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Rod length, impact on casting distance

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How much of an impact does rod length have on casting distance?

A longer bass rod should load more at the beginning of the cast.

If I compare the same rod but in different lengths (6' to 7') will my casting distance increase enough to justify the switch?

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Yes!

8-)

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For the sake of reducing fatigue, I would also say yes.  The luxury the longer rod can afford the angler is to make the same casts but with less effort when there is room for the cast.

The difference, depending on angler skill might be anywhere from 1 - 20' longer casts as a ballpark figure and sometimes that can be enough to make a difference.

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i would say so also.

its been a while since ive used any rod over 6'. i recently got my 6'6" clarus spinning rod and i can cast much further than i could with my 6' BC rig. but the thing is when you have the room. i find myself checking for clearance before i make my casts more often too.

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Conventional wisdom says longer rod = longer casts, all things being equal. All things are rarely equal when fishing, and in my experience, I cast lures the furthest when using my shortest rod. The long cast is the sum of the parts: rod, reel, line, bait, and casting style. A good, two handed, overhead, snap cast on my AVC62MXF, Alphas ITO Ai, 8# CXX, with a Sammy 115 yields a cast that leaves only a half dozen turns of line on the spool.  This is with the spool tension wide open, and the brakes set to 0. By far the longest cast I can make. So long, I sometimes have difficulty getting hooked up. A close second would be a RC 2.5 on my light, 7' cranking rod, or a Spro Frog on my 7' 6" flipping stick.

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Short answer, yes.

Longer rod = longer casts = more water covered

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I have 2 sets of identical rods, except length.

8/17/ m 7'.......8/17 m 7,6, both 15# braid, spinning reels equal

10/20 mh 7'....10/20 mh 7,6 both 20# braid, spinning reels equal

7'6 cast a bit further but not more than about 10 yds, the difference being the shorter rod in each pair is lighter but the longer rods have more backbone and handle same size fish easier.

Depends on where you are fishing whether or not extra distance is needed, with most of my shore fishing the majority of fish are caught within 20 or 30 ' feet of the shore or even closer in (the swash).

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All things equal, the short rod gives the angler greater power and accuracy,

while the long rod offers greater speed and casting distance.

Roger

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Physics are identical comparing  a fishing rod to a golf club.  The longer club creates a wider arc which increases club head speed yielding a further drive with less effort, the head of a golf club "loads" up exactly the way a fishing rod does.

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It makes a BIG difference, but it's not JUST casting difference.

For me, I'm far more accurate with a longer rod, especially pitching and flipping.

Also, you move more line on the hook set, and have more leverage over the fish.

I have 7 rods over 7'6 , and several more 7'3 .

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Also, you move more line on the hook set, and have more leverage over the fish.

Actually, the longer the rod the more leverage you give to the fish.

This is the reason why "stroker rods" used for shark, tuna and billfish normally range between 5 and 6 ft in length.

Rod length can be likened to a transmission, where the short rod represents low gear (more strokes & more power)

while the long rod represents high gear (fewer strokes, less power but more speed).

Roger

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Also, you move more line on the hook set, and have more leverage over the fish.

Actually, the longer the rod the more leverage you give to the fish.

This is the reason why "stroker rods" used for shark, tuna and billfish normally range between 5 and 6 ft in length.

Rod length can be likened to a transmission, where the short rod represents low gear (more strokes & more power)

while the long rod represents high gear (fewer strokes, less power but more speed).

Roger

Yeah, what he (Roger) said.

http://www.bigindianabass.com/big_indiana_bass/long-rods-and-leverage-it-aint-so.html

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I agree with brokeju, longer rods make for better penetration on hooksets. The longer the lever, the quicker your hookset takes up line. I can't stand using rods under 7' for single hook baits unless I'm casting short distances.

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i used to fish 6'6'' and 7' rods but now that ive been using 7'10'' rods all that is gonna change !!! my next rod(s) i am gonna have GBLANKS build me are gonna be a 7'10'' MED. moderate action . and a 7'10'' MED. HEAVY fast action . i just can't see my self using rods under 7'6'' . the way they cast is a dream and hooksets are awesome ..........  :D

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Long rods are advantageous, but apparently not in terms of "mechanical leverage". That's why rods used for the really big game fish are short with powerful winches on 'em.

One possible advantage to the loss of leverage in long rods could be sensitivity and feeling the fight. Any thoughts? Roger??

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How much of an impact does rod length have on casting distance?

A longer bass rod should load more at the beginning of the cast.

If I compare the same rod but in different lengths (6' to 7') will my casting distance increase enough to justify the switch?

The longer the rod then the farther the cast but take one thing into consideration before you just pick up a longer rod.  Make sure that the rod's action, power and lure weight match with the type of lure you're going to use.

