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ct418

Help me grow some hogs!!

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Here's the deal, I recently bought a farm.  There was an existing pond on the farm that I have attached a picture of.  It is roughly 1/4 of an acre.  We also just finished the process of building a pond that is about 1/3 of an acre.  The existing pond that I have attached a picture of is the one that I want to grow some monster largemouth in.  Let me start by saying the previous owners stated that there were no fish in the pond that they knew of and I have fished this pond a few times without getting any bites. However, there are an absolute TON of frogs.  I am not exaggerating there are probably 300 frogs around this pond and on the lilly pads.  I wanted to start on these forums where there are several people who probably have more experience than I do in this category.  I will admit that I am a newbie when it comes to growing and maintaining a fish habitat. I have always fished and when I saw this pond my eyes lit up.  I want monsters!! I have access to heavy equipment if you guys feel that cleaning the pond is necessary.  If someone could start at step 1 and tell me the best approach to growing monsters it would be much appreciated.  Do I put a small number of largemouth in the pond with a ton of small fish to eat, or do I load it down with both?  We have a hatchery where I can buy bass anywhere from 3-10 inches long.  I also realize I could just catch some big ones and put them in there and I wouldnt mind doing that.  However, I like the idea of growing them!! Please give me feedback and advice on where to start!! Thanks all!!

 

IMG_3491_zpsg5qwiux9.jpg

 

 

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Check out the Pond Boss, Google it, it'll answer every question you have about ponds/fish

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Contact a professional who can analyze the ponds habitat - water quality, depth and available forage. No one here can give you any advice without knowing what you have to work with.

 

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38 minutes ago, ct418 said:

Ok, I will check that out. But please, if anyone has any advice on here please let me know. 

 

Thanks for the reply

 

We did ;)

 

 

44 minutes ago, Brayberry said:

Check out the Pond Boss, Google it, it'll answer every question you have about ponds/fish

 

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Every pond is different. There isn't a "One size fits all", answer to the question. You'll probably need someone to come out and do some test on the water, and sample the fish and forage from the pond to see if the food chain and fish are healthy. Check with your states DNR, some of them will do a lot of that for free or a small fee. Local colleges are a good option too. Their biology classes might be willing to come out and do some test as a learning experience and you get the information you need to make your pond better. 

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I'd get a forage established first. Bluegill and/or perch. Then add adult largemouth. Like at least 

16-20"+ . The bigger the better, because genetics play a roll in the size of a bass. Water conditions and forage availability are main factors but even with an abundance of forage doesn't mean you will grow "monster" bass ; you need the proper Gene pool.

 

Another thing to consider is you don't have much room for a bunch of "monsters" . Put too many in there and you'll end up with big headed skinny bass . 

 

At 1/4 acre these fish will be like your pets . 

 

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Where are you geographically and as far as climate? If the pond freezes over winterkill can be a big issue if it's not just the right depth. Same with temperature and oxygen levels...

If there are no fish in there now, there is probably a reason. A relative of mine excavated a 10' deep 1/3 acre pond on his farm a few years ago and in the first summer green sunfish had naturally appeared, migrated in as fish eggs stuck to birds' legs most likely. The point is, it might be futile to put bass in if the pond isn't the right size. 

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start by buying yourself a simple ph test kit, over a few days preferably sunny test the ph at least 3 times a day at the same time (first light, midday and nightfall) for a few days and see if there are major fluctuations in ph which directly relates to dissolved oxygen/carbon dioxide levels.

the presence of large numbers of frogs is usually a good indicator of water quality.

don't clean it the vegetation provides oxygen to the water and removes excessive nutrients.

keep the bass numbers low and make sure they have ample food supply

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The Missouri conservation dept starts out by adding bluegill and channel cats to a new pond then a year or two later they add bass . Like Yeajray231 said , its probably a good idea to get forage started  first .

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Bob Lusk is the Pond Boss to contact.

Every body of water is different having a unique carrying capacity. Your pond looks good from the surface and shore vegetation, have no idea how deep it is or what the bottom is like. Very surprised there isn't any fish species keeping the water free of mosquitos, just frogs that can live in polluted water. You want to add habitate to the new pond and stock it!

Tom

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If you've got a hatchery up the road, give them a call and see if they offer a pond management program. They will come out and zap the pond with an electric shock in a few places and get a good count of any fish that are naturally in the pond whether you can catch them or not (this is a lot like fishing with M-80's, they flat to the top, stunned, and after a few minutes they swim away unharmed). They will also know the best ratio of bass-panfish-catfish for your particular area. Be wary of stocking yourself, as you want to avoid invasive species. That 40 lb flathead might seem like it will be fun to catch again but it will eat all your bass in the meantime, same with MANY other species.  

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Dump some snake head in there and call it done, ?

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Welcome aboard! No pond experience, but darn

sure wish I had my own! :) 

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Theres plenty of ponds under 1 acre that have + 5 pound bass in them.Keep the bass feed, check the water quality often, add some structure for the fish, and watch your bass grow to hawgs.

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