was a commercial lobsterman, I used Rolls Surette batteries in my boat.  The place where I bought them added the electrolyte to a battery when it was sold.  This prevented the slow deterioration that takes place in a battery once it was filled.

 

Yep, I didn't say use it for a boat, just that that's why I believe you are supposed to use hot dip galvanized with treated wood.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Catt said:

Aluminum ain't no harder to work with than wood!

If you have the right tools - most folks don't have the right tools to cut, join or form it.  I am fortunate that I have a friend in the business and find it easy to get parts cut and bent.

 

6 hours ago, Catt said:

With the prices of building materials going through the roof aluminum is better option because you use less material for bracing.

I've bought sheet aluminum from my local DOTD that was old road signs.

I agree 100%; also lasts longer, is lighter and stronger...and I really like your idea for a source!

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13 hours ago, Catt said:

Aluminum aint no harder to work with than wood!

With the prices of building materials going through the roof aluminum is better option because you use less material for bracing.

I've bought sheet aluminum from my local DOTD that was old road signs.

Department of Transportation...Department???B)

There is a tin boat forum where most of the guys build project boats such as the OP's. Old road signs get used more often than one would think.

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1 hour ago, slonezp said:

Department of Transportation...Department???B)

There is a tin boat forum where most of the guys build project boats such as the OP's. Old road signs get used more often than one would think.

Louisiana Department of Transportation & Development

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2 hours ago, slonezp said:

Department of Transportation...Department???B)

There is a tin boat forum where most of the guys build project boats such as the OP's. Old road signs get used more often than one would think.

I wonder how many of those road signs are really old...and how many are acquired via Midnight Acquisition, Inc..

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7 hours ago, chadmack282 said:

midnight aquisition signs work just as good!!

Remember the OP is a high school kid and reply appropriately.

Tom

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