Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
surfer

Are there reels designed for braid?

Recommended Posts

Since braided line is so different than mono are there reels made for it. The first consideration that comes to my mind is can the spool be made smaller.  I use 10-lb braid for fishing open water and the reels typically hold too much of the stuff unless you use a backer.  But an oversized spool filled with backer just adds weight.  Would it be good to down size the reel?  For example the Shimano Stradic 1000FI specs say it holds 4/140 (equivalent 10lb-braid diameter) a max drag of 7.0lb and a weight of 7.4 ounces.  That's a saving of 2 ounces and some money.

Am I missing something here or is anyone else doing this already?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

to preface, I think you're talking about spinning reels maybe. If not, BPS makes a baitcast series called the nitro. It supposed to be a braid reel. the sales guy also said that it isn't full-price good. Maybe on sale.

If you were talking about spinning reels then I don't have anything to contribute and am an idiot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have a look at the new stella reels. They have cancelled the line/dia rating and the new braid rating has taken over!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry gang.  I was talking about spinning.  But I guess it wouldn't hurt to include casting since some of the same considerations could be made.  

What makes the TDX designed for braid?  Its specs say 140/12.  These are mono measurements.  In 12 lb braid it would hold 200yrds.  That's excessive and extra weight.  Same thing with the Stella; 16 LB/170 YDS.

I am glad to hear some reels are listing diameter/ yards on spools now, but Bass Pro only listed the Stella's lb/yrd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look for a reel that lays the line on criss cross instead of laying it flat..Years ago Mitchell made a reel for Spiderwire called the Spidercast..Some Wallyworlds still carry it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

surfer,

What makes the TDX designed for braid?  Its specs say 140/12.  These are mono measurements.  In 12 lb braid it would hold 200yrds.  That's excessive and extra weight.  Same thing with the Stella; 16 LB/170 YDS.
Daiwa crated the X using worm gear and main drive gear ratios so that the line carriage would stack the line on the spool in a wide X pattern. This was done to primarily stop the line from digging into it'self when being stacked onto the spool with heavy resistance...

Back in the 90's when the first braid (Kevlar) lines were introduced, there were baitcasting reels and spinning reels being produced to handle the way the line's were stacked onto the spools.

Just my .02¢

Tight Lines!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because braid doesn't compress like mono,  not as much will spool up on a reel.  Don't count on as much line going on as the spool says will go on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Since braided line is so different than mono are there reels made for it. The first consideration that comes to my mind is can the spool be made smaller. I use 10-lb braid for fishing open water and the reels typically hold too much of the stuff unless you use a backer. But an oversized spool filled with backer just adds weight. Would it be good to down size the reel? For example the Shimano Stradic 1000FI specs say it holds 4/140 (equivalent 10lb-braid diameter) a max drag of 7.0lb and a weight of 7.4 ounces. That's a saving of 2 ounces and some money.

Am I missing something here or is anyone else doing this already?

To answer your original question: Are there reels designed for braid?

Yes there are ...... but not in the domestic market, an example:

REVROS%202500.jpg

1000PGS.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That Revros is sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeettttt!!!! :;)

Looks a bit like my Capricorn...

It really is a sweet reel and fairly inexpensive ( about 80 dollars + shipping all the way from Japan ).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Darn Monkey , go away......... ::)

And if I keep telling you how sweet the Revros is the next thing you are going to find yourself doing is ordering one.  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So the main difference between a standard reel and a reel designed for braid is the laying of the line.  It is laid in a more exaggerated cross or X across itself to prevent spool dig in.  From what I understand the line laid in this crossed fashion should take up more room than when more traditionally laid.  Braid is also les comprisable than mono therefore takes up slightly more room than its mono diameter equivalent.  Between these two things a reduction in spool size is not warranted?  That was more of a mouthful than I intended.

I think I am going to have to measure and see how much 10 lb braid I am putting on my regular spools.  If it is excessive then I will have to look into the differences between downsizing, the Daiwa Revros, and the Shimano Biomaster.

How dose that Revros compare to the Tierra?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The quick answer to your question is that unless you are trying to win casting contests, yes you should be able to spool your superline on a 10, 100 or 1000 size spinning reel.  I've fished 10 lb. and lighter superlines on these sizes of reels for many years.

Now for my long answer: I wouldn't go to an UL because most of them don't have as finely tuned line winding (see below).  The 1000 size reels won't cast quite as far as a larger reel with the same line, but it still casts well further than mono on the larger reel would.  If max drag is important, that could be an issue as some reels in these smaller sizes don't hold their max drag throughout a long run (not usually a problem with bass, but inshore it can be).

