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Just a little reminder.  The heat index here in Virginia is supposed to be 105-110 for the next few days and through the weekend. I guarantee you that it isn't a dry heat either!!   For those that may not be used to those types of temps, it's a good idea to be very careful.  Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke are nothing to mess around with. Hydrate and be aware of your condition at all times!!  

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, on average, over 600 people die from complications related to extreme heat each year in the United States - more than tornadoes, hurricanes, flooding, lightning or any other weather event combined.

Heat-related deaths and illnesses are preventable, but it’s important to identify the warning signs and to react swiftly and appropriately when they arise.

What’s the difference between heat exhaustion and heat stroke?

Heat exhaustion is the precursor to heatstroke and is a direct result of the body overheating.

According to Mayo Clinic, heat exhaustion is identifiable by heavy sweating, rapid pulse, dizziness, fatigue, cool, moist skin with goose bumps when in the heat, muscle cramps, nausea and headache.

These symptoms may develop over time or come on suddenly, especially during or following periods of prolonged exercise.

When heat exhaustion is not addressed, heatstroke can follow.

Heatstroke is the most severe heat-related illness and, without emergency treatment, it can lead to death. It results when your body temperature rises to 104 degrees Fahrenheit or higher.

"This is pretty complicated because a lot of things can happen. The short answer is it certainly can be fatal...," Peter Sananman, MD, assistant professor of emergency medicine at Penn Medicine, said.

At this temperature, your brain, heart, kidneys and muscles can also become damaged, leading to serious complications or death.

In the case of heatstroke, seeking medical attention is an absolute must, Sananman said.

In addition to a high body temperatures, the symptoms of heatstroke include altered mental state or behavior, nausea and vomiting, flushed skin, rapid breathing and racing heart rate.

"Generally with heat exhaustion, a patient is sweating a lot, whereas with heat stroke, they’ve stopped sweating and are actually dry. It’s a good rule of thumb but isn’t always true," he said.

 

 

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A timely reminder! We will have the same conditions here in Illinois. I wont be fishing.

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5 minutes ago, .ghoti. said:

A timely reminder! We will have the same conditions here in Illinois. I wont be fishing.

As will I.  I "can" fish in most all conditions but I choose to stay out of the elements this weekend.  I've had heat exhaustion from guiding multiple days in this kind of heat and it's not fun.  It also takes a log time to fully recover.  I have a vacation coming up in Wisconsin and I don't want to be battling the after effects of too much sun here at home!!  

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Being an old phart, I've had a lot of experiences. Heat stroke is one I do not care to repeat.

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No need to mention the heat at home, however....this is called an opportunity!

 

Honey, aren't you going fishing this weekend?  Nah, babe...I thought I'd knock out some of those honey-dos and spend a little time here with you (and the kids (if applicable.))

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Went out on Tuesday with one of my sons. Had a great time,

plenty of bass. They often ask me to take them in weather

like what we're experiencing here (SE VA) and I tell them it 

is just not smart to go out. Not enough areas to get into

shade, etc...

 

That said, I will probably go mountain biking! :) Plenty of 

water, and a cold stream to dip in at the end!! Oh yeah. 

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I find it strange that people on the water would ever get to this point.  I will jump in the water the fishing be dammed.  This is a very serious thing and having had severe heat issues before I just don't fight it and take a dip when the first signs come on.

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Nothing to fool around with as per the original post.

 

Better to give up a few days fishing and not end up in the hospital.

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Its been pretty gross up here this week.  A lot of people down south think that its always cold or snowing in Minnesota but truth be told it gets very humid at times in the summer here.  Dewpoints have been hovering around 70 most of this week, combined with temperatures near 90, the heat index is over 100.

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maxresdefault.thumb.jpg.04377b5633fd14aaa6163c05bdda1262.jpgStay safe!

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105* and it ain't a "dry heat".

 

:fart:

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18 hours ago, .ghoti. said:

A timely reminder! We will have the same conditions here in Illinois. I wont be fishing.

@roadwarrior has the same weather as we do.  But I would still rather be in Tennessee.  

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96 regular temp, 105-110 heat index, here in southern indiana. no outside activity for me. looks like I'll be putting masking tape up for the little ones room so I can paint this weekend. Yippee! Still better than a heat stroke though. 

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The heat index was 110 degrees this past Saturday where I was fishing in South Florida, I made it through by drinking lots of water and fishing under the shade of trees. The fishing was even hotter and I caught lots of big peacock bass and quality sized largemouths, so it was worth taking the high heat and extreme humidity.

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Yesterday the heat index approached 110* and is forecast to be hotter today!

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