Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Let's say.. someone is trying to figure out exactly how a reels max drag, and line size works in order to land a massive fish!?

Example: if you have 65lbs braid and a reel drag of 13lbs or so, can you lock down the tension, hook the fish, and just horse him back to the boat? A big fish.. like a 10 pounder? I mean, you won't break him off right?  Can you just start reeling him in non stop until the bass is in the boat? 

Is there actually a point in letting him try to take off line, or give him less tension to run? Playing or fighting the fish with that much reel Power and line strength would be pointless?

i guess this is more a baitcast kind of question, because growing up using spinning reels and 6-8lbs mono, I've always let the fish tire out before landing it. But it seems as tho having "overkill" fishing gear can allow someone to just manhandle the bass back to the boat without the fear of break off.. a bait cast is a winch right? So if all math adds up.. you should be able to set the hook good, winch on him and reel away...

thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even though your using very stout tackle there are always variables.  Like fish not hooked well and just tearing a lip off or something like that.  You do have the advantage though....ya see the pro's winch em in all the time.  I prefer a bit lighter stuff and enjoy the ride as you say....seem to get more bites too.  Good luck.  

P.S.  No fun breaking that stuff....no fun

Edited by Oregon Native
adding on
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can, yes. It's funny. Since guys have gone over to using these heavy braids with freshwater gear, you tend to see the rod being the weak part in the equation. If you're using 50 lb braid and have a decent reel, the rod is probably going to give before anything else does. I couldn't believe it when I heard about people using lines that heavy, but having gotten a little more experience with flipping in heavier cover, it makes some sense. Still a bit of culture shock coming from saltwater though. I've seen guys land 40" red drum on 15 lb test with no issues and in freshwater we're yanking a 3 lb bass out of the water with 50 lb test. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BrackishBassin said:

 in freshwater we're yanking a 3 lb bass out of the water with 50 lb test. 

And loving it!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2016-11-18 at 0:45 AM, juicebass said:

Let's say.. someone is trying to figure out exactly how a reels max drag, and line size works in order to land a massive fish!?

Example: if you have 65lbs braid and a reel drag of 13lbs plus, can you lock down the tension, hook the fish, and just horse him back to the boat? A big fish.. like a 10 pounder? I mean, you won't break him off right?  Can you just start reeling him in non stop until the bass is in the boat? 

Is there actually a point in letting him try to take off line, or give him less tension to run? Playing or fighting the fish with that much reel Power and line strength would be pointless?

i guess this is more a baitcast kind of question, because growing up using spinning reels and 6-8lbs mono, I've always let the fish tire out before landing it. But it seems as tho having "overkill" fishing gear can allow someone to just manhandle the bass back to the boat without the fear of break off..

thoughts?

Ya I guess breaking the rod is the only variable at that point.. I just wanted to know if anyone ever lost a fish because their tension was full and the bass basically went for a run and ripped his lip or what not...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, juicebass said:

Ya I guess breaking the rod is the only variable at that point.. I just wanted to know if anyone ever lost a fish because their tension was full and the bass basically went for a run and ripped his lip or what not...

Haven't lost any bass for that reason, that I'm aware of. I have lost some pickerel that way though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have watched guys skiing fish back to the boat, and I always ask, WHY?  Where is the fun in that?  I think that mentality has been brought to us via Tournament Fishing.  I enjoy a spirited fight where the fish has a chance.  I have lost my fair share, but it is worth it.  BTW, I use as strong a line as I think I can get away with so as not to break off fish, leaving a hook or lure in their mouth.  LOVE a good, drag ripping fight!

I will say this, however; sometimes you need to get a fish out of cover quickly in order not to be broken off.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎11‎/‎18‎/‎2016 at 0:45 AM, juicebass said:

Let's say.. someone is trying to figure out exactly how a reels max drag, and line size works in order to land a massive fish!?

Example: if you have 65lbs braid and a reel drag of 13lbs or so, can you lock down the tension, hook the fish, and just horse him back to the boat? A big fish.. like a 10 pounder? I mean, you won't break him off right?  Can you just start reeling him in non stop until the bass is in the boat? 

Is there actually a point in letting him try to take off line, or give him less tension to run? Playing or fighting the fish with that much reel Power and line strength would be pointless?

i guess this is more a baitcast kind of question, because growing up using spinning reels and 6-8lbs mono, I've always let the fish tire out before landing it. But it seems as tho having "overkill" fishing gear can allow someone to just manhandle the bass back to the boat without the fear of break off.. a bait cast is a winch right? So if all math adds up.. you should be able to set the hook good, winch on him and reel away...

thoughts?

What you're asking is a fairly tough thing to describe - especially accurately enough to where you could get a real sense of what happens. 

Best way is to simply experience it.  Admittedly I am not this great catcher of many Double Digit bass, but I've caught a few.  One thing I had in my favor is I was fishing for them specifically, so my tackle reflected that.  As challenging as a 10 pound bass can fight - it doesn't have to be that big to get your attention.  I've had many fish that were quite a bit smaller hand me my lunch especially if and when I wasn't ready for them.  I try not to let that happen much but it still does.  Part of the fun. 

