Jump to content
leftcoastBASS

upgrading from tatula ct.. SV version or curado k or other?

Recommended Posts

I fish from the bank 95% of the time so generally only bring 1 setup. Currently using a tatula ct and the thing I really like about it is that I dont have to adjust brakes or spool tension at all for different lures. I plan on giving my tatula ct to my bro for christmas but I'm not sure what reel I should get myself. I was thinking of getting the tatula ct sv or even zillion sv but I dont like the reduced line capacity and I heard the sv spools reduce casting distance plus i rarely cast lures under 3/8 anyways so I dont know if the sv spool is beneficial. Or I was looking at the curado K but i'm worried I have to adjust spool tension every time I tie on a new lure

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have fished all of the above and they are all excellent reels.  There is an obvious step up in quality from the CT to the SV.  The reel feels more refined and solid.

 

With that being said I prefer the Curado K over them all.   They are a bit harder to calibrate but once you do they are amazing.  Very smooth and the casting distance is excellent, as with all of the others.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, npl_texas said:

I have fished all of the above and they are all excellent reels.  There is an obvious step up in quality from the CT to the SV.  The reel feels more refined and solid.

 

With that being said I prefer the Curado K over them all.   They are a bit harder to calibrate but once you do they are amazing.  Very smooth and the casting distance is excellent, as with all of the others.

 

 

How do you calibrate the curado k? Is it one of those reel where you have to set the spool tension perfectly so the lure falls slowly or like the tatula where you set it so the spool has a bit of play and leave it there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You just have to find the balance between the braking systems.  I have two of the internal brakes on and two off.  Then I adjust the spool tension to where the lure barely falls.  Then I make a cast and keep doing that until it feels like I'm going to backlash when I make a cast.  From there it's just fine tuned spool tension and external brake adjustments until you get it just how you like it.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having fished the Curado K and Tatula SV side by side, the K takes a little bit more in way of fine tuning. However distance, line capacity, and smoothness all come with both, but the K will give you more line. Between the two, flip a coin as you cannot go wrong. I love the K and SV. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Shimano Curado 200K is their next general reel incorporating the good stuff from the high end reels into a reel the average bass angler can afford. The big change is the gearing, high speed ratio available and 200 size line capacity in a more compact light weight design. Both Daiwa and Shimano reels cast very good, the 200K with it's micro gearing will be smoother on the retreive with less lure drag  and Daiwa can't duplicate that with thier current gear design. The 200K is a game changer for Shimano.

Comparing 100 size reels to a 200 size is questionable.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No experience with a CURADO K... with that said, you owe it to yourself to try a SV reel it’s a different animal than the CT. Wether it’s the Zillion or Tatula. They perform excellent from light finesse stuff to cranking 10XDs. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I say that sv. Can be had for 130 bucks. And it performs flawlessly for me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I own daiwa reels as well as a couple Shimano reels and I definitely prefer daiwa. shimano reels have they're place but I see them more as a cranking reel than an all around. I feel the tatulas are more of a work horse reel, the simple braking system makes them much more versatile. Personally I would go daiwa 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tat sv would be my pick despite the fact I have never used the K. I have 6 tats from the original, ct, ct R and sv. Love them all! Super simple to dial in and nearly impossible to backlash. Use them for everything from trolling for kokanee in lakes to salmon and steelhead in the rivers. Never have had a single issue with any of them.

Recently purchased a chronarch mgl and wish I had not.............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you’re comfortable with the braking on the Tatula Cat and happy it’s performance stick with that and get the Tatula SV or go Zillion SV if you want max distance. Spool capacity shouldnt be an issue with these reels unless you’re using 20lb mono and big baits. 

 

Im sure the Curado K is a great reel and you likely can’t make a bad choice here. But I have a bunch of Shimanos and one Tatula SV. The braking setup is definitely different, so far I have no problem transitioning back and forth between the two.   But for my next two reels I’m getting a couple Zillion SVs. If you’re really worried about having to make brake adjustments stick with the Daiwas. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flip a coin, whatever you are good. Don't worry about line capacity @14lb/100(SV)-110(200K)yds, you are good for any kind of bank fishing. They size both capacity and palm-ability are about the same. Even prices are not that much different.

I think it comes down to your preference between brand and type of breaking system. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Tatula CT and a Tatula SV.  The SV is more forgiving (my wife uses it a lot) and it is a dream to cast light stuff.  I can cast the CT much further and it is my preferred reel by far unless I'm throwing something weightless.  Both are excellent, easy to set up reels.  Both reels make my more expensive REVO SX seem like a rip off.  I can tell you I will buy several more CTs if that means anything.  

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/19/2017 at 2:35 PM, leftcoastBASS said:

I fish from the bank 95% of the time so generally only bring 1 setup. Currently using a tatula ct and the thing I really like about it is that I dont have to adjust brakes or spool tension at all for different lures.

 

I have two Tatula SVs, and they are the same way, at least until you approach lures at least 3/4. For anything under 3/4oz, I set the tension knob to the point where the spool begins to click and leave it alone. I don't have the same kind of experience with the Curado K, although I gather they're also a great reel and also have a great braking system, although they're not going to be quite as hands off.

