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I have a Shimano Sedona spinning reel and find the location of the anti-reverse switch (on the underside) inconvenient. I'm looking for a good, comparably priced reel - especially an Okuma, Daiwa or Penn - with the switch on the side.  Any recommendations?

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The only Daiwa with a switch NOT on the bottom is the SS Tournament reel, which is a decades old design, and doesn't have instant anti-reverse. All Okuma reels are bottom switches.  Abu has mostly deleted the switch altogether.  I think you'll have difficulty finding any reel with a switch not on the bottom in any modern, instant anti-reverse reel.  The switch controls a spring that activates the one way roller bearing located just under the spinning rotor, therefore must be close to the spool.  The bottom is the most convenient place to locate the switch.  In the case of the Daiwa SS, the "dog-and-bone" anti reverse cog is on the main gear stack, under the handle, so the switch can located on the rear of the reel.

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Just for comparison, Pflueger and Mitchell also put the anti-reverse switch on the bottom as evidenced by my reels.

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Years back anti-reverse switches could be found on the back of spinning reels, my favorite location...

 

oe

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While I'm sure there is one what is a good reason for this switch anyway? Why would I want to just "let it go" as it were?

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24 minutes ago, pauldconyers said:

While I'm sure there is one what is a good reason for this switch anyway? Why would I want to just "let it go" as it were?

Beats me - I always have it turned on. The drag is what helps fight the fish, having the anti-reverse switch off would have the reel-handle smacking your fingers every time the fish took a run.

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Many people have never driven a manual transmission automobile either...

 

oe

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2 minutes ago, OkobojiEagle said:

Many people have never driven a manual transmission automobile either...

 

oe

Luckily I'm not one of those. My previous truck, WT-1500, which I had from '98 to '16 had a 5-on-the-floor. Prior to that, a Jeep Cherokee with a 4-on-the-floor.

 

Still see no need for the on-off switch for the anti-reverse...you see on on baitcasters?

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4 hours ago, pauldconyers said:

While I'm sure there is one what is a good reason for this switch anyway? Why would I want to just "let it go" as it were?

I'd rather control the amount of pressure being put on the fish than the drag do it. I can decide instantly, without messing with the drag while trying to fight a big fish, to add to take away pressure. If a fish makes a run at some cover, I can increase pressure to try to stop them. 

 

2 minutes ago, MN Fisher said:

Still see no need for the on-off switch for the anti-reverse...you see on on baitcasters?

Never had anything mechanical fail? That's why I backreel with spinning reels and release and thumb the spool with baitcasters. It puts all the control into my hands. 

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3 minutes ago, Bluebasser86 said:

That's why I backreel with spinning reels

Let me know how that goes after trying it on bonefish.

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2 minutes ago, MickD said:

 

Let me know how that goes after trying it on bonefish.

Not many bonefish in Kansas but I do it all the time with carp over 20lbs, wipers nearing double digits, catfish up to 50lbs, never had any problems. 

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I don't use spinning gear much but I always back reel when I do. I much prefer having the control over using the drag. It also makes it easy to get the line where you need it to make another cast.

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6 hours ago, Jrob78 said:

It also makes it easy to get the line where you need it to make another cast.

^^^^^^ This is a major benefit for someone that isn't completely focused (like me) when reeling in to cast out again; and occasionally reels the lure too close to the rod tip.

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Well, your drag is still operable and it depends on how tightly set your drag is as to whether it kicks in over an angler manually reeling line in and out.

 

Other than just the added control aspects, I can think of a few circumstances it comes in handy. In deeper water fishing vertically, if you see fish on your electronics, dropping down to them and bobbing the lure up and down and up and down is easier. While I have not done it, it makes me want to cast on top of some lily pads, drag a little Keitech weedless shad off the edge and use my switch to bob the plastic up and down after it falls. That'd seem more convenient than just opening the bail.

 

I need to try it more often, see where it helps, perfect the skill. On the most recent televised MLF competition, Mike Iaconelli can be seen back reeling while fighting a small mouth bass as I recall.

 

Mike can do that and yell, "giant!, giant!" at the very same time. Now, THAT is skill! I put that way ahead of walking and chewing gum.

 

Ha!  Brad

 

P.S. I really like Mike's antics and showmanship. Fun to watch for me.

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7 hours ago, Jrob78 said:

I don't use spinning gear much but I always back reel when I do. I much prefer having the control over using the drag. It also makes it easy to get the line where you need it to make another cast.

