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burleytog

Just how much drag do you need?

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I need only 5.5 pounds of drag pressure. Most of my reels are capable of 8 or just a hair over with the exception of my Pixys. They come stock with 3.5 - 4 pounds of drag until I upgrade the drag stack, they are then capable of 5.5 - 6 pounds. I never understood why so many reels coming out now with higher drag ratings than the rod can handle. I imagine it would be very handy for slop fishing and getting fish out of thick cover faster, I can see that being helpful. I however can't see many rods lasting very long under such a heavy load especially when paired with heavy braid like 80 lb.

Take a cinder block and tie it to the end of your line after you have that 24 lb. of drag pressure cranked down on your reel. Now let the cinder block fall from about four feet and tell me what happens to your rod. ;)

(For the record, don't try this...your rod will break unless it's an Ugly Stick and then I'm not too sure.)

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I need about three pounds of drag, max.

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When i hook up into a nice FL hawg in the nasty cover i fish i need every bit of my Revos drag(or so it seems)!

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With light line and open water the fish can do whatever it wants.

When I'm using treble hooked baits (with the exception of jerks and spooks) I give the fish plenty of freedom because I don't want the trebles to tear holes.

If I'm fishing around cover and using braid I will usually have it cranked right down and just winch them in. No need to fight them if you don't have to.

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with open water......

i use the lightest possible, just to set the hook....

i love to hear it go zzzzzzzzzzzzzziiiinnnggggggggggg!!!!!!!!!!

If there is cover, well i reluctantly tighten it up......

then again, i don't fish for a living...

i fish for fun...

and fun to me = hearing the drag run!!!!! ;D

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I only need enough, nothing more and every reel I've ever owned has had more than enough.  I've never measured my drag settings with a scale.

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8 is plenty here.

I saw some dude with one of the flippin pitchin ardents and I wanted to apologize on behalf of whatever that he ended up with a set drag of 24 lbs. The line on it appeared to be maybe 12-17lbs. I cant see things working out very well for him.

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Maybe I should one day but I've never set drag with a scale. I know it's not set very high. I always use my thumb when I set the hook. Haven't had it happen often (not often enough anyway :'() use my thumb for added drag...

skillet

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I love my Revo drags do i need 24 lbs nope BUT if one day i do its there besides like others say all u need is 8 or so and the revo drag is smooth at 8 or 18. Askin about to much drag is like askin does this Cummins have to much torque..heres your sign

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with open water......

i use the lightest possible, just to set the hook....

i love to hear it go zzzzzzzzzzzzzziiiinnnggggggggggg!!!!!!!!!!

If there is cover, well i reluctantly tighten it up......

then again, i don't fish for a living...

i fish for fun...

and fun to me = hearing the drag run!!!!!

Nice to see someone that fishes like me. 15 minutes of experience will teach you how to set the drag by hand, scale, puleeze!

I use only spinning, medium 8-14 rod at best

I fish heavy weeds and high banked canals, anything under 7#

is no problem, over I just slide down and grab it.

I think television has played a huge part in teaching people how not to fish, 50# braid heavy equipment and just dragging then in fine for tournaments, but recreational ................learn how to play that fish, that's the fun.

IMO bass are one of the easier fish to catch, very abundent, hit on almost everything, a barbie spincaster has as much chance as $500 outfit. I love catching bass, but are they a real challange, not in my eyes. I also think catching 10# bass in waters that produce 15-20# is less of a big deal than catching a 6# in areas that produce only 8# tops.

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playing a fish to long builds up to many bad chemicals and increases the chance of death.better to get them in quick and release them.

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I need about three pounds of drag, max.

25 - 30% of the breaking strength of your line, within the suggested

guidelines for the rod. For example, 12 lb test line = drag setting of

3.0 - 3.6 lbs. The drag should initially be set with a scale until you

develop a "feel" for the setting. This can be done with a direct tie

or with a plastic grocery bag filled with free weights. If you use a bag,

gently lift it off the ground and set the drag as it barely begins

to release.

I quoted ghoti because he and I are on exactly the same page:

My drag settings are actually below guidelines. #6 Yo-Zuri Hybrid

is 11.9 lb test, my drag setting for spinning tackle is ~2.5 lbs. For

baitcasters, #12 Hybrid is 19.5, my drag is set at ~3.0 lbs. I have

only been broken off once in open water. Although that was

heartbreaking, it had nothing to do with my drag setting.

8-)

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With 3-4lbs of drag does your drag engage when you're setting the hook?

No issues.

