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BadBass94

Split Grip Casting rod

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I am looking to buy a new casting rod and am just wondering what the real purpose of the split grip handles are for. Are they for looks, weight reduction, comfortablity, thanks in advance..

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They are a tad lighter and marginally more sensitive (some argue that the change in sensitivity is not enough to notice)

I prefer the way they look and feel.

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Most people like them because they look cool.  I personally like them more than regular grips because of the ergonomics.  Big on top and skinny on bottom is what feels good in my hand but YMMV.

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I have heard various explanations for why split grips are good.  I like the comfort of the grips and I really like the no foregrip feature which enables constant contact with the blank.  A rod builder recently told me he prefers using split grips because he likes to cut away any excess stuff on the blank.  He thinks more grip material causes a dampening effect on the blank, and essentially limits the blank's ability to transmit vibration to your hand.  Whether this is true or not I have no clue, but sounds good to me  ;)

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I am looking to buy a new casting rod and am just wondering what the real purpose of the split grip handles are for. Are they for looks, weight reduction, comfortablity, thanks in advance..

It's a gimmick that's caught on. The SG rods allow for fancy bling to be painted onto the rod both on the handle area and where the foregrip would go.  As for weight reduction?  How much does cork weigh?  If that little weight is an issue I'd suggest some time in the gym.  Sensitivity?  First, I don't have my hands up on the foregrip area to begin with though the foregrip area missing is not that big a deal.  What little dampening happens with the cork missing isn't worth not having the cork there.  It's a personal choice matter really. ;)

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  I've built rods using both methods, and I consistently find the split grip rods to be overall lighter, more sensitive, and just plain cool looking.

In my experience, sensitivity rating seems to be wildly subjective from angler to angler.  I myself think that by removing anything above the reel seat, I can improve the overall sensitivity of a rod.  The difference isn't huge, nor is it substantial enough to have a noticeably negative impact on the rod should you choose to properly use a fore grip.

  During my builds for anglers that really pay attention to detail; lure contact, bottom makeup, etc.. I have yet to have a user tell me that using a split grip/no foregrip setup didn't improve overall sensitivity.

On the flip side, I've had guys that simply run and gun all day tell me they didn't see the benefit and needed a full grip for the added casting comfort.  Either way, the rod needs accommodate your fishing habits, you shouldn't be forced to accommodate a rod that doesn't suit you.

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The grip is the LAST thing I care about when buying a rod. The claims of extra sensitivty are nonsense, yes there is a reduction in weight, but if any thing, the reduction in weight has negative effects on balance, at least in the factory split grips I have seen.

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I am looking to buy a new casting rod and am just wondering what the real purpose of the split grip handles are for. Are they for looks, weight reduction, comfortablity, thanks in advance..

It's a gimmick that's caught on. The SG rods allow for fancy bling to be painted onto the rod both on the handle area and where the foregrip would go. As for weight reduction? How much does cork weigh? If that little weight is an issue I'd suggest some time in the gym. Sensitivity? First, I don't have my hands up on the foregrip area to begin with though the foregrip area missing is not that big a deal. What little dampening happens with the cork missing isn't worth not having the cork there. It's a personal choice matter really. :o

X2 - no question....a marketing gimmick, pure & simple. Something to raise the cost and pull more green from your pocket! (Isn't America great!)

They do look cool however, I'll give ya that - but only that. If you think they are more sensitive....then I have a heck of a bridge for sale in N.J. that you are just going to love! ;)

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"Balance" is also a little subjective. Balance point to some may mean the rod will see-saw on a finger under the reel or in front of the reel seat. I view balance more as being just the right mix of blank, guides, grip etc. to provide a rod that  casts well & presents baits as intended while feeling light and comfortable in the hands. A split grip may be part of that, but doesn't have to be.  ;)

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The grip is the LAST thing I care about when buying a rod. The claims of extra sensitivty are nonsense, yes there is a reduction in weight, but if any thing, the reduction in weight has negative effects on balance, at least in the factory split grips I have seen.

i agree %100!!!

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  That's a pretty good summary of balance, and it sounds like I pretty much agree.

One thing about balance that has always puzzled me.  People tend to bicker about how a rod will balance, even to the point where they place massive counter weights at the end of the rod handle.

When you have 30 feet of line out, with a 1/2oz lure attached (example).  There isn't much of anything you can do as a builder to overcome that load, in relation to "balancing" a rod.  So I think you've nailed when you say the objective, is to build a rod that feels comfortable in the hands.

;)

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When the rod weighs 5oz or less, a "little" cork is going to make a noticeable difference in overall weight.

I think increased sensitivity makes perfect sense. A blank is a tube right? It sends vibrations up and down it's length. The less material you have touching the blank, the less material there is to absorb and/or disperse vibration. Sort of like putting your hand on a rattling snare drum.

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First of all I'd say it depends on the rod series.  Many of them have split grips for weight reduction.  I'd say that's the primary reason.  Of course that also presents possible ballance issues.

Some of the low end split grip rods are done completely for cosmetics.  I've seen some with metal trim that made them heavier than if they were solid grips.