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Most of my rods are 7', for most applications this a good length, though I 've been using a 6'6" rod for spinnerbaits as I tend to do a lot of roll cast in shallow water when fishing these baits, also prefer a 6'6" rod for topwater fishing as well. That said I picked up a BPS 7'6" MH Crankin' stick with an extendable handle (makes it easier to store in my rod locker) paired with a Chronarch B with 12 # Floro for deep diving cranks, all I can say is that it's had a tremendous impact on my crankbait fishing this year. This combo absolutely launches these lures which I find critical when fishing this bait style because it allows my baits to get deeper as a result of the longer cast and keeps the lures in the strikezone longer. The deep diving crank has caught me more large fish than my usual gold standard the jig so far this year. The 7'6" rod is probably getting me an extra 10 yards on my cast compared to my old 7' rod. That said I still use a 7' Med combo with 12# Yozuri Hybrid for fishing most of my shallow to medium diving cranks like the Lucky Craft RC series, also use a 6'9" spinning rod for jerkbaits and mini/light cranks like #5 shad raps.

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Also, you move more line on the hook set, and have more leverage over the fish.

As others have said you actually have less leverage over a fish with a longer rod.  As the rod gets longer the distance to the fulcrum point (right in front of your hands) increases which increases the force necessary to control the tip.

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Also, you move more line on the hook set, and have more leverage over the fish.

As others have said you actually have less leverage over a fish with a longer rod. As the rod gets longer the distance to the fulcrum point (right in front of your hands) increases which increases the force necessary to control the tip.

I like a rod with a longer fore grip, when battling a larger fish my hand is always up on that grip giving me a bit more leverage.  I landed a couple of lemons last year in the #150 range on spinning holding my rod that way.

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Also, you move more line on the hook set, and have more leverage over the fish.

As others have said you actually have less leverage over a fish with a longer rod. As the rod gets longer the distance to the fulcrum point (right in front of your hands) increases which increases the force necessary to control the tip.

I like a rod with a longer fore grip, when battling a larger fish my hand is always up on that grip giving me a bit more leverage. I landed a couple of lemons last year in the #150 range on spinning holding my rod that way.

The very reason for the split fighting grip on big game fly rods. Length for casting and hook setting (tip speed), and shorter for lifting power (leverage).

Interesting that a lot of "long rods" for bass fishing also have long handles, meaning you are holding it further up the blank when fishing and fighting, however we are holding the handle down on the grip in casting for distance.

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Long rods are advantageous, but apparently not in terms of "mechanical leverage". That's why rods used for the really big game fish are short with powerful winches on 'em.

One possible advantage to the loss of leverage in long rods could be sensitivity and feeling the fight. Any thoughts? Roger??

I wouldn't expect that question from a purist ;D

Naturally, when we forfeit our power to the fish, the fish's strength will be exaggerated by the long rod.

That's the very reason why it's so much fun to fight bluegill sunfish and brook trout on a 9-foot flyrod.

The next 150 lb bluefin tuna we hookup on a 9-foot rod, I'm going to hand off the rod

to the guy who wants the leverage of a long rod (he'll be drenched in sweat about an hour later) ;D

Roger

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As others have said you actually have less leverage over a fish with a longer rod. As the rod gets longer the distance to the fulcrum point (right in front of your hands) increases which increases the force necessary to control the tip.

I like a rod with a longer fore grip, when battling a larger fish my hand is always up on that grip giving me a bit more leverage. I landed a couple of lemons last year in the #150 range on spinning holding my rod that way.

SirSnook, you need to say 'lemon sharks', because most in here don't live near a coast,

and to them 'lemons' grow on trees ;D

Blank-length aside, I believe that butt-length is grossly understated.

When I'm in the market for a new spinning rod, one of the first things I want to know

is the distance between the butt-cap and reel-stem.

I personally insist on an absolute minimum of 11", but would prefer 14" if it were available.

When standup fishing in saltwater (w/o a fighting chair), we use a gimbal belt and shoulder harness.

These aren't necessary in freshwater, but all I ask is a butt-section where I can rest my forearm.

This comes in handy when pulling the boat over to a snagged lure, when fighting one of those all too infrequent toads

or just to use as an armrest.

Roger

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I guess when I said the word "Leverage" I meant it in a different way. Not to mention, we're talking bass hear, not 150lb salt water fish. Although what you said may hold true about power, it's on a much smaller scale when it comes to bass. I was implying more the fact that I can steer a fish away from structure that I do not want it near. I do a lot of short casting in close areas, longer rods help me lead the fish much easier.

There's a reason why almost every company is now offering a ton of over 7ft rods.

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