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Chris

ok spinnerbait people question.

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Do you choose a spinnerbait by the shape of the head?

By the size of the wire?

By hook?

If the bait has a trailer keeper or not?

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I do look at the shape of the head. I also look at the length of the wire between the head and the hook. A short wire is the best for thick cover. I look at the profile and the size, color, and shape of the blades.

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I basically choose by weight and blade configuration. The other things you mentioned are important also but I tend to buy the makes and models which have produced for me for years. Stanley, Terminator, Strike King, etc...These models are designed the way I like so I choose by weight and blade combination for the conditions I'll likely be up against.

Example-3/8oz tandem willow is my bread and butter spinnerbait in the spring. I'll use single spins also but the tandem is the workhorse.

I swap blades and skirts so often that I don't care what the bait looks like when I buy it, as long as it's a tandem, in the desired weight I'm after.

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I go by weight first,then blades,then skirt color.....heads are not a real issue in my boat,99% of all the spinnerbaits I own are minnow heads.And if I need a different combination of blades and skirt,I'll change one or the other.....takes just a few seconds to get it right.

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Guest avid

I hesitate to call myself a spinnerbait person.  They are not a high confidence lure for me.

I choose based on weight, blade configuration, blade color, and company name.

My number 1 best producing spinnerbait is a 1/2 oz terminator with small silver colorado in front of a 4.5 gold willowleaf with a chart/white skirt. I then add a white split tail chatterbait type trailer.

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I just choose a bait based on blade size/configuration and weight.  There are two schools of thought on wire size, with one side stating a thinner wire produces more vibration (Hank Parker), and another side (KVD), that states a thicker wire sends more vibrations into the water by channeling the vibration vs. a thinner wire that absorbs the vibration.  I have had success with thicker wired baits like the Terminator's and War Eagle's, and thinner wired baits like Red River Tackle's and SOB's.  I generally fish stained/murky water here in Oklahoma, and throw spinnerbaits mainly in the early spring.  Red River Tackle's spinnerbait with the flo red kicker blade has just slaughtered fish for me, and been the lone bait I catch fish on at times.  Spots tear this bait up, and I took third in our February club tournament with a 14.7lb, 5 bass limit of spots.

IMG_0215.jpg

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I'm also not a spinnerbait person I guess but when I do buy them I look at swivel quality, blade configuration and weight mostly. I do my best to ascertain paint quality but thats hard to tell sometimes.  I also look at head design as I like a bait with an eye. I'm sure it matters less to the fish than me but the realism gives me confidence in the bait.

Most of my luck with spinnerbaits has come in muddy water. My most thrown is a 3/8 oz firetiger with gold tandem blades. I also throw an all red 3/8 oz with a single colorado blade.

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I am a spinnerbait fan as they have served me well over the years and some of my biggest fish have been caught while throwing this bait. I chose the application or venue I will be fishing first. The water color and structure I am fishing lets me decide on the type of blades I will use. Murky to muddy water and night time is time for a Indiana or Colorado style blade. This gives more vibration and water displacement and zones in on a basses lateral line. If I am fishing wood I like a slightly larger--no. 4 or so willowleaf blade to give my bait some rise when coming through the branches. If I feel I am getting slightly hung up I just raise my rod somewhat to "lift" my lure across the barrier. I choose smaller willowleaf or indiana blades for fishing in the heavy grass or if I want to " burn it ". Most of my smallmouth fishing is done in fast water and I tend to use a small willowleaf for less resistance against the flow. I tend to use 1/4 to 3/8 in water 4' or less and move up to 1/2 to 3/4 in water that is in the 4' to 10' range. I use heavy 1oz-1 1/2oz on deep drop offs, channels, and points usually in early prespawn and mid to late summer. The only time I do not use a trailer hook is when fishing wood , as in, fallen trees or heavy trash. I use a trailer practically all the time other than this instance. Spinnerbaits are a reaction bait so I do not go overboard on colors. If there are shad I like a white with blue glimmer. If there are perch and bluegills I might use a chartruese,white,black mix. I do use black at night and early morning or late evening from time to time and it can really be a good color pitching under docks and duck blinds as well. I don't think the question of light wire vs heavy wire has ever truly been answered as to the vibration action it lends your baits. I am sure there is information and opinions out there if you wanted to get scientific about it but, I like to keep my fishing fairly simple. I always felt that the blade confiquration took care of the vibration aspect. My opinion is use good spinnerbaits made with quality stainless steel or titanium. The main thing is to keep them " tuned ". Keep the blades in line with your hook. Also, I use a short armed spinnerbait when I occasionally use a spinnerbait with a flipping technique or a free fall technique on the outside of deeper grassbeds. I use mostly gold blades and switch to nickel if the sun is bright and is getting high. For smallmouth I like to use a chartruese blade simply because they seem to like that color. I read in a above post about having a smaller kicker in flo. red. I use these as well in discolored water and they work great. Most of my personal baits are made by Bigmouth Spinnerbaits---www.bigmouthlures.com,Wareagle---www.wareaglelures.com. I also like to keep plenty of blades and skirts on hand to customize  and adapt. Good luck.

