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kyron4

Line capacity on spinning reels ?

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How important is line capacity when chooseing a spinning reel ? How much line is really needed ? I ask because I like the feel and balance of the smaller spinning reels like the Shimano 750 and 1000 sereis, but like to use #8 mono when these are made more for #4 mono. I can get about 80-85 yds. of Trilene XL on the spool and it cast well enough with 1/8 to 1/4 oz. lures. I can't see getting "spooled" even from the odd catfish or snaged carp. So is there any real reason to go with a bigger reel than just line cap. ? Is 80yds. of line more than enough ? Any thoughts on the subject ?

-Thanks

P.S. I know I can get more braid on the spool than mono, but I'd like to stick with mono for my own reseaons ?  ::)

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bigger spool diameter promotes less line twist and coiling issues.bigger reel is stronger in every way.if you want light buy a pflueger supreme or a supreme xt with a magnesium frame.

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80 yards is plenty of line.

8-)

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I tried to use a 1000 Shimano like you are thinking. I could cast off all most all of the line and that made me nervous. So now I don't go bigger than 6# on them.

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Bigger reel equals bigger spool, and all else being equal, you'll get longer casts with a bigger spool. That may or may not be a factor for where and how you fish. I only use reels that size for Crappie fishing or small creek bass, but that's just my preference. If it works for you, don't worry about it.

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If you really like the smaller spool and casting distance isn't a big concern, you could spool up with braid to counter the coiling. 80+ yard of line should be OK.

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Bigger reel equals bigger spool, and all else being equal, you'll get longer casts with a bigger spool. That may or may not be a factor for where and how you fish. I only use reels that size for Crappie fishing or small creek bass, but that's just my preference. If it works for you, don't worry about it.

I use this set up mainly for white bass during the spring run and smallmouth and walleye wading the rivers. Around here a 4 lbs. Smallie is a "big one" most run 12-16 inches.

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I'm with Dodgeguy. Samller spool equals more line twist and tighter memory coils. I just don't like anything smaller than a 2000 series.

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I use a Daiwa 1500 series reel on my Kistler Drop Shot rod for this very reason.  I generally run 15# braid, but have a backup spool with 4# Silverthread AN40.

The real risk is in the drag system.  Most reels below that 2500 size have a single metal and felt or fiber washer drag system.  The bigger spools can accommodate a seven washer or more stack.  Ironic?

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80 yards is plenty of line.

8-)

Ditto -for bass. If there is a chance of you hooking stripers, or salmon, capacity, (not just line strength) enters the picture. Could spin you some yarns on this, but I'll spare your eyes and my fingers.

For bass reels , I use kite string for backing and put on about 120 yards. After this I replace the top 80 or so when needed. This also saves bucks, esp with FC.

So, capacity doesn't matter so much for bass reels. But spool diameter does IMO. Avoid small spools; go for a larger spool which will handle a wider range of line diameters, and formulas. Lines with some memory are much less a problem on wider spools, and stiffer lines like FCs handle better on wider spools. Wider spools offer more speed and require less gear ratio to realize ipt (inches per turn).

Wider spools, as J mentions, provide smoother drags, esp at start-up. But, this is unimportant to me bc I have never used drag on a spinning reel. I back-reel, which has so many advantages. I'm still waiting on the ultimate spinning reel: wide spool, small gear package, no drag, clip-on/off spools. 8-)

On casting gear I've come to avoid V-spools bc of possible capacity issues they can present. My first casting reel was a Shimano Bantam that came with a cool snap-in/snap-out V-spool. It was fine for learning, but soon enough it simply shortened my casting distance. And if I lost line during a day's fishing, my casting was greatly compromised. I took the V-spool out 25years ago and never put it back in.

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I think 50-60 yards is more than enough for bass fishing. I wouldn't use heavier equipment than I wanted to for bass just because of the small possibility of getting spooled by a carp.

As many have mentioned, all other things being equal, a given line size performs better on a larger spool. I would not use 8# on a 750-1000 size reel.

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