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share your kayak anchor trolley rigs


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These are larger than they look and super strong. Many uses. I use 3 on my docking tie up rope. One for the front boat cleat. One for the rear boat cleat. One in the middle of the rope. Allows for adjusting tension and length. Should work great for anchoring also.

 

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2 hours ago, flyfisher said:

You talking about for a kayak I take it?  I don't have pics but I have been using the yak attack leverlock basically since it came out and have zero complaints.  

Are the more expensive yaks tougher contracted plastic than the cheaper ones. The Pelican blitz was $ 429 Concerned about screws coming loose. 

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When I bought my Hobie Outback, the dealer offered to install the trolley for free, and purchasing the trolley came at a discount. So to me, this was a no-brainer, and I let them do it. It's the yak attack, I think it's called leverlok??? Idk. Works good. I add a carabiner to the triangle for fast connect and disconnect

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When I had my kayak I made my own out of bungee cording, worked great..  Where there were serious stress points, I used machine screws with nuts on the inside, for those with no acess to the inner walls, there are things like " well nuts" that do a great job of holding in blind holes.  Mine was used in inland lakes, ponds and secluded waterways, if I were in the ocean, mabey a better unit ...

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6 hours ago, biggin said:

Are the more expensive yaks tougher contracted plastic than the cheaper ones. The Pelican blitz was $ 429 Concerned about screws coming loose. 

Not sure to be honest but probably so.  You can always use a plate on the back or even a rivet or well nut too.  There are a lot of options out there if yo uare looking to make it more secure but I think you would be surprised at how much it can take without ripping free.  I personally would just go with the standard set up and if it rips out, then go ahead and reinforce it.

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Funny l have a well nut on my tumbler, l’ll give one a shot and see how it goes! Picked up toggle bolts. I need to add a access panel then l’ll be able to get inside to do anything else. Even with a secure connection up against plastic the handles turn a bit. Probably a good thing the pads on the handles turn a little, it takes the stress off the bolts and hull.

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I run an anchor line out of my front handle with a carabiner for the line.  I used 3/16" rivets for the clam cleat that holds the anchor line. 1/8" rivets pulled out.  I tried a trolley but it didn't work any better than the line out of the handle.  I only use a kayak for running water so the wind doesn't affect me.

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Guess I should have used rivets, yeah. The seat and foot rests are riveted, everything else is screws. I just didn't want to spend the money for a larger riveter. Even rivets don't totally secure. and nylon straps pivot. The handles pivot even with toggle bolts so I guess it's just as secure.

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Get a pop rivet tool and some aluminum pop rivets for kayaks.  And get some Marine Goop to seal the hole.  They hold a lot better than screws and, in if done right, better than well nuts.  They do take a bit of skill to get installed right.  If you need to replace one, you can drill it out and install a new one.  Being aluminum, they won't rust and are easy to drill out.  And they're sturdy enough to hold something like an anchor trolley.  If you need more strength, you're going to have to step up to SS bolts and a backing plate.  

 

If you need to move the location, you can either plug up the old hole with that Marine Goop or, better yet, plastic weld it.  

 

I just bought a pair of anchor trolley's of Amazon.  I don't know the brand, but I see them currently being sold under the brand H20.  The only problem I've had is the rope wants to fray and unravel.  But an overhand knot at the end fixes that problem.  

 

And be sure to pull that trolley rope tight when you install it.  Over time, it will stretch and slack out.  And a little bit of slack is fine.  But if you don't get it almost too tight at the beginning, you'll wind up having to retie it later.  

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1 hour ago, Bankc said:

And be sure to pull that trolley rope tight when you install it.  Over time, it will stretch and slack out

From the anchor weighing down on the guide O ring as you lower it or just from age ?

 

1 hour ago, Bankc said:

step up to SS bolts

All are except the toggle bolts for the added handles l put on. Thought about as l popped in the toggles. Once l add the access panel l can redo them.

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2 hours ago, biggin said:

From the anchor weighing down on the guide O ring as you lower it or just from age ?

A rope will just stretch out if it's kept under any tension.  It doesn't necessarily need the weight of the anchor, though that will speed up the process.  It'll eventually stabilize and quit stretching, once it's broken in.  It's just the fibers in the weaves of the rope readjusting their position.  It's not really an age thing, but a use thing.  

 

And while it's a good idea to use SS bolts and nuts on a kayak, it's not always necessary.  I have some bolts on mine that are black oxide steel (used on some black plastic parts so they blend in).  Theoretically, they'll rust pretty quickly.  But I've had them on there for years, and they're still fine.  Same with a few zinc coated steel bolts that I've used.  Anything below the water line that will get regularly submerged in water needs to be stainless steel or brass (if high strength isn't required).  If it's just occasionally getting damp, it doesn't HAVE to be stainless steel.  Just keep an eye on it, and if it becomes an issue, swap them out for stainless before they get too rusty to remove.  If it's a critical piece that can't fail or somewhere you won't often get a good look at, it's probably best to just go stainless to begin with, just in case.  

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I put Yak Gear kits on a couple different kayaks several years ago.  No issues, whatsoever.   I'm not sure if LeverLoc was available back then...it doesn't look familiar, so I have no comparison.  I'm sure DIY can be as good for less $$.  I am lazy and got exhausted by the variables and options of buying parts myself.  Kits was too easy.  I used rivets and marine Goop

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I have a Crescent Shoalie, Crescent Light tackle, and a Old town 120 sportsman, and really really dont want to drill holes in any of these kayaks, does anyone that has one of these kayaks have an anchor trolley system that doesnt require drilling into the kayak?

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37 minutes ago, MediumMouthBass said:

I have a Crescent Shoalie, Crescent Light tackle, and a Old town 120 sportsman, and really really dont want to drill holes in any of these kayaks, does anyone that has one of these kayaks have an anchor trolley system that doesnt require drilling into the kayak?

You can definitely tie to the front and rear grab loop.  After you use it for 5 minutes you'll be reaching for the drill.  I have anchor trolleys on either side of my pedal kayak (Old Town Predator PDL).  This isn't the best picture, but it shows.  This is the YakAttack one with the backing plate.  It is not the easiest install as I remember, but it works for a lot of anchoring options - pins and weighted anchors too.

IMG_20230620_155730_(1750_x_1313_pixel).jpg

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On 6/18/2023 at 8:11 AM, flyfisher said:

You talking about for a kayak I take it?  I don't have pics but I have been using the yak attack leverlock basically since it came out and have zero complaints.  

Same, I have that on mine and my kids. No issues with any of them.

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I use the YakAttack Trolley with an Anchor Wizard. I too used rivets and GOOP. I haven't had any issues with stretching that I know of. I use a 5lb rubber coated dumbbell that I found at WM for $3, or my homemade drag anchor for anchors.

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6 hours ago, ooga0341 said:

I use the YakAttack Trolley with an Anchor Wizard. I too used rivets and GOOP. I haven't had any issues with stretching that I know of. I use a 5lb rubber coated dumbbell that I found at WM for $3, or my homemade drag anchor for anchors.

I like that the cleat has a locking lever

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