8-)

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There are only two reels that I care about maximum drag resistance, and they are both for heavy cover/braid applications.  I was able to pump my TDX103HSDL reels to about 24 lbs. of max drag resistance by replacing the stick felt washers with dry Carbontex washers from Smooth drags.  Even in those cases, my drag is set to about 12-14 lbs., to protect the rods (rated to 25 and 30 lb. line).  I am looking to minimize and slippage on the hookset, while protecting the gearing in the reel and the rod itself.

On all my other reels, all I care about is smooth, and progressive slippage at a measured amount.  I'm really anal about this aspect of my fishing.  I like to follow "The One-Third Rule," as I call it.  If I'm fishing with 6 lb. line, I'll set the drag to 2 lbs. of resistance.

Now, its important to note that I factor approximate break strength, not advertised "test strengths."  I also factor in the rod I'm using, and what applications I'm using that rod for.  For instance, I am using 8 lb. P-line CXX on my light cranking stick - an AVC70MM.  I actually only use about 2.75 lbs. of resistance on this rod to protect the trebles on the baits, and reduce tearing, despite this line of holding up to about 12 lbs before distorting, and eventually breaking.

On the flip side of this, my worming and jigging rods (AVC70MHF) are set up with 12 and 15 lb. CXX, and they are both using 5 lbs. of resistance from the drag.

In all cases except my two heavy cover apps, I am using Carbontex replacement washers, with some form of lubrication.  I'm using both Shimano Star Drag Grease, and Cam's Grease, and don't really see any difference.  

Other than the heavy applications detailed above, i don't think you'd ever need more than 5 lbs. of drag.  I do think that operating at the upper reaches of a reel's range inhibits exceptional drag performance.  Carbontex replacement washers go a long way to improving both the maximum resistance, and smooth, consistent performance.

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playing a fish to long builds up to many bad chemicals and increases the chance of death.better to get them in quick and release them.

Perhaps in theory, but in reality I've yet to see or hear about that happening.  Maybe putting a clock on fighting time would work, if the fish is not landed in five minutes, cut the line.  I think many ul and fly fisherman relish catching sizeable fish on light tackle, that's what they are there for. Fish I release just swim away.  I'm sure many here in this forum have battled fish for 30-60 minutes or more, what a rush!

I do advocate reviving them, for the simple reason that in a tired condition they can fall prey to predators, happens with sails and tarpon as shark and cuda inhabit the same waters.  I'm sure pike and muskie would go after a tired bass.

Apologize for going off topic

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With 3-4lbs of drag does your drag engage when you're setting the hook?

No issues.

8-)

I see, so if I had a reel where everytime I were to set the hook, the reel would engage a little even when I locked the drag down, I could safely say there's something wrong with the drag on that reel?

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With 3-4lbs of drag does your drag engage when you're setting the hook?

No issues.

8-)

I see, so if I had a reel where everytime I were to set the hook, the reel would engage a little even when I locked the drag down, I could safely say there's something wrong with the drag on that reel?

You could also be setting the hook too hard.

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With 3-4lbs of drag does your drag engage when you're setting the hook?

Sometimes it does. It has never been a problem. I use light line and sharp hooks. A "geronimo" hookset, with 80 pound braid, a broomstick rod, and a drag set with a pair of pliers is simply NOT necessary. And no fun at all.

I also agree totally with SirSnookalot. I've seen a lot of folks who have no idea how to play a fish.

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I'm using both Shimano Star Drag Grease, and Cam's Grease, and don't really see any difference.

.

I don't see any either

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With 3-4lbs of drag does your drag engage when you're setting the hook?

No issues.

8-)

I see, so if I had a reel where everytime I were to set the hook, the reel would engage a little even when I locked the drag down, I could safely say there's something wrong with the drag on that reel?

You could also be setting the hook too hard.

Yea, that could be it also, I usually fish from a kayak so there's not much room for the "geronimo" hookset, just a quick  sharp hookset done mainly with my arms and little waist, so I didn't think that was the problem.  Maybe I'll try setting it lighter!

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What I have found to work the best, and I learned it from many of the touring pros that it is best to set the drag pretty tight to start in order to get hook penetration and then back the drag off during the fight.  This is the best of both as you get a solid hookset while still utilizing the drag to fight the fish.  With a casting reel I will actually leave it tighted down, and free spool using my thumb to determine the pressure needed.

Steve

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Fun is in the eye of the beholder, and drags for bass fishing are highly over rated, IMHO. Crank it down - use it all: set it and forget it!

-T9

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