As far as sensitivity...  If you're touching that exposed part of the handle you WILL feel more vibration transmitted than if that section were covered with handle material.  But who is touching that part?

Most of my rods are traditional, but I've added a couple of split grips & really like them as well.  The blank is way more important than than the handle to me (assuming the handle is comfortable).

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To me it is all about confidence and I am more confident using split grip rods.  I like the way they feel in my hand and I like having more fingers on the blank.  Whether this is all psychological or whatever I don't care.  Bottom line, if I am more confident in any lure, line, rod, or reel I tend to catch more fish.  I make committed casts where I pay attention to everything rather then just pitching out there and halfheartedly reeling back in.  Just my .02

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I am looking to buy a new casting rod and am just wondering what the real purpose of the split grip handles are for. Are they for looks, weight reduction, comfortablity, thanks in advance..

It's a gimmick that's caught on. The SG rods allow for fancy bling to be painted onto the rod both on the handle area and where the foregrip would go. As for weight reduction? How much does cork weigh? If that little weight is an issue I'd suggest some time in the gym. Sensitivity? First, I don't have my hands up on the foregrip area to begin with though the foregrip area missing is not that big a deal. What little dampening happens with the cork missing isn't worth not having the cork there. It's a personal choice matter really. :o

X2 - no question....a marketing gimmick, pure & simple. Something to raise the cost and pull more green from your pocket! (Isn't America great!)

They do look cool however, I'll give ya that - but only that. If you think they are more sensitive....then I have a heck of a bridge for sale in N.J. that you are just going to love! ;)

While it may be a gimmick in the commercial setting, certain corks weigh enough that a split grip will allow a rod to balance. If you full gripped a rod with exotic burl, for example, it would be uncomfortably heavy and out of balance. Sure you can decorate the split but that's a by-product, not the genesis. I realize your comment was probably directed at the commercial side of things but let's keep the facts in order to avoid further confusion.

As for the balance comments in a true sense it's easy to measure with a fulcrum. Whether you hold with 1,2 or 3 fingers ahead of the trigger doesn't change a rod's balance or lack there of. Your grip only changes what you feel- which is about the most subjective thing in all of fishing. In moving baits, there is no need or cure for balance. But on a worm or jig rod where you are constantly without tension, it can make a tremendous difference. I have yet to meet someone that preferred a rod with extra tip weight.

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The grip is the LAST thing I care about when buying a rod. The claims of extra sensitivty are nonsense, yes there is a reduction in weight, but if any thing, the reduction in weight has negative effects on balance, at least in the factory split grips I have seen.

i agree %100!!!

Totaly agree. I'd rather fish with a neutraly balanced rod than a "tip heavy" rod.

About sensitivity, IMHO it's more effective to keep your eyes and a finger on the line (or a finger on the spool) than shaving of the cork on the handle. I cast with 2 hands most of the time and just hate the feel of split grips...

But hey, the companies are making good money with this gimmik (sp) ;)

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I'm not really following where you guys think companies are making more money? Do you mean by saving component costs? Do you mean that by using split grips, the rod is more attractive, thus they move more product?

I would think the consumer is going to buy a rod regardless of the evolution of how rod's are being built.  With the current state of the mass produced rod lines, I'm seeing prices decreasing across the board.  You can look at virtually any company and most now offer a quality product line for under $100 bucks, yes most all utilize split grips.

I can't add anything else to this thread other than what I've stated. Flechero has much more experience than I, and he pretty much nailed it.  I do think removing weight from a rod blank, helps with the overall sensitivity of the stick.  I think its pretty commonly accepted that the most noticeable gains are when we can remove weight from the reel seat forward.  In saying that, use whatever floats your boat, if it works for you, it will likely work for the fish.

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The way i grip my rods,split grips just feel much,much more comfortable.Gimmick or not,there are people out there that really prefer the split grips over the full covered grip rods for this reason.

I don't know where the tip heavy is coming from...none of mine seem tip heavy at all. :-?

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I think in terms of rods less is definately better.  I remember the first rods I had they had about four inches of fore grip. You couldn't even touch the blank by the reel seat. I think by reducing materials on the blank definately adds to sensativity and weight reduction. If it was a gimmick it would never have become standards throughout most rod companies. I think the people that say it has no affect from rods with full grips probably haven't spent the time with a top of the line split grip rods and are just reluctant to change. Personally I wasn't a fan at first either buy after using them for a season now 10-14 rods I own are split grip. The only reason I have full grip rods are swimbait rods that have ling handles that I stick under my arm as I retrieve. 

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It's a gimmick that's caught on.

That is BS ....

It isn't a gimmick, been building on splits for a decade now. It never was a custom rod sales gimmick it was used to reduce the overall weight of the finished product.

The manufacturers that have finally jumped on board are using it as such.

Whether we (custom builders) could use the extra area for bling or not just evolved. But the real reason it came about was for weight reduction, and the sensitivity issue came with it.

Tight Lines All!!!

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I think they're pretty cool looking, and that's probably about it. I'm looking to get a Daiwa split grip as my next purchase. ;)

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