Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
scbassin

What is "High Sticking"

Recommended Posts

I know on high modulus thin wall blanks you should not exceed the line & lure rating because of the excellent chance of breaking the rod. I do not know what the term "high sticking" is. I broke a high modulus rod that was in the line & lure weight spec's but I was told I was high sticking. The company did replace the blank but never told me what high sticking was. Hopefully someone here can. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You were playing hockey with a fishing rod and tried an illegal cross check on a defenseman?  

Dunno.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe "high sticking" refers to taking the rod past the 45-60 degree angle while fighting a fish(or pulling on a snag,oops). This takes the rod past it's design "bend". I broke a 10 weight fly rod by trying to pull line off parallel with the rod with the reel's drag set at around 25%.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe one of our rod makers will have a better technical description, but in the mean time:

"High sticking" is raising the tip of the rod at an angle that creates maximum pressure at the apex of the bend. Instead of distributing the weight along the blank, it become concentrated in one spot, the "breaking point".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is basically a position the angler puts a rod in which the rod takes the full brunt of the opposing force of the fish and the pull of the angler.  Even the best rods when placed in these positions can break with as little as 2 lbs of force.

Imagine your rod tip pointing toward the sky vertically and let that be 90 deg. and parallel to the water as 0 deg.  The closer the rod gets to 90 degrees, less the angler takes advantage of a rod's ability to control and play a fish.  When you get to and pass 90 degrees, that's the high sticking zone.  The rod takes the full brunt. Sorry I can't explain it too well, but I will post an article that I did in the past about maximizing the use of a rod's power.  I try to do it later this afternoon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My $.02 worth....

"Highsticking" is holding the rod in a near vertical position, which results in very little pressure being applied to the fish, but a lot of pressure being applied to the tip of the rod. When "practiced," highsticking often results in a broken tip or rod, especially if it is made of graphite. The proper way to fight a fish is to get a bend in the rod but never let the rod raise much above your shoulders. Highsticking also encourages bass to jump out of the water, greatly increasing his chances of spitting your hook. JMHO.

Ronnie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't watch a lot of fishing shows, but of the ones I have seen, a fairly high percentage of them "high stick". Remember these are the same shows where they stand, with a fish in their hands, and BS for a couple minutes.

Anyway's, the most simplistic way I can state highsticking is, if the butt of your rod is closer to the hook/lure than the tip, your high sticking. Another way to put it is, if the line that is in the water, comes closer to the butt of your rod, than the length of your rod, then your high sticking. As an example, if you are using a 7 foot rod, and the fish moves around and the line between the tip and the fish comes closer than 7 feet to your rod handle, that's "high sticking".

Highsticking can be misleading. It imply's that you are raising the rod too high, but in fact, it's just as easy, if not easier, to get the same effect while sweeping the rod to the left or right.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't watch a lot of fishing shows, but of the ones I have seen, a fairly high percentage of them "high stick". Remember these are the same shows where they stand, with a fish in their hands, and BS for a couple minutes.

Anyway's, the most simplistic way I can state highsticking is, if the butt of your rod is closer to the hook/lure than the tip, your high sticking. Another way to put it is, if the line that is in the water, comes closer to the butt of your rod, than the length of your rod, then your high sticking. As an example, if you are using a 7 foot rod, and the fish moves around and the line between the tip and the fish comes closer than 7 feet to your rod handle, that's "high sticking".

Highsticking can be misleading. It imply's that you are raising the rod too high, but in fact, it's just as easy, if not easier, to get the same effect while sweeping the rod to the left or right.

I was just going to say, ever watch Bill Dance Outdoors?

Don't do what he does to land fish, unless it's catch 5lbrs out of a private pond.  Then by all means, have a day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW sorry Ronnie... :)

High-Sticking is:

Holding the rod at the extreme vertical position while fighting a fish.....

Imaging your holding your rod fighting a fish, then you raise the tip to the vertical position 90° to fight the fish, this puts an extreme stress point on the blank in the tips action taper, then having 3 to 4 guides wrapped in this section, will eventually cause a failure when the rod is high-sticked enough times. Another form of high sticking is when landing a fish, while holding the rod in-front of the reel seat or fore grip and raising the head of the fish to lip it. This can cause the same problems over time.

Just my .02¢

Tight Lines!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a term used when you are holding the rod in the high position with a wide grip. This applies when playing a fish under your tip, especially in deep water.

This overlod your tip and put a lot of pressure on the fish and this is the point of nearly max drag.

This term is used in sea jigging.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest muddy
I know on high modulus thin wall blanks you should not exceed the line & lure rating because of the excellent chance of breaking the rod. I do not know what the term "high sticking" is. I broke a high modulus rod that was in the line & lure weight spec's but I was told I was high sticking. The company did replace the blank but never told me what high sticking was. Hopefully someone here can. Thanks

THE OPPISITE OF LOW STICKING>>>>>>>DUHHHH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bill Dance gets away with it because lifting those big fish on TV looks cool!

If he breaks a rod, do you think he gets it replaced for free? ::)

8-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bill Dance gets away with it because lifting those big fish on TV looks cool!

If he breaks a rod, do you think he gets it replaced for free?   ::)

8-)

His never get to high stick more than two or three fish with a rod... between the ceiling fan and his tailgate and dock railings, few rods ever go on more than one trip.   ;D  The blooper tapes pay for more replacement rods than even he can break.  ...lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect the "working pros" have to pay for some of their gear, the stuff they "really use". ::)

Bill Dance, on the otherhand, probably doesn't have a thing he has had to purchase! In addition to all of his specific sponsors, I would guess his association with Bass Pro Shops provides him an unlimited equipment allowance.

8-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I think more than one of his sponsors are of the monetary variety, not equipment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

His never get to high stick more than two or three fish with a rod... between the ceiling fan and his tailgate and dock railings, few rods ever go on more than one trip.   Grin  The blooper tapes pay for more replacement rods than even he can break.  ...lol

Don't you think those accidents are really designed to keep you tuning in to see how he breaks the next one?   Sort of a trademark?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nope... I wouldn't take a draw tite on the shin for a blooper tape!  In most of those clips he has a second of shear terror (or real pain) on his face,

I think that for 20+ years of taping there haven't been that many bloopers.  I'm glad you don't have the last 20 years of tape on me!! ;D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I suspect the "working pros" have to pay for some of their gear, the stuff they "really use".   ::)

Bill Dance, on the otherhand, probably doesn't have a thing he has had to purchase! In addition to all of his specific sponsors, I would guess his association with Bass Pro Shops provides him an unlimited equipment allowance.

8-)

Yeah.  all those rods with his name on them.  (I keep thinking about that old Doritos commercial)  "Just keep breaking,  we'll make more."  

I can't imagine how little those rods actually cost to make.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank y'all for your excellent replies even though the thread got a little off track.

Muddy your answer was priceless I got a good laugh out of it.

Now my next question is did anyone gain some knowledge? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×