Isn't it funny how some companies say faster oscillation (ie. greater cross wrap) will result in less line dig, while others say a slower oscillation (shimano) results in better line manageability?  In theory there's merit to both.  A fast oscillation will cross lines at a greater angle, but will also leave more space between each wrap.  A slow oscillation will pack the line more tightly, but at a smaller angle.  Personally I've found only a small probably insignificant tradeoff between one having an occasional "dig" and the other an occasional "throwing a loop".  Ive found what is critical is that the oscillation is even (very little or no hour glass shape), well centered and not too short for the spool (allowing lots of digging at the ends).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That Revros is sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeettttt!!!! :;)

Looks a bit like my Capricorn...

It really is a sweet reel and fairly inexpensive ( about 80 dollars + shipping all the way from Japan ).

I want one..................were do I go?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The quick answer to your question is that unless you are trying to win casting contests, yes you should be able to spool your superline on a 10, 100 or 1000 size spinning reel. I've fished 10 lb. and lighter superlines on these sizes of reels for many years.

Now for my long answer: I wouldn't go to an UL because most of them don't have as finely tuned line winding (see below). The 1000 size reels won't cast quite as far as a larger reel with the same line, but it still casts well further than mono on the larger reel would. If max drag is important, that could be an issue as some reels in these smaller sizes don't hold their max drag throughout a long run (not usually a problem with bass, but inshore it can be).

Isn't it funny how some companies say faster oscillation (ie. greater cross wrap) will result in less line dig, while others say a slower oscillation (shimano) results in better line manageability? In theory there's merit to both. A fast oscillation will cross lines at a greater angle, but will also leave more space between each wrap. A slow oscillation will pack the line more tightly, but at a smaller angle. Personally I've found only a small probably insignificant tradeoff between one having an occasional "dig" and the other an occasional "throwing a loop". Ive found what is critical is that the oscillation is even (very little or no hour glass shape), well centered and not too short for the spool (allowing lots of digging at the ends).

Very nice post, smallfry thumbsup.gif

Roger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks SmallFry.  I would not have thought of that.  It sounds like you have experience and have thought about this variety of equipment.  Your comment about "the oscillation being even, well centered, and not too short for the spool" sizes up a prior puzzle I had. I have one ultra light reel that oscillates off center.  Never thought much about it till now.

Are the three critical characteristics of oscillation pretty well taken care of in most reels or is it something you take the time to look for when purchasing? If so, how can you see it without spooling up line?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as I know, putting line on the reel is the only way to tell.  Once I get a reel home I'll return it if it doesn't look right.  However, unless you go to a very cheap reel or a non-major brand the chances are these items have been well addressed.  A buddy from Europe told me many stores there have a display reel with line on it for this very reason.  

Even lay -- These days just about every reel I can think of uses a modified "s" slider, a wormshaft, or some sort of eliptical system to provide relatively even line lay.  7 or 8 years ago this wasn't the case.

Well centered -- This is really just a matter of tolerances.  All the major brands seem to have it down pretty well, especially in their reels over $50 or so.  Some do provide extra "shim washers" for under the spool, but honestly I've never needed them.

not too short for spool -- Again, it seems most of the major brands seem to have this down pretty well, especially in reels over $50 or so.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So the main difference between a standard reel and a reel designed for braid is the laying of the line. It is laid in a more exaggerated cross or X across itself to prevent spool dig in.

How dose that Revros compare to the Tierra?

Nope, the main differences between a reel for braided line and a regular reel are the drag power and the spool depth, for example, the Tierra 2000 and the Revros 2004 have spools of the same size but the depth of is different, while the Tierra has a deep spool ( with small inner diameter ) the Revros has a shallow spool ( with large inner diameter ), translated this into the reel world it means for comparison:

Tierra: 90 yards of 10 pound test

Revros: 100 yards of the equivalent in braided line of 10 lb test monofilament.

Reels for braided line have lighter but more responsive drags to ease the pressure transfer from the line to the rod.

You can also notice another difference between a shallow spool reel and a deep spool reel when it comes to casting, you achieve more distance beacuse the line is spooled on a larger shallower surface vs a shorter deeper surface.

How does the Revros compare to the Tierra I can 't say, I don 't own a Tierra, but I do own a Theory, side by side they are the same size but mano a mano the Revros is a lot smoother than the Theory and casts a lot better than the Theory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another thing to consider is line retrieval rate. If you move down to a smaller reel, that could have a negative effect on both your presentations and your ability to fight big fish since you won't be able to retrieve line as quickly. IMO, you're better off using a normal-sized reel and just use a bunch of backing 8-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • fishing

    fishing forum

    fishing rods

    fishing reels

    fishing

    bass fish

    fish for bass
    fish

×