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fishwizzard

Replacing the guides on a factory rod?

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I an old Wiebe-seat mbr 782c that I would like to have the guides replaced on.  The factory ones are pretty clunky and one of them is mismatched.  It’s doesn’t seem to affect anything but I cannot stop starting at it.  

 

My hope is that replacing the factory guides with something smaller and lighter will make the rod feel a bit more lively and balance more tip-up.   

 

How big of a project is this? 

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Not a big deal for an experienced builder.  Since this is, if I'm not mistaken, a pretty special rod, I would not recommend that an inexperienced person try it.  I think you want it done really well.

 

The system I'm using now on my casting rods is the Fuji with the RV 6 mm reverse two foot guide as the first guide, then single foot 5 or 5.5 mm KB's and KT's to the end.  It will cast very well and the guides are small, light, and unobtrusive.  I don't go smaller than 5's on a casting rod to keep open the possibility of using line to leader knots.

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Thanks for the input.  The more I read about it the more I realize that I am not up to doing it myself.   

 

 

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Guides are straight forward to replace, take your time. Replacing the tip top might give you trouble.

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There is a guy local to me that charges like $8 per guide.

 

Allen 

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I build custom rods and do guide replacements 8 dollars is very reasonable. You figure the cost of a guide and time and material to do it right.

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On 7/10/2019 at 7:41 AM, fishwizzard said:

Thanks for the input.  The more I read about it the more I realize that I am not up to doing it myself.   

 

 

Stick to that position.  That's too nice a rod to screw up.

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I have done this to a number of rods with much lighter guides and the rod is much more crisp in action.  I use Minima guides as they are the lightest on the market.

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Replacing guides is not a big deal. The guide placement and wrapping take some practice. Then comes the finish,  I used to build all my stand up saltwater rods. Had a special jig to wrap the guides and a motor to turn the rod for applying the epoxy and drying.

If you are only doing one rod take to shop to have professionally done , if you plan on doing more then one it is worth the investment.

Check out http://delawarevalleytackle.com/home one the site sponsors

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Don’t mean to jack your post but how big of a deal would it be to replace the reel seat.. I have an old falcon original and I was gonna do the same thing replace the guides but I would also like a little more “modern” reel seat

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6 hours ago, Fishaholic7lbs said:

Don’t mean to jack your post but how big of a deal would it be to replace the reel seat.. I have an old falcon original and I was gonna do the same thing replace the guides but I would also like a little more “modern” reel seat

Replacing the reel seat will require removing the guides. I have removed several old seats using a dremel tool with a cutoff disc. Slice down both sides of the seat. Then use a screwdriver to pry the seat apart. Be very careful, cutting as shallow as you can, making multiple passes. You do not want the cut into the blank.

 

I also removed one seat using a teapot. Rotate the seat in the steam whistling from the teapot. Water boils at 212°F. The steam temperature will be less than that(venturi effect). It takes 160-180°F to loosen the epoxy bonding the seat to the blank. It takes more than that harm the resin which holds the blank together.

 

I tried this after having a conversation about epoxy at a seminar. Tried if first on a broken rod. When that worked I tried on one of mine I wanted to rebuild. It took longer than cutting the seat off with a dremel, but I deemed it less likely to damage the blank.

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There is a way to replace the seat without removing the guides.  Remove the old seat then build up the blank with masking tape, three separate wraps evenly spaced under the seat location.  Vary the number of turns so that when you're done the three wraps (shims) present a cylindrical "surface" to glue to.  Make sure you totally encapsulate the tape so if water gets in it will not degrade your shims.  The seat can be slid into position from the rear.  

 

Regarding the ends, if you have a fore grip, keep it and locate the seat against it.  If none, you can do a foregrip using the shimming method described above.  Install a rear grip using the same method of shimming.  The cork pieces will have to have their bores enlarged, which can be a problem without the right tools.

 

Not a piece of cake, but it can be done.  It probably is easier than replacing 7-9 guides.  I would leave it alone and use it for a spare.  Buy a new rod which is exactly what you want.  You cannot have too many rods.

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I have replace seats as Mick has described, but I use a foam arbor instead.  I take measurements of the blank and ream the arbor to the specs.  Then, I slice through one side of the arbor lengthwise with a razor saw.  That allows it to expand enough to clear the larger butt.  Glue in place, then install the seat.

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Keep in mind the methods above are for standard seats. Window seats like the ACS with blank contact windows are fitted directly to the blank which definitely requires at least partial stripping of guides. Any route you take is labor intensive and can easily exceed the value of the rod. I usually only do this on high end blanks that are hard to replicate or rods with sentimental value. 

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You obviously have the cork or  wood centered reelseat, the more the other design. is something I'll more then real vent and used on the Edge casting rods. The older Loomis' were built with Pac Bay components every guide from back than were clunky by today's standards. If you want the guides in the same place go Mininas, little cleanup and cheap. The Fuji route will involve much money cleaning up than guide costs all higher.

Lastly, the old matt finish is very tender,  even alcohol removes it.

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