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A sharp hook is a must,but on spinnerbaits I look for a light wire.I'll end up changing blades and skirts anyway.

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I choose by:

weight

wire diam and length

quality of swivel

quality of blades

type of blades

color of blades

skirt type and color

hook quality

shape of the head is not an issue for me

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as far as you guys that say you pick baits first by weight, is that because you will change the blades regardless?  when im picking a spinnerbait to use what blade configuration is usually my first order of business and everything else is second.  just curious?

im not a real spinnerbait guy so i usually just by terminators because ive had success with them and they seem to me to require less tuning.

matt

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I like round or wide on the bottom for largies and target fishing you can get the blades turning but keep the spinnerbait from moving to far better than minnowhead.

I like the minnowhead for smallies because you can remove some of the skirt untill you get speed control and have more skirt left than round head.

I up my wieght to decrease blade size. So I take rubbercore add 1/8 to a 3/8 have my smaller blades and 1/2.

My best spinnerbait is Nichols and it's round head but has a steelblade,brass blade combination.

I was surprized when I went KVD talk that most of what I was doing he talked about. I was aware that some spinnerbaits were better than others. The thing he talked about was the blades hitting each other.

When I got home and check my best spinnerbaits had this quality.

And strikeking is next but they don't have the steel,brass combination of Nichols.

Both of these are thicker wire spinnerbaits that I bend to tune for smalies or largies I use no titantmen.

Garnet

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i agree with avid i am not really a spinner bait bait person but i do throw them from time time. I usually buy them depending on weight, and blade size/ configuration, and lenght of the wire

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I'm definitely not a spinnerbait person, and use them less-and-less.

About the only time I might reach for a spinner is in muddy water during spring or fall.

Since I only use them in muddy water I use nothing but a large single Colorado blade,

either 1/4 oz or 1/2 oz in chartreuse & white with 6 features:

> Single Gold Colorado

> Long arm

> Ball bearing swivel (no barrel-swivel)

> R-Bend eyelet (no looped eye)

> Silicone skirt

> Bullet-nosed head

The BPS Lazer Eye fills the bill

Roger

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Maybe a new line of spinnerbaits

Like Chris Custom Baits

I know he ll do fine , his knowledge in spinnerbaits its outstanding ,he helped me in the past a lot, a guy I respect!!!!!!

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A spinnerbait company wanted me to come up with a new design concept.

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Yes I'm a spinnerbait guy. Another thing I look for is separte frame for colardo blades most just stick colarado blades on a willow blade frame and the balance is just junk.

Garnet

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Hey Natural that looks real familiar.  

Chris

I judge it same as Vyron

I dont throw trailers on my spinnerbaits that often.

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I was surprized when I went KVD talk that most of what I was doing he talked about. I was aware that some spinnerbaits were better than others. The thing he talked about was the blades hitting each other.

When I got home and check my best spinnerbaits had this quality.

Garnet

Just for clarification, are you saying that, if the blades hit each other that is a good thing?

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My main considerations are weight, blade configuration, blade color, and skirt color.  I am not an angler who believes in counting the strands of each color added to my skirt so that I get what I think is the perfect color.  I like to use the following skirt colors:  (1)white, (2)chartreuse, (3)black mainly at night, (4)white and chartreuse in an approximately equal number of strands, and (5)White and light green.  I use the typical copper blades in murky water and nickel in clear.  My blade selections are typical as well.  I like two Colorado's when I need vibration in murky water, or I want to fish my spinnerbait slowly and keep it in the upper part of the water column.  I love twin willowleafs in the spring and the fall, and I also like one willowleaft behind an Indiana or a Colorado when I'm pumping the spinnerbait up and down through cover and letting it hit bottom.  I catch a lot of good fish on spinnerbaits, but I keep my selection of components fairly simple compared to some.  

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If you pickup a strikeking willow and pull the blades strait you will see that theres a slight interference with the blades. Also Nicholes they add the metal-brass blade combo.

So when you hesitate your bait or hit something the blades run into each bang and crashing bouncing the skirt. Its a very powerful trigger.

Garnet

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Do you choose a spinnerbait by the shape of the head?

By the size of the wire?

By hook?

If the bait has a trailer keeper or not?

Some of that matters, if those conditions are seen.  

 I also select spinner baits on how much water they push, do I want lift in my bait or am I wanting to stay deep with my bait with proper blade selection.

Blades are one of the first things I consider with weather and water conditions.

Muddy, stained or clear, over cast, dark, or blue bird skies.  

I like baits that I can use Quick skirts on to make skirt changes on the fly.    Some of my skirts are already shortened, have been trimmed, some are full length, it depends on how the fish are hitting, time of the year, and visibility.

Any time a trailer can be used, I use one.

Wire types gives baits different vibrations.    Thin wired frame to heavy wire, or titanium frames all have different vibes in the water.      

Tweaking baits by changing to over sized blades also changes the vibes, so knowing what combo's do what is key to knowing how the changes are going to effect your customized bait.

When bait is being chased, I love throwing Quad shads, longer arm, with 4 blades.    Again, blade color or colors is based on weather and water conditions.

What a great bait when fry is near by.

Matt.

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