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Quick Setting Epoxy Question


GReb

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I decided to replace a guide myself for the first time. The rod is a workhorse and I can’t wait weeks to have someone else fix it. Also (fortunately ?) I don’t care what it looks like as long as it holds. 
 

The wrapping went better than expected but I had some issues with the JB Weld 5 minute epoxy. It never fully hardened and although I did mix it I’m assuming I didn’t do so long enough. It was rubbery feeling. So I mixed up another batch really well and applied over the top just to see what would happen. The result was much better but it’s still not 100% hard. I think it’s probably best that I remove it all and reapply from the beginning. 
 

With that being said, is there a preferred quick setting epoxy for a quick fix? I’m really not impressed with the JB Weld. I have seen others mention Gorilla and Devcon. Will either provide a better finished product or is it all user error. I want the 2nd attempt to be the final one!

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If you just want it done and are going to rewrap it, then strip off the finish and old thread, rewrap new thread, and just use polyurethane varnish if you have some. It’s thinner to go on and will need more coats, but the first couple will dry in minutes and it’s more forgiving to put a bunch of thin coats on rather than one thick one. 
 

if you insist on epoxy, then get 1-hour epoxy instead of the 5 minute stuff.  Are sure you might a lot more than you think you need. Mistakes in not getting the right amount from each tube are minimized when you have more pushed out of the tube. 

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Sounds like inexact measurements, 50/50, or not mixing thoroughly. 
 

I don’t care for 5 minute epoxy either, any brand. It works but it’s not real strong. 

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  • 1 month later...

I've used JB weld on rod guides wrap. It is not always consistent, sometimes to get good results you might have to be lucky.  One rod I coated the ferrule wrap with JB weld epoxy and it turned out great, it was as perfect and smooth and hard as the real thing. 

 

Make sure to mix really well and thoroughly. Make sure you as equal amounts of hardener and resin as possible.  Don't use heat and you will have longer working time. Bubbles is a side effect, a price to pay for longer working time. Use heat and it will set much too soon. Rotate the rod to level the epoxy while it cures. The warmer environment you do this in, the better. 

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Use epoxy designed for guide wraps.  It's not an adhesive like hardware store epoxy, it's a casting resin.  Most of them cure overnight to fishable strength and they are clear, durable.  Mix it for 2 minutes, measure it with syringes.  It doesn't dry, it cures by chemical reaction , so each molecule of hardener has to find a molecule of resin.  so it has to be measured accurately.  

 

Yes it can be done by eye, by approximation, but sooner or later you will have a failure.  

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Thanks for the replies. I ended up putting a 2nd coat of the JB weld on and it set much better. Still not sure I’d go this route again but the guide is snug.
 

I think my problem the first time was a mixing issue and not necessarily from me not mixing it well but rather just not having enough of the two parts to create the right blend like mentioned above. 

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I've used Sally Hanson too, and it's a pretty good product in a pinch, especially for repairs when one doesn't have the right tools, materials, or location to do it the way he would like.  Good stuff to have with you on a fishing trip. 

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When mixing wrap epoxy, or any two part material, here are some tips:

-  Thoroughly mix it, dragging it together in all directions, working to scrape it towards the center.

-  For wrap epoxy I count to 150 seconds before stopping

-  When taking it out, take it from the center.  Any poorly mixed material will be at the edges.

-  Blow the container you will use to clear any collected dust, and be sure it's a clean container.  Some use a new piece of foil every time.

-  Clear bubbles at the container by gently blowing the surface through a straw.  

-  Clear bubbles at the rod by passing THE SIDE of a butane lighter flame by the whole area of the epoxy while rotating the rod.  Don't put the flame under the rod.

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  • 2 weeks later...

@spoonplugger1 @MickD

 

@Alex from GA

 

I just want to make sure I'm understanding correctly, you've used nail polish harder to successfully hold a guide in place?

 

Alex mentioned epoxying over asap - but how long could one get away with Sally?

 

Is polyurethane the same as permagloss? Doesnt that require more than adequate ventilation or a ventilator? Like not okay in my air tight basement with no windows?

 

Been a while since I hit the rod building threads, I missed you guys haha

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Sally Hensen is recommended for repairs, not a substitute for wrap epoxy.  It is stated that it has UV stability, but it has not been tested for this application as has all the wrap epoxies.  Best to use materials designed specifically for the job. 

 

It is unlikely that Sally Hensen would hold a guide in place by itself.  The guide should be wrapped and Sally Hensen used to protect the thread.  Then when one gets the time the guide should be rewrapped and finished with guide wrap epoxy.

 

I don't think polyurethane is the same as Permagloss; it certainly doesn't have the same strong odor and doesn't dry as quickly.  Yes, Permagloss should be used only with very good ventilation.  Permagloss and polyurethane will not provide the deep, heavy, coating that epoxy gives, and will take multiple coats to get much of any build at all.  However, Permagloss has the advantage of being very tough, flexible, and it never darkens with sunlight making it good for lighter colors where the darkening of epoxy shows up.  

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11 hours ago, Kites R4 Skyfishing said:

I just want to make sure I'm understanding correctly, you've used nail polish harder to successfully hold a guide in place?

 

 

Alex mentioned epoxying over asap - but how long could one get away with Sally?

 

Is polyurethane the same as permagloss? Doesnt that require more than adequate ventilation or a ventilator? Like not okay in my air tight basement with no windows?

 

Been a while since I hit the rod building threads, I missed you guys haha

 

Mick answered most everything already.  You don't need any epoxy or coating to hold a guide in place.  Thread, dental floss, or kite string will all hold it there in a pinch.  It won't last long or look good but it will function.  The next step is a coating over the thread of some type.  Clear nail polish is a good one for an emergency.  It will protect the threads and last a good bit of time.  It will yellow and chip with light and abuse.  It won't be level or look pretty but it will work.  Actual rod finish is the best bet and will make it look like 'new'.

 

Permagloss is a type of urethane.  Its specially formulated for rod finishes rather than wood or other finishes.  When Ralph Quinn worked to formulate permagloss he priortized clarity, non yellowing, and durability with respect to putting it on fishing rods.  Like other urethanes it is solvent based (all urethanes are I think).  You should have good ventilation for all urethanes, especially if you have sensitive lungs (or skin) or other health issues.  Airtight basement is not a good idea.  Kitchen table with the stove hood fan isn't a bad choice.

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On 10/24/2023 at 9:32 PM, Kites R4 Skyfishing said:

I just want to make sure I'm understanding correctly, you've used nail polish harder to successfully hold a guide in place?

The problem with using nail polish permeates later.

 

The wife starts asking about her missing polish...you tell her you used it on a guide.

She comes down to the rod room to get the polish...then she notices you have acetone.
Now shes coming down (right while your putting finish on tread) and refills her nail polisher remover bottle.

Notices that you also have thread, razer blades, masking tape,  and various sized rulers.

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I'm more afraid of her seeing 15 untouched rods and 30 pounds of soft plastics and various tackle containers sprawled accross the basement filled with hard baits and terminal - I could lose a limb if she ever took a wrong turn heading into the playroom

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