 

The downside of the SVs is casting distance isn't quite as good as many other reels, but its not a signigicant amount and that's a small price to pay for the improved braking. Think about it this way, the extra ten casts you get while you'd otherwise be pulling out a bird's nest will more than make up for any shortages in casting distance.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After reading the comments I'm probably going for another Daiwa but now I'm unsure if i should get a Sv spool or just a plain old tatula ct. Is the sv spool worth it if the lightest thing i plan on casting is a weightless senko (3/8 i think) and how much does it reduce casting distance by? I know it reduces backlash but it's not really a problem for me unless i cast straight into a tree which I doubt any braking system can help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, leftcoastBASS said:

After reading the comments I'm probably going for another Daiwa but now I'm unsure if i should get a Sv spool or just a plain old tatula ct. Is the sv spool worth it if the lightest thing i plan on casting is a weightless senko (3/8 i think) and how much does it reduce casting distance by? I know it reduces backlash but it's not really a problem for me unless i cast straight into a tree which I doubt any braking system can help.

If you are looking at Tatula SV and throwing wacky rigged senko my opinion NO. A wacky 5"senko is in my top 3 of presentations and I have not been pleased with the distance. T rig senko I rarely toss and havent on a TatSV  but generally a T rig will cast a little farther.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, QUAKEnSHAKE said:

If you are looking at Tatula SV and throwing wacky rigged senko my opinion NO. A wacky 5"senko is in my top 3 of presentations and I have not been pleased with the distance. T rig senko I rarely toss and havent on a TatSV  but generally a T rig will cast a little farther.

I thought a sv spool would increase distance for lighter weights? Or is it just for reducing backlash  and make casting easier?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, leftcoastBASS said:

I thought a sv spool would increase distance for lighter weights? Or is it just for reducing backlash  and make casting easier?

With the TatSV Id say more control easier casting than finesse oriented. The TatSV spool isnt all that light plus holds a fair amount of line 2 things that arent good to have for lighter presentations. A senko though isnt a lightweight presentation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, leftcoastBASS said:

After reading the comments I'm probably going for another Daiwa but now I'm unsure if i should get a Sv spool or just a plain old tatula ct. Is the sv spool worth it if the lightest thing i plan on casting is a weightless senko (3/8 i think) and how much does it reduce casting distance by? I know it reduces backlash but it's not really a problem for me unless i cast straight into a tree which I doubt any braking system can help.

That's up to you, but I find 3/8 - 1/2oz still to be the sweet spot in the SV. I would say the decision is more about if you want a more forgiving reel that you will never birds nest, or a less forgiving reel that you can cast further and save a few bucks as well. To me, the advantages of the SV outweigh the disadvantages but I can't say I wouldn't be fine with a Tatula CT or a Curado either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only Zillion variant that shares the CT frame is the SV TW. All other Zillions are the larger original Tatula frame. 

 

With a 1/4 oz crankbait on the same rod and similar 12lb line my Tatula SV well outcast my Chronarch 51e and a Chronarch CI4+. But my Tatula SV has Hedgehog ZR spool bearings installed. All three reels have been properly tuned and cleaned by a pro. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎12‎/‎19‎/‎2017 at 1:35 PM, leftcoastBASS said:

I fish from the bank 95% of the time so generally only bring 1 setup. Currently using a tatula ct and the thing I really like about it is that I dont have to adjust brakes or spool tension at all for different lures. I plan on giving my tatula ct to my bro for christmas but I'm not sure what reel I should get myself. I was thinking of getting the tatula ct sv or even zillion sv but I dont like the reduced line capacity and I heard the sv spools reduce casting distance plus i rarely cast lures under 3/8 anyways so I dont know if the sv spool is beneficial. Or I was looking at the  curado K but i'm worried I have to adjust spool tension every time I tie on a new lure

I fish from shore 100% of the time except when visiting relation in Florida.  I can suggest a couple other reels since you asked if there were any others.  The Primmus Xi HS and the Okuma Helios Air.  I get excellent distance from both.  Do you fish right hand or left hand?  The Air sold for $270.  I can't believe ebay has a new LH for $109.13.  This is a lot less than I paid for either of mine, and I felt I got a good deal at that time.  I'd jump all over this deal except I not only have too many reels already, but took advantage of the TW closeout on the SV103 and have one on the way.  My first cast with the Helios Air amazed me.  I wasn't expecting that kind of distance from a reel I had never used before....especially on the 1st cast.

 

The Primmus has been a great reel for me.  Whenever I visit Florida I have to make minor adjustments to all my reels because my casting stroke goes from standing up with no obstacles to sitting in the front of a 14' dinghy where my backcast gets abbreviated to avoid catching my buddy...which causes problems until I can make adjustments....usually 3 days before I settle into the new stroke.  The Primmus is the only reel I never had to make an adjustment to.  I set brakes at 3 out of the box and set very loose spool tension.  Haven't needed to make an adjustment since then.

 

Both are very light reels at less than 6 oz.  Both launch a 3/8 oz. lure a good ways.  Pair either reel up with an Okuma Helios rod, and you will have a combo that weighs less than 10 oz. total.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    bass fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing rods

    fishing rods


    fishing rods

    fishing reels
    fishing gear

    Truck Caps

    fishing reels
    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×