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I would like to hear from the Bass Resource community opinions on braid to mono knots.  What you use now, what you tried and did not like and what just plain failed.I will be using 15-20-30lb power pro braid to 20-30-50lb mono on spinning reels in saltwater. Thanks in advance to the kind members that share there hard earned knowledge.

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For heavy lines and leaders the FG is the best because done right, it is the strongest and smallest of the line to leader knots.  The problem with it is that most people have trouble learning to do it right, and as a result they have a number of failures before they figure it out.

 

The easiest, most reliable, (probably most popular) hardest to screw up, line to leader knot is the double uni .  Search for a video (I posted one here just the other day) and you'll find it a piece of cake.  Just lube it as you set it.  Its only problem is that it gets pretty big with high test leaders.

 

Others will suggest other knots, but keep in mind that what works for some doesn't seem to work for others.  The FG  didn't work for me at first, and many other knots don't work for me ("don't work" means I get surprise failures with them. 

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I am basically an FG knot fan boy.  If you tie it correctly it is extremely strong.  The key is to really, I mean really cinch it down hard before you tie the finishing knots at the end.

 

Simply grabbing the main line in one hand and the leader in the other hand (like you'll see in most videos) isn't enough.  I tie the  end of my leader line to something that isn't going the move, and wrap some of my main line around a wooden spoon or screw driver handle and pull HARD, and hold.  

 

I take my time with it (usually at least 5 minutes), but when it's finished, a knot failure isn't something I even consider.  It almost never happens.  The only reason I ever retie on the same setup is because my leader gets too short, and I typically start with about 12 feet.

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For sure, an FG knot tests higher in breaking strength than most others. Its advantage is that it doesn't rely solely on friction like most knots where accurate wraps place line "skin to skin."

 

An FG is plaited, albeit without the usual definition of "3 or more" strands. But, what gives it its incredible strength is that each strand weaves in and out of the other. When you tie it properly, set it hard the way LionHeart describes, line material "bunches up" before each up and down weave of the lines through each other.

 

Analogy? Think of the difficulty one encounters slipping off a too tight ring from your finger. If it is stuck, what causes it to be so is not only friction, it is the bunching up of skin on your finger blocking the way from it coming off.

 

So, when you tie a good FG knot, it isn't just friction holding it together but these little bulging deformities in the lines, generally the softer line (mono).

 

I think of an FG as a bench knot to be tied the night before going out. On the water, I can tie a really, really good version of an Alberto or a Uni junction knot in about a minute or so, use these when I need to. Sitting in a kayak or canoe and tying an FG isn't my favorite thing to do. Great knot, for sure!

 

Brad

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On baitcasting gear I go with a FG knot, and if I break off it's usually at the lure.

 

On spinning gear, I go with a uni to uni, easier to tie and I don't have to worry about micro guides or passing through the line guide.

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 I like the J-Knot best except for micro guides. It's stronger than the Uni or Seaguar knots. Tried FG but never got fast enough to be able to use it efficiently on water.  

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Double uni for me, haven't had a failure since I was a greenhorn at joining different lines a couple decades back.  If it can hold up to an 18lb steelhead running 50yd+ down the river through undercut banks and logjams, I'm sure it'll hold up well to some measly old bass lol.  For the toothy critters, I use a 100lb fluoro leader and join it with an improved Albright knot.  Same kind the surf fishermen use with heavy leaders.  It's pretty dang tough.

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Only tie the FG

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RP/Royal Polaris knot, look it up.

This is the knot the salt water anglers use for your application.

Tom

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25 minutes ago, WRB said:

RP/Royal Polaris knot, look it up.

This is the knot the salt water anglers use for your application.

Tom

Tom, just another name for an Improved Albright knot. I tie it 9 away, 3 back and out.

 

Most knots have multiple names it seems. Anyway, of the "Alberto/Albright" sort.

 

I watched a video of a man on YouTube tying it, a Royal Polaris knot, 5 away and 5 back, but his hand technique was so bad I just can't believe an experienced angler would do it that way. I really need to put together a technique video!

 

Brad

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Very common discussion on the forum. My knots:

 

Uni-to-uni

Alberto/mod'd Albright

Shin's knot (current knot of choice)

 

And I never worry about any of the knots above.

100% confidence for fresh and salt water.

 

 

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46 minutes ago, Brad Reid said:

Tom, just another name for an Improved Albright knot. I tie it 9 away, 3 back and out.

 

Most knots have multiple names it seems. Anyway, of the "Alberto/Albright" sort.

 

I watched a video of a man on YouTube tying it, a Royal Polaris knot, 5 away and 5 back, but his hand technique was so bad I just can't believe an experienced angler would do it that way. I really need to put together a technique video!

 

Brad

The RP knot has been around since the 70's along with the San Diego Jam knot. I have been tieing the Indian knot now called Palomar knot since the mid 50's! 

You are right knots new names.

Tom

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Three best are a uni, a uni, or a uni.

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All the different knots mentioned here are plenty strong. I like FG the most because it's the thinnest and goes through guides best imo

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9 hours ago, fishtar said:

I will be using 15-20-30lb power pro braid to 20-30-50lb mono on spinning reels in saltwater. 