You have control over the drag, more or less with a quick turn. Same with getting the line where you need it when you cast. Loosen the drag and pull some line out, then tighten it back up.

 

I prefer the drag. Nothing like hearing it when hooking into a big fish that makes a run.

 

Too each his own though. I respect those that have mastered backreeling.

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catfish and carp are nothing like a bone with regards to back-reeling.  Wiper would be closer, but still, with the explosive speed of many saltwater fish, one just hangs on for the first few runs.  I don't think anyone could keep up and in control by back reeling.  Think of snagging a passing pickup truck.

 

I too like back reeling when it's practical and I'm capable of doing it.  My point was not to deny its utility with most fish, just a comment on its limits.

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35 minutes ago, MickD said:

I don't think anyone could keep up and in control by back reeling.

King salmon come to mind.  We use centrepin reels, which are just an arbor supported by bearings.  The only drag is your pinky and/or ring finger on the spool.  There would be no way to back reel them.  You can see the centrepin on the ground in this pic:

IMG_0024.jpg

 

20100228-FebSnow-06-X2.jpg

 

 

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15 hours ago, Bluebasser86 said:

I'd rather control the amount of pressure being put on the fish than the drag do it. I can decide instantly, without messing with the drag while trying to fight a big fish, to add to take away pressure. If a fish makes a run at some cover, I can increase pressure to try to stop them. 

 

Never had anything mechanical fail? That's why I backreel with spinning reels and release and thumb the spool with baitcasters. It puts all the control into my hands. 

I hear what you are saying, but in both cases I keep the drag set low and use my thumb/finger tip to add pressure.  I trust the drag to work but like to have manual control as well. 

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Backreeling aside, you need to look at the history of the spinning reel to ascertain function. Anti-reverse mechanisms were in place in the better spinning reels to hit the U.S. market mostly in the very early 1950s, but they were frequently referred to as "anti reverse locks." This was because their original function was to stop the reel/gears from going in reverse, especially in times of a strike. From what I can tell, most people fished with the lock off since that was what they were used to before the "lock" was incorporated (first in baitcasters). 

 

Also keep in mind there were no such things as self-centering bails, or infinite anti-reverse bearings, advancements that all came much later. Early baitcasters never had them either, and their addition to the baitcasters was considered an advancement so you didn't tear up your knuckles on hard hooksets. They also had the benefit of allowing fish to run freely before engaging the lock to set the hook when needed (a lot of live bait fishing back then). I'm guessing their incorporation in spinning reels just followed the trend of the baitcasters.

 

One could argue that they are no longer needed on modern reels with all the advancements, and most people probably wouldn't care, or even notice if they were gone. That said, I personally like that most reels still have them, as I frequently backreel and use the switch for other misc. functions.

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I'm a backreeler too. I like to set the drag to give slightly on a sweeping hook set, then backreel to play the fish. It's how I learned 30 yrs ago

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There seems to be a misconception that using a drag system and back-reeling are mutually exclusive.  Not so.  Both of these systems benefit the process when used together.  My drag is set pretty tightly; to slip only slightly with a full force hook set, that in itself depends on the power and action of the fishing rod.  The majority of fish in any given day never provide the need to go further than use the reel's drag when landing them.  An un-expectantly powerful fish hooked with light wire hooks and lighter line can overcome this drag setting and bend hooks, break line or thrash a wound in its mouth that releases the hook.  Being able to leave the drag setting constant but considerably lessen the pulling force during hard surges does a better job of protecting hook, line and flesh.

 

When the drag begins to slip during an extended fight, I flip the anti-reverse switch and back-reel during the surges.  When the fish's pulling force isn't over-coming the drag I hold the reel handle firm and let the drag work as usual.  If the fish is quicker than my ability to back-reel, the drag will give line while I'm working to keep up.  After the fish has sufficiently tired and is near the boat to be landed I flip the anti-reverse switch back on.  Back-reeling is not an either/or proposition.

 

Practicing this technique has allowed me to land far more powerful fish on lighter tackle than I would otherwise expect to.  I don't expect the majority of today's anglers to fall in step with me, as most use far more stout rods and heavier test lines than I do, but my light tackle helps to hook more and larger bass in my pressured lakes than I would without it.  I also am able to land the occasional surprise musky, pike, walleye, catfish and over-sized drum.  I don't care if you ever use the anti-reverse switch on your spinning reels, but please don't belittle my use of it and suggest the switch is un-necessary and should be eliminated from new models of spinning reels.

 

oe

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