Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I was just given a brand new pinnical 7bb bait caster and its spooled with new power pro. I seen mention I shouldn't use braid being new to bait casters. what issues will this cause me? I used one this past weekend with mono and didn't have many issues accept when the spool tension decided to loosen all the way up and give me bad backlash. this reels going on a med/heavy lightning rod. I don't do much "slop" fishing which I see is the reason to use braid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First line I used with my baitcaster was braid and I love it. Don't have any problems. As far as advice while using it, don't cast too hard and make sure it's at least 30lb braid. That's the lowest I've used on a baitcaster. Sufix 832 equivalent 8lb mono diameter. You can check equivalent diameters on TW. One caution is that the line may dig into the spool after a snag. This could potentially cause backlashes. As long as you're careful with it, you shouldn't have a problem. Good luck. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly I find braid backlashes much easier to deal with so I say fish away! 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1

 

Go braid!

 

Easier to fix backlash as MassYak said.

 

I have a harder time learning with Trilene!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Braid can be a great way to learn.  I would recommend 50 or 65 as the thin stuff is much easier to backlash and a lot harder to get out.  Use reasonable weights 3/8ths or more combined weight and you should have limited or no issues.  Setting up the reel real tight to begin with and then loosen it up as you go.  The spool tension set to controlled fall on the bait and the breaking at or near max.  Slowly  dial back the breaks until your good at about 50 percent with no backlashes and then slowly loosen the spool tension until your using it to eliminate spool slop.  This process may take you months or years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started with 50# braid it wasn't bad. I also expermented with Big Game mono when I was learning. The braid is easier to get a backlash out generally but the mono is a excellent choice if you're having a tough time learning and braid is backlashing so much you cutting them out. Mono is easier on the wallet. 

 

I found that keeping your lure weight in the middle to upper limits of your rod specs really helped as much as line choice to prevent rookie backlashes at bay. 

Also starting out with a rollcast was beneficial as well. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

19 hours ago, ohihunter2014 said:

I seen mention I shouldn't use braid being new to bait casters. what issues will this cause me?

 

I think the reason that was mentioned is due to the fact that braid is expensive line and novice baitcasting reel users are at higher risk of ruining a new spool of line due to backlash.  Most guys will recommend practicing with cheap mono before making the switch.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that learning slowly with braid is way easier than damaging line with mono and having to cut line off the spool or dealing with a ton of memory.  I would suggest learning on at least 30lb braid, but preferably larger because it's less likely to dig into the spool.  Removing a backlash requires patience, but will very rarely damage braid.  I might suggest you also look up the tape trick for baitcasters either on here, YouTube, etc.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This reel was setup by a tournament guy. I'm sure it's got 40-50lb power pro on it cause it's what he uses. I didn't have a bad time getting suffix elite backlashes out. I figured braid would be more of a pain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

20 lb braid is a nightmare to undo, and i would never recommend it for a beginner.  with the larger braid if you take your time you can get it out even if you have to take out the spool.  The knots are larger and much easier to deal with.  You may want to bring a knitting hook or scribe to help undo some of the knots.  I would recommend against using a hook as some have cutting points which will damage the line and if you go to far the barb is a major ptia....

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be great to gain additional casting distance with say a #20 lb. PP braid - but how guys can use that with success on a BC reel is beyond me ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not for beginners maybe but 20# PP or Suffix is on all my rods. At least those that don't have 50 or 65 on them.

 

Practice will make closer to perfect. I still screw up from time to time but I think braid is worth it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd just spool up with a fresh batch of good fluorocarbon and leave all these bad braid issues posted above, behind...who needs the hassles?

 

:P :lol: :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd suggest keeping the braid and walking off maybe

50-60 feet (more or less depending on your casting

distance) and then tape off the spool with electrical

tape.

 

This way your backlash is only the distance you cast

and you won't have to deal with a massive nest.

 

20# is what I use and it is not a problem. As I have

said multiple times, one just has to be aware of 

the potential of dig-in after a hard fight, a strong

snag/pull. Just pull of several yards of line prior to

next cast to ensure the line isn't dug in... 

 

Basically habit for me, so I only nest on too much

whip with too light a bait, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Darren. said:

I'd suggest keeping the braid and walking off maybe

50-60 feet (more or less depending on your casting

distance) and then tape off the spool with electrical

tape.

 

This way your backlash is only the distance you cast

and you won't have to deal with a massive nest.

 

Bingo.  Probably the easiest way for a beginner to get the feel.  

 

As as for the posts about mono/FC - if you can show me a line that handles as well as braid (no memory, no stretch, resilience to kinks/knots, and super limp) I'll suggest it for beginners.  Until then, 30-40lb braid is the best handling stuff I know of.  I wish I learned to use casting reels on braid.  I would have cursed much, much less. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Another vote for braid.

 

Roger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I a, in the same boat and have 2 loaded with 20 and 30 lb.

Been practicing in the backyard and patience is rewarded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your new to baitcaster and want braid on it, get 50lb minimum. It just makes the learning process a little easier. I use 65lb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every baitcaster I own with the exception of two has 20lb seagar smackdown spooled to it. I never no issues ever. The other two are 60lb braid, and tatsu for deep cranking. I even med and shallow crank with braid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing forum

    fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing poles

    fishing

    fishing reels

    fishing poles

    fishing

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×
×
  • Create New...