Forgive my ignorance since I fish zero saltwater, but is this normal? At least for bass fishing generally you want to get your main line (braid) as close in diameter as you can to your leader (mono). The diameter difference between 30lb braid and 50lb mono is massive and IMO would cause the connection knot to hang up on it's way out of and into the guides. If I ever had a reason to be running 50lb leaders I would be looking at at least 65lb or 80lb braid as the mainline. 

 

That said I've switched between a few connection knots the past few years. I started with the Uni to Uni, didn't quite trust it's strength after breaking off at the leader knot on a few hooksets so I learned the FG and didn't have any issues with it, other than that it's a bit of a pain to tie, especially on the water, and the ending half hitches would sometimes unravel. Then I switched to the albright/alberto and loved it, and still use it a lot. But didn't love the knot size for heavier lines for swimbaits so I have been using the blood knot recently (Matt Allen's knot of choice) and have loved it. I use it probably 80% of the time, while throwing in an FG or alberto every once in a while. Especially with smaller lines. 

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The blood knot is the oldest of all the line joining knots, how could it possibly be any good!

Tom

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Its the double uni for me.

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3 hours ago, WRB said:

The RP knot has been around since the 70's along with the San Diego Jam knot. I have been tieing the Indian knot now called Palomar knot since the mid 50's! 

You are right knots new names.

Tom

Tom, exactly.

 

And, I would hazard a guess that most of these knots were tied by seafaring fishermen literally thousands of years ago.

 

There appear to be about a half dozen "typical" knots . . . with about a hundred names attached to them.

 

Note, too, many fishing celebrities sort of name knots after themselves, maybe at most adding some minor "twist" to the way they tie it. A "Jimmy Houston knot" is essentially a San Diego Jam, for example.

 

*** A "uni" knot is "universal" abbreviated. Can't recall the exact story but an article appeared back in the 60s and an angler gave it this name. It had likely been around for millennia.

 

Brad

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2 hours ago, MassYak85 said:

Forgive my ignorance since I fish zero saltwater, but is this normal? At least for bass fishing generally you want to get your main line (braid) as close in diameter as you can to your leader (mono). The diameter difference between 30lb braid and 50lb mono is massive and IMO would cause the connection knot to hang up on it's way out of and into the guides. If I ever had a reason to be running 50lb leaders I would be looking at at least 65lb or 80lb braid as the mainline. 

In beach and pier fishing, this is called a shock leader.  Ideally, you want to use 10lb of breaking strength for every ounce of lead you are throwing.  Fishing under those circumstances, you're really muscling it out there to get distance and using too light a leader can cause you to lose your entire rig on the cast.  People casting that far use reels with a high line capacity as they are usually casting 150yd or more. 

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I don't tie leaders often but when I do I use the blood knot, mainly because it's the one I can tie well, super easy and I've never had a failure with it.

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FG when I tie at home and uni to uni when I'm on the water. Recently I had a  Florida Kayak fishing guide, Neil Taylor, that introduced me to his knot which is referred to as the Neil knot. Very small and easy. Just You Tube the Neil Knot for a 2 minute video. I figured if he pulls in sharks with that knot it's strong enough for me.

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15 hours ago, redmeansdistortion said:

In beach and pier fishing, this is called a shock leader.  Ideally, you want to use 10lb of breaking strength for every ounce of lead you are throwing.  Fishing under those circumstances, you're really muscling it out there to get distance and using too light a leader can cause you to lose your entire rig on the cast.  People casting that far use reels with a high line capacity as they are usually casting 150yd or more. 

I get the need for the big leader but why such thin braid for such heavy weights? 

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4 minutes ago, MassYak85 said:

I get the need for the big leader but why such thin braid for such heavy weights? 

It has to do with line capacity.  One of the more popular surf fishing reels is the Abu 6500 Rocket which holds 275yd of 14lb mono.  In the hands of an experienced caster, they can throw all the way down to the knot.  Depending on line thickness, a cast can be well past 200yd, and some can even go out past 300yd if their technique is spot on.

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18 hours ago, MassYak85 said:

Forgive my ignorance since I fish zero saltwater, but is this normal? At least for bass fishing generally you want to get your main line (braid) as close in diameter as you can to your leader (mono). The diameter difference between 30lb braid and 50lb mono is massive and IMO would cause the connection knot to hang up on it's way out of and into the guides. If I ever had a reason to be running 50lb leaders I would be looking at at least 65lb or 80lb braid as the mainline. 

 

 

I used the heavy mono leaders for abrasion resistance.  

50 & 65 lb braid is no match for Jagged jetty rocks almost completely covered up with razor like barnacles.

A 50 or 60 lb mono leader was essential.

I did use very heavy casting gear - distance wasn't always a concern but battling 40 lb plus stripers on the rock pile was as close to a good old fashion tug-a-war as one could hope for.  Stout tackle ruled. 

Good Times ~Miss those days.

5675d82e7595a_BigLinesider.thumb.jpg.018c0c1589c3dd123f6e6a0984c83952.jpg

:smiley:

A-Jay

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