 Seems "Fighting" a bass is little different with most everyone.  Some like to speed reel, others like to pull with the rod, and others still want the fight to last, - I'm some where in the middle there but ultimately what to put the fish in the net.

To your point and specifically to your past experience,  where fishing with 6-8 lb test can & does land it's fair share of big bass, when presenting baits in & around mid - to heavy cover (which is a good place to look) a tackle upgrade is a good plan.  The "Drag" is important but I see it as part of a balance fishing system that includes the rod, reel, line & terminal tackle all working together effectively.   So here, an incorrectly set drag (too tight or too loose) and be just as detrimental to landing a hard fighting bass as the wrong rod, line or terminal tackle.  This doesn't take into account that each fish has it's own "fighting" personality and some fight a whole lot more than others.  I like the little ones to pull like crazy and the super fat ones to simply swim into my net . . . .

:smiley:

A-Jay

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Fisher-O-men said:

I have watched guys skiing fish back to the boat, and I always ask, WHY?  Where is the fun in that?  I think that mentality has been brought to us via Tournament Fishing.  I enjoy a spirited fight where the fish has a chance.  I have lost my fair share, but it is worth it.  BTW, I use as strong a line as I think I can get away with so as not to break off fish, leaving a hook or lure in their mouth.  LOVE a good, drag ripping fight!

I will say this, however; sometimes you need to get a fish out of cover quickly in order not to be broken off.

When fishing big baits also 5+ Oz it's not about fighting the fish . it's about grinding her to the boat asap. so when you get that monster in you can enjoy holding weighing her. take a quick pic and sending her on her way. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I moved from PA to TX and fish Lake Fork and I never felt fish with this much power. And it's the 5 to 7lbrs that are big but not overweight, like a pro athlete that take it to ya. Anyway I'm fishing Mentaniums & Aldebarans and have fish pull line on locked down drags. Or if I'm reeling the handle simply turns. I lost 4 nice fish this yr because of it and the fish ended up wrapping me around a stump.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I musky fish with 80 lb braid.  All my reels have 20+ lbs of drag, and I always crank the drag down about as tight as I can.  On the rare occasion that I get bit, I horse them back as fast as I can.  I doubt that I've ever had a fight that lasted more than a minute.  My main goal is to get the fish back in the water ASAP after I first set the hook.

For bass, if you're using strong hooks, and your rod is rated for heavy braid, you should be fine.  But there's a trade-off.  In open water, I think you catch more fish if you play them, because you can avoid losing them when you skin-hook them, which happens often with light-wire hooks.  After I set the hook on a big smallie, I loosen the drag considerably.  On the other hand, if you're in heavy cover, you probably want to get the fish in as fast as possible, so it doesn't get stuck on something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Dad always used to say..."quit ****in' around and get 'im in the boat!"  And so I've always done that as best I can.  I especilly have no desire to play out fish coming from shallow heavy cover.  Whack 'em and stack em, flip & skip...whatever.  ASAP.  Git'er done!  Have yer pity party elsewhere;)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎11‎/‎25‎/‎2016 at 11:15 AM, Fisher-O-men said:

I have watched guys skiing fish back to the boat, and I always ask, WHY?  Where is the fun in that?  I think that mentality has been brought to us via Tournament Fishing.  I enjoy a spirited fight where the fish has a chance.  I have lost my fair share, but it is worth it.  BTW, I use as strong a line as I think I can get away with so as not to break off fish, leaving a hook or lure in their mouth.  LOVE a good, drag ripping fight!

I will say this, however; sometimes you need to get a fish out of cover quickly in order not to be broken off.

that's what i do when i hook up on a swimbait fish , reel em in as fast as possible so the fish doesn't throw the bait . as a matter of fact i do that with most fish besides spinning/finesse situations , winding them in is not all that to me , if it was i would be on a tuna charter boat !! the anticipation of the bite and the bite is all that thrills me ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll play with little fish, but if it's a big fish or a tournament, I'm skiing them in if at all possible. Same goes for swimbait fishing. If I hook a fish on a big bait, they need to get to the boat as quickly as possible because there is so much leverage to be had from that big heavy bait. Play around with a swimbait fish, and it will almost always shake off. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can lock the drag down and horse them to the boat, and in certain situations that's what you'll do. You will lose some fish that way though, ones that you didn't hook as well, skin hooked, or hooked in a soft part of the mouth. It's not terribly hard to rip a hook out, and at least for me, tend to be the fish I kick myself for loosing. Not because they're always big, but if you played them a little better or didn't pull so hard, that one would have been in the boat. I feel like when you use big heavy baits you're better off trying to get them in quickly as well as when you're fishing in heavy cover. If it's more of an open water situation, with lighter baits, I feel you land more if you take it easy on them. Just my 2 cents though and what works for me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you point the rod at the fish the stress on the rod will be zero.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×